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The Digital Production Group’s Map Scanning Lab has successfully completed the digitization of 500 antiquarian sheet maps depicting California as an island. 

http://purl.stanford.edu/sp153gq7179

Forensic imaging station used in Forensic/Born Digital Lab

Glynn Edwards, Peter Chan and Michael Olson from Special Collections and Digital Library Systems and Services will be hosting colleagues from the Bodleian Library, Oxford this August.  Our colleagues from the Bodleian will be spending a day and half at Stanford to learn more about how we are describing born digital archival materials.

In an important collaboration this month, Stanford Media Preservation Lab and the Department of Special Collections & University Archives are participating in the California Audiovisual Preservation Project, a pioneering statewide initiative, for a third round in a row. The CAVPP is providing funds to reformat film and video selections from SULAIR’s collections, including newly resurrected video from the Stanford Prison Experiment and the Stanford University Film Collection. These items will be sent to an outside vendor with the equipment necessary to capture preservation-quality digital files from these unique materials in obsolete formats. The digitized content will be preserved in the Stanford Digital Repository and made broadly available to the public through the California Light and Sound collection at the Internet Archive.

In June, approximately 68,000 images representing nearly 300 items across several collections were accessioned to the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR). The items include:

  • Archives Parlementaires (81 books, 64,800 pages)
  • Classic Papyrii (44 fragments, 88 images)
  • Stanford Oral History Project (140 interviews, 2110 files)
  • Special Collections Materials (18 photo collections, 900 images)

While many of these objects are already discoverable via SearchWorks others will get SearchWorks records in the coming months. However, all materials are currently available via the item’s PURL (a persistent URL which ensure that these materials are available from a single URL over the long-term, regardless of changes in file location or application technology).

DLSS has released the source code for two of its library infrastructure projects:

Argo, Stanford's administrative "hydra head" for Fedora, provides a viewing, reporting and administrative interface for objects in a Fedora repository. It is also coupled with Stanford's lightweight and engine-free workflow system ("WorkDo") to provide a workflow visualization and control mechanism. WorkDo is a Hydra- and Fedora-compatible system that chains small scripts "robots" and microservices into complex processes to complete both human- and machine-based task flows.

dor-services is a Ruby gem that exposes Stanford’s Fedora-based Digital Object Registry (DOR) services and content models to both Hydra and non-Hydra processes. In addition to functional access to DOR’s Registration, Workflow, Identifier, Search, Metadata, Digital Stacks, and Preservation Ingest services, the dor-services library also defines a number of discrete modules that can be mixed into Hydra object models to extend their functionality. Each module is named according to a salient characteristic that it imparts to a digital object, and defines both object methods (what the object can do) as well as expectations (what metadata the object needs to provide) in order to properly represent that characteristic.

In May, approximately 1,400 images representing eighteen mostly 15th and 16h century books were accessioned to the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR). These items are part of Special Collections' goal to digitize and make more accessible materials considered "Beautiful Books". John Mustain is the collection contact for the materials listed below.

All of these books were previously discoverable via SearchWorks but required a visit to Special Collections to view these non-circulating materials. Access to digitized images of these books is now available via the item’s PURL (a persistent URL which ensure that these materials are available from a single URL over the long-term, regardless of changes in file location or application technology).

The latest version of the Stanford University Libraries and Academic Information Resources Quality Assurance Image Defects page is now “live” and made freely available to the cultural heritage and library communities.

This is a long-awaited tool that serves a range of production, development, and training needs. It includes sample images of common (and uncommon) defects, causes/sources, and potential remedies.

https://lib.stanford.edu/digital-production-services/quality-assurance-image-defects

This page compliments the outstanding and hugely popular AV Artifact site that was produced by our own Stanford Media Preservation Lab team.

http://preservation.bavc.org/artifactatlas/index.php/Table_of_Contents

Future work on the Image Defects page will include contributions from Imaging Scientist Don Williams, and content from the Library of Congress and Federal Agencies Digitization Guidelines Initiative.

In April, approximately 41,000 images representing just over 1,300 items across several collections were accessioned to the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR).

  • R. Stuart Hummel collection: ~1,000 items (~ 35,000 images)
  • Stanford Medieval Manuscripts: 280 manuscripts (560 images)
  • Bibliothèque nationale du France: 3 manuscripts ( ~ 1,300 images)
  • Reid Dennis California Lithographs: 47 lithographs (47 images)
  • Archives Parlementaires: 2 books (1,600 images)
  • Special Collections Requests: 19 items (~2,800 images)

While many of these objects are already discoverable via SearchWorks others will get SearchWorks records in the coming months. However, all materials are currently available via the item’s PURL (a persistent URL which ensure that these materials are available from a single URL over the long-term, regardless of changes in file location or application technology).

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