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Stanford University Libraries has provided digital access to large portions of the Musical Acoustics Research Library (MARL) making available important research papers from some of the most eminent acousticians of the 20th century. The MARL collection consisting of nearly 60 linear feet of materials is dedicated to the study of all aspects of musical acoustics.

The Digital Production Group recently finished digitization of the Musical Acoustics Research Library collection and the content is now online.  This collection consists of independent archives or libraries assembled by distinguished groups or individuals in the field of musical acoustics research.  MARL is comprised of the Catgut Acoustical Society Library, the Arthur H. Benade Archive, the John Backus Archive, and the John W. Coltman Archive.

Some of the acoustical knowledge in this research archive has been used by leading players and manufacturers to modify the production of instruments, and the design of concert halls and recording studios.  The research covers not only wind instruments, but also room acoustics, and the interplay between acoustical physicas and the mechanisms of auditory processing . The collection consists of papers, photograhs, medua, digital materials, wood samples, clarinet mouth pieces, and lab equipment.

Above photo taken from the Catgut Acoustical Society Library, Series1, Box18, Folder8 - Condax, Louis M. - Photos: Curtis, and Condax in Studio (http://purl.stanford.edu/qq458wj3438#flipbook)

Check out the collection online: http://www.oac.cdlib.org/view?docId=kt6h4nf6qc;developer=local;style=oac4;doc.view=items

We're pleased to announce the release of Version 1.6 of Parker on the Web, the sixth incremental site release since the launch of Version 1.0 in Fall 2009.

Version 1.6 constitutes a major improvement in the availability of journal article citation live links. Selected article citations in the Parker bibliography are now live links to digital versions of those articles, enabling Parker on the Web subscribers to quickly navigate to the full-text scholarly resources and thus expedite their research. Approximately 1200 live links are now available in the bibliography. This functionality requires an institutional subscription to each vendor's journal database. This new feature is only available to Parker on the Web subscribers.

The image depicted above is from Parker Manuscript 8, with the accompanying explanation of significance, below, provided by Christopher de Hamel, Parker Librarian, Corpus Christi College, Cambridge University.

The month of May was the traditional time for love, in medieval custom and romantic literature.The earliest surviving Anglo-Norman love-song is a chance survival of part of a mid-thirteenth-century parchment sheet which was re-used as a flyleaf at the end of a later manuscript of the Speculum historiale of Vincent of Beauvais. It preserves a polyphonic setting for three voices, opening approximately, ‘Would you hear the said story, how Guyot wastes his effort, for his lady love, who is too distant from him? [Night] and day he goes imploring her not to be unkind’, with the refrain, “Mes amerousette, / Douce camousette, / Kar éez pité / De vos amourettes”, ‘My dearest love, Sweet snub-nosed one, Take pity on your lover!” Parker Library MS 8, fol.i, verso.

 

The Undergraduate Theses collections for Physics and Engineering Physics are now open for deposit. This year’s crop of top undergraduates in the Department of Physics and in the Engineering Physics program have the distinction of being the first undergrads to deposit their theses in the SDR. These two are the first of several honors theses collections opening this quarter. (The School of Education is assembling their collection together now, and two other departments may follow suit.)

Librarian Stella Ota manages the collections, working with faculty, staff, and the selected students to use the Self Deposit application. She has been collecting digital honors theses offline since 2010. When the ETD system launched in fall 2009, Stella had a vision for using a similar process to collect the Physics undergraduate theses for access and preservation in the SDR. Yet without a deposit interface, it proved to be challenging to track down each student, to have them sign a hard-copy deposit agreement, to collect the PDF files by thumbdrive or email, and to create the metadata. The Self Deposit workflow promises to make the whole process of collecting and archiving these works more systematic, more secure, and more efficient.

Since the Electronic Thesis and Dissertation system launched in November 2009, Stanford's PhD and Engineering graduate students have had the option to submit their culminating works either online or on paper. For many students, the choice is easy to make: electronic submission is convenient, quick, and costs nothing whereas the traditional option requires producing multiple printed copies of the thesis and paying an accompanying fee (starting at $126).

The Big Idea Festival was a big deal to the students enrolled in "Computers and Interfaces: Psychological and Societal Perspectives", an undergraduate course (Communications 169) taught by Cliff Nass in Winter 2013. The event, which took place at Stanford on March 11, was a showcase of projects produced by teams of students with the assignment to imagine and design innovative interactions between automobiles and the people who drive them.

There is the Intuition rental car, a semi-autonomous vehicle marketed to vacationers, and there is the car that never forgets. With Xpress, you can more easily share your emotions with drivers around you and rate better with insurance companies for the number of “thumbs-up” messages you receive from fellow drivers. Looking for a personalized driving experience? Try FollowMe: “Sync your phone with any new car and automatically have all of your personal preferences (ranging from auto-tinted to glass settings to your favorite radio stations) follow you!”

Clearly this is new and fertile ground for the automotive and technology industries, and you can better believe carmakers in attendance at the Festival were interested in the fresh ideas coming from the minds of today’s Stanford students. Wired magazine was there to report on it.

The Big Idea Festival is also the newest collection in the Stanford Digital Repository. Professor Nass gathered the students’ final project files and provided them, along with the event program containing some basic descriptive metadata, to SUL as a real use case for a pilot with the new SDR Self-Deposit application. A small team of DLSSers threw a “deposit party” with Regina Roberts, subject specialist for Communications, where we shared some lunch while uploading the narratives and storyboards as submitted by the students. It was a fun and quick way to get the collection’s 75 items into the repository. As a bonus, now more SUL staff have some hands-on experience with the SDR Self-Deposit software.

We will see more collections of student works coming to the SDR. This spring, students enrolled in ME310 will deposit their team projects directly in the SDR for long-term preservation and access, adding to the existing collection of digitized reports like this one in the ME310 archival collection.

The four fundamental phase transitions for compressed sensing with Gaussian matrices

When thinking about how researchers at Stanford might want to use the Stanford Digital Repository to support their work, probably the first scenario we envisioned was for publication support. And apparently we weren't the only ones.

Even before we started advertising the availability of the SDR for research data, Hatef Monajemi, a graduate student in the statistics department, came to us with just the problem we had envisioned.

Betty Grover Eisner audiotape

The Stanford Media Preservation Lab recently completed reformatting the audio tapes contained in the Betty Grover Eisner papers, held by University Archives. Eisner was at the vanguard of using LSD and other psychedelic drugs in her psychotherapy research during the 1950s and 60s. The majority of the tapes document long, multi-hour therapy sessions, with patients on mind alterting substances. Because of the content, which is often sexually explicit, these tapes are restricted; those interested patrons who want to listen to these tapes should contact the University Archivist for more information. A handful of tapes do have worldwide access however, including this cassette of a talk Eisner gave at a UCLA psychology seminar exactly 42 years ago. 

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