Special Collections Unbound

Antigone.

New exhibit celebrates 125 years of Stanford Classics

May 9, 2016
by Josh Schneider

This year, Stanford Classics turns 125, and to celebrate, we have put together an exhibit examining its early history. While small and undistinguished early on, the department quickly produced scholars of distinction. Today it is a major center of American classics, and a world leader in the study of ancient Greece and Rome. Still, the century and a quarter that intervenes between us and its foundation is often a sort of ever-advancing black box—that is, we seldom have an institutional memory that extends any further back than the recollection of the faculty's most senior member. Earlier outlines of the department's history are therefore simply lost. This exhibit hopes to shed some light on that earlier place and time.

El Pajarillo Errante

Color Our Collections: José Guadalupe Posada

January 28, 2016
by Michelle Paquette

Next week, from Feburary 1-February 5, archives are joining the adult coloring craze with #ColorOurCollections, providing coloring pages made from materials held within their special collections. We're joining in while simultaneously celebrating some newly released digitized material from the José Guadalupe Posada collection, circa 1875-1913. 

Janet Sakai moving from Special Collections to Acquisitions

January 13, 2016
by Glynn Edwards
After many productive years in the Department of Special Collections & University Archives, Janet Sakai is moving to a new position in Acquisitions. Janet joined us fourteen years ago as an administrative assistant to Roberto Trujillo, the Field Curator of Special Collections, but quickly demonstrated her talents as a cataloger.
"Carry On" by James M. Robb

WWII POW manuscript written in captivity now available online

January 11, 2016
by Daniel Hartwig

The University Archives is pleased to announce that it has digitized a remarkable manuscript, "Carry On," written by James M. Robb ('31), a WWII POW who survived the Bataan Death March. The manuscript, written while Robb was a patient at the Bilibid prison-hospital in the Philippines, was buried in a canister under floorboards in a building in the prison by Warrant Officer Earl G. Schweizer, who is referred to often in the manuscript and who was apparently a good friend of James's in the camp.

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