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Chinese door god prints; officials bringing a rise in rank and a rise in official salary circa 1900.

It is with sadness that I announce the departure of our lead processing archivist, Joe Geller, who is relocating to the east coast. He will be greatly missed by all our staff on the Redwood City campus and throughout the library.

Joe started at SUL in 2006 as a curatorial assistant for Annette Keogh, the former curator for British and American Literature. During these years, I was fortunate to work with Joe as he processed several literature collections, notably:  Irving Rosenthal papers, Rae Armantrout papers, and Edward Dahlberg papers.

Spring term will begin on March 30th and with the new term comes new hours for Special Collections and University Archives.  Our open hours for Spring term will be Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Women playing basketball on field,1900. Stanford Historical Photograph Collection (SC1071: 3293-006).

The University Archives is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibition celebrating the 25th anniversary of Stanford Women's first NCAA basketball victory.

Portrait of Ruth Asawa and wire sculptures by Nat Farbman, from 1955 Guggenheim fellowship application

After more than a year of intensive organizing and arranging, we are very proud to announce that the papers of artist and educator Ruth Asawa (M1585) are now available for research. The finding aid can be accessed from the Online Archive of Calfornia, and the collection record in the Searchworks catalog. A bibliography is also available from the Stanford Digital Repository.

The collection documents her commissions and other creative work as well her involvement in shaping civic arts and educational policy. Perhaps the greatest number of files contain correspondence from a remarkably diverse community of associates: friends, neighbors, artists, teachers, students, architects, designers, patrons, politicians, and philanthropists. She was also close to such major figures as Buckminster Fuller, Imogen Cunningham, Josef and Anni Albers, Ray Johnson, and countless others. In a sense, her papers can be considered a collection of collections. Scholars studying San Francisco history, art education pedagogy, fundraising for non-profits, public art, Japanese American Internment, or Black Mountain College will be rewarded by the collection's breadth.

Of course, there is also a great deal of information on Asawa's own art, particularly her unique wire constructions. The collection contains communication with galleries and museums, many photographs and slides, and insights on her artistic processes as included in portfolios and applications. For instance, here is some detail from an insert in her 1955 Guggenheim application. There are many of these halftone images of her crocheted wire shapes:

 detail, halftone image of Asawa wire sculptures 1955

Please stay tuned: we'll be posting a few more entries on Asawa in the weeks to come.

I'm pleased to announce that Special Collections and University Archives have a new reference email address:

specialcollections@stanford.edu

Our old email --speccollref@stanford.edu-- will sunset on May 1st.  

We are excited about this change and hope it provides our patrons better service.

ePADD

ePADD, a software package being developed by Stanford University's Special Collections & University Archives that supports archival processes around the ingest, appraisal, processing, discovery, and delivery of email archives, is undergoing significant changes in the ramp up to the first public release scheduled for late April.

I am pleased to announce that the Greet Kershaw papers, 1953-2003 (M1661), are now available for research. Kershaw was an anthropologist most known for her work with the Mau Mau and the Kikuyu. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago and was a professor of anthropology at California State University, Northridge. Kershaw advocated for applied anthropology, believing that anthropologists could do valuable work outside of academia. Her later years were spent writing articles about the Hmong diaspora in Long Beach in the 1970’s and 1980’s.

This collection was processed by our Public Services Intern, Monika Lehman, and the finding guide for the collection can be found through Searchworks:
http://searchworks.stanford.edu/view/7813101

I am pleased to announce that all of the accessions in the United Nations 4th World Conference on Women, Beijing, Papers (M0876) are now described and available for research.  The collection is 10 linear feet and consists of journals, pamphlets, press kits, conference papers and notes. The collection is ephemeral in nature and focuses on issues such as poverty, violence, armed conflict, education, economic advancement, and human rights.

Seven women who attended the conference assembled their papers together and donated the materials to Stanford's Special Collections.  For several years, only one accession was described online but thanks to Melissa Pincus, who worked for Public Services this summer, and Lucia Ibarra, who was our summer Eastside High School student, the rest of the accessions now are open for research. An updated version of the collection's finding guide is available through the collection's catalog record:



http://searchworks.stanford.edu/view/4084264

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