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Looking ahead from the 2015 IIPC General Assembly

May 18, 2015
by Nicholas Taylor

A couple of weeks have passed since the successful conclusion of the annual IIPC General Assembly, hosted this year by Stanford University Libraries and Internet Archive. The meeting has been well summarized already in posts by Sawood Alam, Jefferson Bailey, Emmanuelle Bermes, Tom Cramer, Carlos Eduardo Entini, and Ian Milligan. Rather than contributing another retrospective, I'd like to instead look ahead to 2016 and consider what the web archiving community might accomplish together in the coming year, highlighting some of the opportunities discussed and presented two weeks ago.

Web Archiving in 2015 -- a Quick Redux of IIPC's General Assembly at Stanford

May 2, 2015
by Tom Cramer

This past week saw the 2015 General Assembly of the IIPC, International Internet Preservation Coalition--probably the biggest week and biggest event of the year in the web archiving world. The IIPC has 50 members from 30 countries, and comprises the leading web archiving institutions in the world, including tons of national libraries, the Internet Archive, and a growing number of research institutions.

Salmon data in EarthWorks

Introducing EarthWorks, Stanford's new GIS data discovery application

Stanford University Libraries is happy to introduce EarthWorks, our new geospatial data discovery application. EarthWorks is a discovery tool for geospatial (a.k.a. GIS) data. It allows users to search and browse the GIS collections owned by Stanford University Libraries, as well as data collections from many other institutions. Data can be searched spatially, by manipulating a map; by keyword search; by selecting search limiting facets (e.g., limit to a given format type); or by combining these options.

SDR Deposit of the Week: Better processes for better chips

It only makes sense that if you were making solar cells or computer chips that you would choose the best materials for those tasks. It's a no-brainer, right? The problem is that the best materials might be very expensive to use. 

Such has been the case with gallium arsenide, but this may be changing.

Bruce Clemens and Garrett Hayes have developed a new way of making chips from gallium arsenide that brings down the cost considerably. They created a video that describes a new manufacturing process, and they have preserved that video in the Stanford Digital Repository for you to download and watch!

SDR Deposit of the Week: Ferguson Grand Jury, 100 years of INS annual reports, and the historic Moynihan Report

March 1, 2015
by Mr. James R. (Librarian) Jacobs

Hands Up Don't Shoot Ferguson protestsStanford bibliographers have long needed a tool to collect, preserve and give access to born-digital documents and publications that fall within scope of their collecting areas. For the last several years, we have been using a tool to collect Everyday Electronic Materials (EEMS). However, the EEMs system has some technical and workflow constraints that do not meet our growing needs.

Offshore platform

SDR Deposit of the Week: Reliability of Marine Structures

February 3, 2015
by Amy E. Hodge

Construction of marine facilities is an expensive endeavor, with platforms built in deep waters costing in the billions of dollars. That makes it important to do it right the first time. Research at the John A. Blume Center for Earthquake Engineering has helped to advance the offshore industry's knowledge of how to build these structures more reliably.

Student theses and research reports from visiting scholars in the Reliability of Marine Structures (RMS) Program are now preserved and available through the Stanford Digital Repository.

Fragment of Text of Canon Law dealing with statues in church

Eight new digital collections now available in SearchWorks

Eight new digital collections are now available in SearchWorks. These collections take advantage of SearchWorks' ability to provide users with rich discovery and access capabilities for finding and working with digital collection content.

Medieval fragments study collection, 11th-16th cent

Abstract: Primarily fragments, these specimens were acquired to demonstrate the development of writing in the western world. A variety of scripts are represented, from Carolingian minuscule to the humanistic hands and the "cancelleresca."

Collection contact: Benjamin Albritton

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