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Satirical print of French aristocrats

We're excited to announce Stanford University Libraries' release of the French Revolution Digital Archive web site (FRDA): frda.stanford.edu

FRDA is the result of a multi-year collaboration of the Stanford University Libraries and the Bibliothèque nationale de France (BnF) to produce a digital version of the key research sources of the French Revolution and make them available to the international scholarly community. 

Sea otter, image by Mike Baird

If you've ever been there, you know that Hopkins Marine Station (HMS) is a special place. But it's not just a special place for those of us who love the gorgeous views; it's a special place for scientists as well. Which is why it's such a treat that researchers at Hopkins Marine Station continue to make more of their historical research data available to others through the Stanford Digital Repository.

A compact cassette from the Clayman institute on Gender Studies SC0705

The recent digitization of cassettes from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research was a reminder of the wide range of collection sizes preserved by SMPL. This entry will give a brief description of why this collection is interesting and how it relates to the multiple workflows of the Stanford Media Preservation Lab. 

Wiki home page

Over on the Library of Congress Digitial Preservation blog, the Artifact Atlas, our crowdsourced effort to document audio-video related artifacts experienced during digitization, was given a flattering profile. In this interview with Hannah Frost, Digital Library Services Manager here at Stanford, and Jenny Brice, Preservation Coordinator at the Bay Area Video Coalition, we learn about the origin of the resource, its governance, its role in the Quality Control Tools for Video Preservation project, and new developments. Check it out! 

4chan forum logo

The free-for-all, anything-goes nature of anonymous posting to discussions boards is a defining feature of Internet subculture, and arguably nowhere has this practice been more vigorous or virulent than on 4ChanNow those notorious anonymous posts are available from the SDR

Sound recording of Peter the dolphin after having LSD administered

Recently a film director from the BBC visited the Stanford Libraries while seeking content for a documentary related to the noted cetacean researcher and activist John C. Lilly (1915-2001).

Stanford University Library's (SUL) collaboration with the California Audiovisual Preservation Project (CAVPP) has yielded two more preserved objects on the Internet Archive: 

The Dragmaticon is Williams' revision, made ca. 1144-50, of his most important work, De Philosophia Mundi. Written in dramatic dialogue form, the Dragmaticon touches on all aspects of "The science of the world," i.e. astronomy, geography, meteorology and medicine. Further, it attempts to reconcile discrepancies between church doctrine and scientific observation.

In December, approximately 366,000, files representing over 43,000 items were accessioned into the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR). These materials include -- but are not limited to -- items from the Jarnydce Collection, TRAIL Maps Project, and the Revs Digital Library.

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