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Yung-Yidish no. 1, cover.
I'm pleased to announce that the Stanford University Libraries have digitized a complete set of the rare (and fragile) avant-garde Yiddish literary and artistic journal Yung-Idish.  All three issues were published in Lodz, 1919, and the digitized versions are found at the following URLs:
 
 
For background on the Yung-Idish (or: Yung-yidish) group, see the entry in the YIVO Encyclopediahttp://www.yivoencyclopedia.org/article.aspx/Yung-yidish.
"The founding of Yung-yidish, the first Yiddish artistic avant-garde group in Poland, grew out of a meeting in 1918 between poet Moyshe Broderzon and a group of visual artists centered around Yitskhok Broyner, Yankl Adler, and Marek Szwarc. Eventually, the group included some 20-odd members including Yitsḥak Katzenelson, Yekhezkl-Moyshe Nayman, and Hershele, as well as younger people discovered by the group, such as the artist Henekh Bartshinski and the writers Elimelekh Shmulevitsh, Khayim Leyb Fuks, and Yisroel Shtern."
 
Yung-Idish was also the subject of a scholarly monograph by the Polish art historian Jerzy Malinowski: Grupa "Jung Idysz" i żydowskie środowisko "Nowej Sztuki" w Polsce, 1918-1923. Warszawa: Polska Akademia Nauk, Instytut Sztuki, 1987.
 
In addition, I see that there is a Facebook page devoted to the group:
 

Stanford's set of Yung-Idish is part of the Ezra Lahad Collection, which was acquired by Roger Kohn for Stanford in 1998.  The issues, on crumbling thin cardboard stock, were painstakingly conserved by the Stanford Libraries' professional conservators in 2012, prior to their digitization.

1951 Louis Armstrong Record Label, photo by Klaus Hiltscher

Back in the 1980s, five libraries -- including Stanford's -- undertook an effort to provide better user access to their sound recording collections. The result of this effort was a union catalog of pre-LP disc holdings that made it possible for users to find out what each of the five institutions actually owned.

High-volume book scanning lab

In June and July, approximately 30,000, images representing nearly 14,000 items were accessioned into the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR). These materials include about 12,000 images from the Revs collection, 128 additional books from the Stephen J Gould collection, 43 Inspector General semiannual reports to congress, and a particularly prized volume of the Talmud.

Word of Mouth

This is a story about the power of word of mouth.

5.25 inch. floppy disk

Professor Donald Emmerson from the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies found seven 5.25 floppy disks containing files created using WordPerfect 5.1 under MS DOS 3.3 in 1992 and 1993. Dave Sare at the Institute posted " Professor needs to convert old files SOLUTION" in the expert partners mailing list and thereafter we are connected.

An image of a problematic cassette in original housing.

Compact cassettes, despite their simplicity, often present problems during digitization. This entry will highlight an approach to digitizing compact cassettes that exhibit squealing and speed instability after being rehoused using new hubs, slip sheets and associated components.  Since I have started here the only cassettes, to present this problem are labeled “Stanford Bookstore”, so the actual manufacturer of the cassettes is unknown. Currently there are two common treatments for addressing squealing cassettes: playback in a cold environment or lubrication of the tape during playback. This entry describes tape lubrication and is informed by the work of Richard Hess and Marie O’Connell. I will first introduce the collection currently being digitized then briefly highlight an approach to applying D5 (Decamethylcyclopentasiloxane) lubricant to rehoused cassettes. For more information on D5 and soft binder syndrome, visit Richard Hess’s webpage here: http://bit.ly/11SBTVP.

 

Undergraduates are a hard-working group, and nowhere is this truer than here at Stanford. Our undergraduates make frequent contributions to scientific research all over campus, and important contributions are important to preserve. Which is why today's Deposit of the Week comes to us from student Tessaly Jen.

The Forensics / Born-Digital lab recently received a request from the Earth Sciences Library to recover the data off of a Zip disk.  The Zip disk format was created by Iomega corporation in 1994 and was a large floppy disk like format with a capacity of 100 MB.  The drives are no longer commercially available but the Forensics / Born-Digital lab has a Zip disk drive to recover data from this format.

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