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Fan Image

By Astrid J. Smith and Wayne Vanderkuil.
An object associated with demure and lady-like behavior, the captions underneath each detailed etched vignette on this 1797 fan are surprisingly wry, witty, and thought provoking. Once commonplace, no self-respecting Georgian era lady would be without such an object. As Leah Marie Brown states, “Fans were must-have accoutrements for ladies of 18th century. They were used to perform multiple functions: They could offer a gentle breeze in an overheated room, allow the user to spy on people behind her (some fans had small mirrors on their sticks), conceal gossiping lips, and convey a secret (or not so secret) message.”
See how Digital Production Group went about imaging this unique ladies' fan.

Kwangtung Province

In January, approximately 137,000 new files representing over 35,500 items were accessioned into the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR). These materials include -- but are not limited to -- items from the Jarnydce Collection, TRAIL Maps Project, and the Revs Digital Library.

Spotlights in the Centre Ceramique, Maastricht

by Stu Snydman & Gary Geisler

The Stanford University Libraries (SUL) have a rich and diverse collection of digital content. Users can discover collections and content from the Stanford Digital Repository through the library website, library catalog (SearchWorks), and persistent citation (PURL) pages. SUL also develops robust, custom-built websites for selected  collections (see Parker on the Web and the French Revolution Digital Archive) that provide a rich discovery environment and a range of features that enable users to more effectively work with the collection items. But these sites require significant investment in time and development resources to produce and maintain, limiting the number and variety SUL can support.

Satirical print of French aristocrats

We're excited to announce Stanford University Libraries' release of the French Revolution Digital Archive web site (FRDA): frda.stanford.edu

FRDA is the result of a multi-year collaboration of the Stanford University Libraries and the Bibliothèque nationale de France (BnF) to produce a digital version of the key research sources of the French Revolution and make them available to the international scholarly community. 

Sea otter, image by Mike Baird

If you've ever been there, you know that Hopkins Marine Station (HMS) is a special place. But it's not just a special place for those of us who love the gorgeous views; it's a special place for scientists as well. Which is why it's such a treat that researchers at Hopkins Marine Station continue to make more of their historical research data available to others through the Stanford Digital Repository.

A compact cassette from the Clayman institute on Gender Studies SC0705

The recent digitization of cassettes from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research was a reminder of the wide range of collection sizes preserved by SMPL. This entry will give a brief description of why this collection is interesting and how it relates to the multiple workflows of the Stanford Media Preservation Lab. 

Wiki home page

Over on the Library of Congress Digitial Preservation blog, the Artifact Atlas, our crowdsourced effort to document audio-video related artifacts experienced during digitization, was given a flattering profile. In this interview with Hannah Frost, Digital Library Services Manager here at Stanford, and Jenny Brice, Preservation Coordinator at the Bay Area Video Coalition, we learn about the origin of the resource, its governance, its role in the Quality Control Tools for Video Preservation project, and new developments. Check it out! 

4chan forum logo

The free-for-all, anything-goes nature of anonymous posting to discussions boards is a defining feature of Internet subculture, and arguably nowhere has this practice been more vigorous or virulent than on 4ChanNow those notorious anonymous posts are available from the SDR

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