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Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), Through the Looking Glass: A Radical Guide to Stanford

The University Archives is pleased to annouce the availability of three new online exhibits: Board of Trustees Records, Faculty Senate Records, and Stanford Publications.

The Board of Trustees exhibit includes agendas, minutes, photographs, and directories documenting the administrative history of the Board of Trustees. The site features scanned and born-digital records held by the University Archives. Since this is an ongoing digitization project, not all materials are available online. What is available are minutes (1936-2016) and agendas (1906-1908, 1955-1985, 2005-2016). For a full listing of materials held by the Archives please visit: http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/c8dn43h8. Note: Board of Trustees records are restricted 20 years from date of creation.

The Faculty Senate exhibit is the culmination of a collaborative project with the Academic Secretary's office to digitize and make available administrative records of the Faculty Senate. The site includes minutes, agendas, supporting materials, and photographs documeting the founding and history of the Faculty Senate. Note: agendas and minutes are restricted to the Stanford community; supporting materials (except for memorial resolutions) are restricted 20 years from date of creation. Look for a physical exhibit in 2018 to honor the 50th anniversary of the Faculty Senate.

The Stanford publications exhibit brings together a variety publications documenting Stanford University. Included are course catalogs, directories, newspapers, newsletters, magazines, journals, and more. Especially noteworthy are student publications. This, too, is an ongoing digitization project and materials will be added here as they become available. Look for additional publications from women's organizations, the LGBT community, and communities of color.

Lockss logo

You may already know the story of LOCKSS’ beginnings (PDF).

On a fall day in 1999, a hike in the woods became the backdrop for a spontaneous problem-solving session on the preservation gap affecting online journals. The hikers, an electronic serials librarian (Vicky Reich) and a computer scientist (David Rosenthal), sketched out a plan to replicate the incidentally distributed, redundant architecture by which print journals had been preserved, in a digital system. They brought the proposal to the Stanford University Librarian, Michael Keller, who famously blessed the project with the admonition, “don’t cost me any money; don’t get me into trouble; do what you want.”

UN Water 2017 World Water Day Theme: Wastewater

March 22 is World Water Day!  This year's theme, Wastewater, discusses ways to reduce and reuse wastewater.

Erasmus Adagia front cover

A recently cataloged item in our Rare Books Collection, a gift from Friend of the Library Frank J. Novak III, has an interesting provenance. The book in question is a 1533 Basel edition of humanist scholar Erasmus’s Adagia, an enormous collection of proverbs in Latin and Greek. It was issued in multiple editions from 1500-1536, each edition larger than the last as Erasmus found more entries culled from his reading of ancient literature. The Adagia is the source of many commonplace sayings in Western European languages, such as “the grass is greener over the fence,” “many hands make light work,” etc.

Recently, I worked with Cécile Alduy, Professor of French, and SUL's Nicholas Taylor and Sarah Sussman to use SUL's Web Archiving Service to generate a corpus of French political websites that we text-mine. The results informed Alduy's latest book, Ce qu'ils disent vraiment: Les politiques pris aux mots. Now, I've written up the details of this process, which you can read on my website.

Cover image of Echo echo : reverso poems about Greek myths

Join UNESCO in celebrating World Poetry Day today March 21. Begun in 1999 World Poetry Day supports "linguistic diversity" worldwide.  "Poetry reaffirms our common humanity by revealing to us that individuals, everywhere in the world, share the same questions and feelings."  Check out the guide to Poetry for children and young adults in Cubberley Library's Curriculum Collection.

Cover image of Somos como las nubes

Cubberley Education Library has a new guide on Immigrants and refugees in books for children and young adults.  These books which are part of our Curriculum Collection are available to be checked out by members of the Stanford community.

Mount Broderick and Nevada Fall, Yosemite

Carleton Watkins (1829-1916) photographed some amazing landscapes throughout California and the broader West Coast, especially in Yosemite. Originally from New York, the gold rush drew Watkins to California in 1851. While he failed to strike it rich in gold, Watkins became involed in photography and became a well known landscape photographer. Stanford has newly released some of these digitized landscapes from three works by Watkins: Photographs of the Pacific coastPhotographs of the Columbia river and Oregon, and Photographs of the Yosemite Valley. Find a sampling below and we hope you'll browse through the full works as well!

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