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Franz Kunst

We are thrilled to announce that Franz Kunst has joined our Department as a Manuscripts Processing Archivist. Please join us in welcoming him to the fold.

This is not his first appearance in Special Collections as he has been at Stanford University since 2006, when he began working as an intern at the Hoover Institute on an assessment of their audio holdings for their Radio Free Europe collection. In 2007 he joined the Manuscripts Division in Special Collections and has worked for us and the Archives of Recorded Sound on many special projects over the past nine years. Some of these have been bulk processing projects which opened up over 80 undocumented collections in the Archives of Recorded Sound and several large collections in Special Collections, including: Douglas Engelbart, Donald McQuivey, Washington Apple Pi. Additionally Franz has completed several smaller collections: Karl Cohen, Tom Law poster collection, Fred Buenzle.

 Other notable projects are: the Riverwalk Jazz Project and the Educational Collections project where he processed several major collections, such as the papers of Ruth Asawa and Gyorgy Kepes. Franz has a B.A. from UNC, Chapel Hill in American Studies and Folklore and an MLIS from San Jose State University. 

GSB in China, 2002

The Stanford University Archives is pleased to announce that it has recently acquired, and made available, two collections from the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Stanford University, Graduate School of Business, Records (SC1266)

Founded in 1925, The Stanford Graduate School of Business was formed in order to establish a West Coast alternative to the business schools of the East Coast.

Ralph Hansen, University Archivist, 1967

This summer marks the 50th anniversary of the Stanford University Archives. To celebrate, the Archives has launched a 50 day Twitter campaign featuring iconic images of Stanford. Follow us on Twitter @stanfordarchive or see all of the images posted thus far via #StanfordArchive50. This fall, the Archives will formally celebrate the anniversary with an exhibit in the East Wing of Green Library. Stay tuned for more information.

Aldine Greek Bible 1518

Stanford University Libraries is the grateful recipient of a very generous donation of some 700 individual leaves from early printed books, the gift of Donn Faber Downing and Letitia Leigh Sanders. The vast majority of these leaves are from books from the 15th and 16th centuries and serve not only as examples of which texts were being printed with this “new” technology (Gutenberg’s Bible was printed about 1455, the first book printed in the western world with moveable type) but also how these texts were presented: their typefaces, page layout, and format.  It is a remarkable, rich collection, and will be used in a wide variety of classes.

"Portraits of Success: Impressions of Silicon Valley Pioneers" (1986) book page image.

I am pleased to announce that all of the accessions in the Carolyn Caddes Papers (M0658) are now described and available for research.  For several years, only one accession was described online but thanks to Monika Lehman, our Public Services Intern, the rest of the accessions are open now for research.

Monika describes her experience processing this incredibly rich collection:

I had the opportunity to process Carolyn Caddes' papers. Carolyn is a portrait photographer who is most known for her collection of portraits published in a book entitled Portraits of Success: Impressions of Silicon Valley Pioneers (1986). Caddes spent years interviewing, photographing and researching the major players in Silicon Valley who worked in the technology sector, venture capitalism and government.

This project is a spin-off from the ongoing GAMECIP (Game Metadata and Citation Project) funded by the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS).  We are planning to spin off and expand our work on controlled platform vocabularies with additional research and photography, then publish a definitive terminology and ontology for computer game platforms in a manner that will be useful for libraries, museums, collectors and scholars. We are beginning with the most used set as an initial set.

The two core components of the project are (1) review and photography of hardware in Stanford’s Stephen M. Cabrinety Collection in the History of Microcomputing, in order to complete our assessment and provide visual aids in the published terminology guide; and (2) collation, editing and design of platform and media description sheets that will be made available online and, eventually, be available for publication in a print format.  

Branner Geological Library bookplate

The Stanford University Archives is pleased to announce a one-week exhibit of materials relating to John Casper Branner and the Branner Library. This exhibit will be on display at Branner Earth Sciences Library from June 5-12.

Items on display include photographs and other materials relating to Branner’s inauguration; photographs of Branner and family, including some taken on the Stanford campus with Thomas Edison; and materials documenting the founding of Branner Library.

This exhibit is part of the anniversary celebration commemorating the 100th year since the founding of the Branner Earth Sciences Library & Map Collections (June 14, 1915 - June 14, 2015). It is part of an ongoing series of anniversary events that culminates with a public celebration, speakers, and tour of the library on Thursday, June 11, 2015 from 4-6:30 pm.

For more information about John Casper Branner, or about any of the collection materials included in this exhibit, please contact the University Archives at archivesref@stanford.edu. 

Please join us in welcoming Michelle Paquette who started May 18th as our new manuscripts cataloging and metadata librarian. This fills a position vacated over a year ago when the former cataloger retired. While Michelle will be joining the Special Collection team at Stanford’s Redwood City campus, she won’t be a stranger to campus because part of her responsibilities will be managing metadata for our many digitization projects in collaboration with staff from the Metadata Department and DLSS, as well as curators and subject specialists.

Michelle received her Master of Science in Library Science degree from Simmons College and her Bachelor of Arts in English, summa cum laude, from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.  She was a metadata resident at Amherst College’s Frost Library where, in addition to her cataloging work, she planned and oversaw data migration projects working with MODS, Dublin Core, Darwin Core, XSLT, EAD and VRA Core. As a consultant for the Frost Library over the past year, Michelle developed a data model and metadata element set for the “Timeline of LGBT Political Landmarks in the Americas.” 

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