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Roman Imperial aureus 23 A.D.-33 A.D.

The Frank L. Kovacs Numismatic Library, undoubtedly one of the largest and most complete reference collections on ancient numismatics situated on the West coast of the U.S., is now housed at the Stanford Libraries and was immediately put to use by students and a visiting professor throughout spring-quarter seminars.

Morris Cooper Foote

Stanford has recently acquired and processed two collections from American military officers operating overseas in the early 20th century. The papers of Morris Cooper Foote (M2103) and Warren Jay Terhune (M2132) chronicle several critical episodes in Western expansionism and occupation in Asia and its responses.

Morris Cooper Foote’s papers include a variety of material (manuscripts, journals, letters, memos, reports, photographs, maps, newspapers) from his service in the United States Army’s Ninth Infantry. Most of it concerns his experiences in the Boxer Rebellion, but he was already a seasoned veteran at the time. Foote was born September 16, 1843 in New York. His great-grandfather was William Cooper, the founder of Cooperstown, and he was also related to Jacob Morris, who served in the Revolutionary War, and novelist James Fenimore Cooper.

Authorial London screenshot

Authorial London, one of the latest and greatest in a series of interactive scholarly works developed in the Stanford Libraries, is going on the road this month.  Karl Grossner, research developer in the Center for Interdisciplinary Digital Research (CIDR) and principal architect and developer of Authorial London, will be traveling to Kraków, Poland to present the project at Digital Humanities 2016, the largest international conference in the DH world.  He'll be co-presenting with Kenny Ligda, an instructional designer in the Digital Learning Design Team of the Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning (VPTL) at Stanford.

In honor of the useR! 2016 Conference taking place this week, we wanted to outline ways researchers can use the Stanford Digital Repository to power their R visualizations.

The Stanford Digital Repository allow Stanford researchers and affiliates to deposit research data for preservation, access, and discovery. Data deposited in the repository is citable and from which the original content can be downloaded. The data is then made available through open web standard services for consumption. For example, images in the repository are delivered by a IIIF-compatible service, geospatial data are served out as Web Mapping Services (WMS) and Web Feature Services (WFS), and generic files are all served through HTTP.

R users can take advantage of these web services and the data being served out.

In my role as manuscripts cataloger, I get to experience the joy of encountering new and different material every day. A recent acquisition that came across my desk was a handwritten manuscript compiled by William Hustler for Jane Fell (the two wed in 1796), titled Salmagundi: A Miscellaneous Combination of Original Poetry Consisting of Amatory, Elegiac, Sonnets, and Other Palatable Ingredients.

Stanford Chemistry Safety Portal search tool

Chemists need a wide array of information before doing experimental work in the lab.  To help them find chemical safety information they need more effectively and efficiently, a Chemical Safety Portal was created that searches multiple resources at one time.  Developed in collaboration with Deep Web Technologies, this search site includes 60+ resources. 

Water jet with x-ray pulse

When Stanford Digital Repository staff found out someone was depositing research data about using x-ray lasers to explode jets of liquid, I have to admit there was a bit of excitement. Researching explosions (even on a small scale) sounds like an immense amount of fun. But Stanford researcher Claudiu Stan and his colleagues were doing way more important things out at SLAC than just having fun. They were performing serious research into fluid dynamics.

Mbook

You are invited to attend three Mnova workshops being held this Friday, June 24th, at the Swain Library.  Please RSVP by sending email to graceb@stanford.edu

  • Session 1.  Introduction on Mbook - Online Electronic Lab Notebook for Organic Chemistry.  (9am-10am)
  • Session 2.  Training on Mnova Basic features ( 10:15-11:45 am)
  • Session 3.  Training on Mnova advanced features (1-2:30 pm)

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