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Monique Murphy, Operations Manager, Preservation Department

This week, libraries around the country will share preservation tips and stories for the American Library Association’s annual Preservation Week. You can find preservation resources, quick tips, and free webinars on the Preservation Week site covering the spectrum of collection care from textiles to personal digital archives. We will spend this week meeting some of the people that support preservation and conservation activities across Stanford Libraries. Team members from Preservation, Digital Library Systems and Services, and Special Collections have answered five questions about themselves and their work on the long-term care of our books, archives, audio-visual resources, and born-digital files.

Chemists Celebrate Earth Day logo

The latest news from the Swain Library covers the following topics:

  • Catalysis Resources
  • Keep Current with journal literature
  • Green Pocketbook
  • Chemists Celebrate Earth Day - The Great Indoors: Your Homes Ecosystem
  • Household Products Database

Aimed at providing news as quick info bytes, each topic is covered in a PowerPoint slide.   This format enables us to easily re-use this content in a digital sign at the library.  Please see: Swain Library News - 22 April 2016

Happy Earth Day 2016!

Nerd Squirrel image

This month, Stanford Libraries posted two new videos on its YouTube channel. They are targeted for new undergraduate students, and have been introduced this term to the Program in Writing and Rhetoric (PWR) students, who come to the library for workshops on information literacy. These videos are part of the department of Learning and Outreach's effort to "flip the classroom".

For your browsing pleasure, here are the Spring 2016 highlights of newly acquired collections available at the Archive of Recorded Sound.

The Chitty Chitty Bang Bang automobile from the 1968 film

A guest post from one of our Road & Track project archivists, Beaudry Allen:
There is always something unexpected to find when processing a collection. You do not have to be a car aficionado or even know the first thing about cars to at least have a slight remembrance of the car in film Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. While the memories evoked by the car may be its ability to fly or float in water, the car was based on the legendary Brooklands cars of Count Louis Vorow Zborowski. Zborowski was a famous 1920s English racing driver and automobile engineer known for building his own race cars, some of which were called “Chitty Bang Bang.” Ian Fleming was influenced by Zborowski’s engineered car and its eccentricities when he wrote the famed children’s story of the same name. When the 1968 film adaptation started, mock-ups were built in the Edwardian-style. They actually worked, but apparently in the style of the day the cars only had brakes on the rear wheels, which meant that there were no brakes if you went in reverse. So the car may not be safe for the road today - but certainly one for memory lane.
The Road & Track collection is currently being processed, but a portion of the archive is available. A preliminary guide is available here:
http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/c8j38wwz

Breviary, with neumes. Detail from Stanford Digital Repository.

These titles have recently been added to the Music Library Reference Room.  In no particular order:

 

Historical dictionary of the Broadway musical / William A. Everett, Paul R. Laird.

Bibliothecae apostolicae vaticanae corpus manuscriptorum musicalium / curantibus Rita Andolina, Susanna Greco. Vol. 2::1-4. Catalogo ragionato delle composizioni di Lorenzo Perosi (1872-1956) : con esempi musicali originali / Arturo Sacchetti. 

International who's who in classical music. 31st ed. (2015)

International who's who in popular music. 17th ed. (2015)

moonlight over river Thames“And place is always and only place,” writes T.S. Eliot. Is that true? Or is place rather the sum of human experience at a location—“the meeting up of histories” as geographer Doreen Massey has suggested? Does place in literature matter? The truth, usually, is simply that we don’t know.  When we read a place name in a text, when we learn that a writer worked at a certain address, we read on—because how much do we know of all these places?

Beethoven string quartet (detail)

For your browsing pleasure, we present the following list of new scores added to composer complete editions, historical sets, and facsimiles:

 

Modern editions

Bach, CPE. Miscellaneous songs / Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach ; edited by Christoph Wolff. 

Bach, JS. Mass in B minor / Johann Sebastian Bach ; edited by Ulrich Leisinger. Accompanying DVD-ROM includes a reproductions of the holograph (including original parts for Kyrie and Gloria), the 1924 facsimile, and 2 copyist manuscripts (Hering and Kirnberger)); it also includes the full score (as found in printed version), detailed critical report, and PDF files ("Et in unum Dominum", Individual remarks in German (not found in printed work), Latin words printed as text, and Quick start guides in German and English)

Beethoven. Streichquartette III. Werke / Beethoven (v. 6/5)

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