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Authorial London screenshot

Authorial London, one of the latest and greatest in a series of interactive scholarly works developed in the Stanford Libraries, is going on the road this month.  Karl Grossner, research developer in the Center for Interdisciplinary Digital Research (CIDR) and principal architect and developer of Authorial London, will be traveling to Kraków, Poland to present the project at Digital Humanities 2016, the largest international conference in the DH world.  He'll be co-presenting with Kenny Ligda, an instructional designer in the Digital Learning Design Team of the Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning (VPTL) at Stanford.

In honor of the useR! 2016 Conference taking place this week, we wanted to outline ways researchers can use the Stanford Digital Repository to power their R visualizations.

The Stanford Digital Repository allow Stanford researchers and affiliates to deposit research data for preservation, access, and discovery. Data deposited in the repository is citable and from which the original content can be downloaded. The data is then made available through open web standard services for consumption. For example, images in the repository are delivered by a IIIF-compatible service, geospatial data are served out as Web Mapping Services (WMS) and Web Feature Services (WFS), and generic files are all served through HTTP.

R users can take advantage of these web services and the data being served out.

For example, the Spatial History Project at Stanford has a really interesting visualization about the slave market in 19th century Rio de Janerio. The project also submitted their data to SDR which provides a PURL, located at https://purl.stanford.edu/wt635jq5834

The data is made available through HTTP from a performant cached location. This allows R users to use the RCurl package to directly access the data and start creating visualizations. Here is an example in four lines of R that recreates a histogram used in the original visualization.

 R plot using SDR

This is one example using the HTTP web services provided by SDR. For large datasets there is also the ability to stream to help with performance. For geospatial datasets residing in SDR you could also use the rwfs package to create other types of visualizations using the WFS services.

In my role as manuscripts cataloger, I get to experience the joy of encountering new and different material every day. A recent acquisition that came across my desk was a handwritten manuscript compiled by William Hustler for Jane Fell (the two wed in 1796), titled Salmagundi: A Miscellaneous Combination of Original Poetry Consisting of Amatory, Elegiac, Sonnets, and Other Palatable Ingredients.

Stanford Chemistry Safety Portal search tool

Chemists need a wide array of information before doing experimental work in the lab.  To help them find chemical safety information they need more effectively and efficiently, a Chemical Safety Portal was created that searches multiple resources at one time.  Developed in collaboration with Deep Web Technologies, this search site includes 60+ resources. 

Water jet with x-ray pulse

When Stanford Digital Repository staff found out someone was depositing research data about using x-ray lasers to explode jets of liquid, I have to admit there was a bit of excitement. Researching explosions (even on a small scale) sounds like an immense amount of fun. But Stanford researcher Claudiu Stan and his colleagues were doing way more important things out at SLAC than just having fun. They were performing serious research into fluid dynamics.

Mbook

You are invited to attend three Mnova workshops being held this Friday, June 24th, at the Swain Library.  Please RSVP by sending email to graceb@stanford.edu

  • Session 1.  Introduction on Mbook - Online Electronic Lab Notebook for Organic Chemistry.  (9am-10am)
  • Session 2.  Training on Mnova Basic features ( 10:15-11:45 am)
  • Session 3.  Training on Mnova advanced features (1-2:30 pm)

Revolution annuelle de la terre autour du soleil. Compose et dessine par H Nicollet. Le texte de les fig. suppl. par E. Soulier. Paris, publie par J. Andriveau-Goujon, Rue du Bac, no. 17, 1850.

About this series

Over the next few weeks I will post a series of brief step-by-step "how-to" tutorials on making use of digital resources from the David Rumsey Map Center and Collection, that I presented in my "Hacking Rumsey" talk, presented at the opening events for The David Rumsey Map Center, at Stanford University Library.

We're starting small, with the easiest tools (like the David Rumsey Map Collection MapTab Chrome Browser Plug-in, which I covered in a previous post) that appeal to the most people, first. Eventually we will work our way up through more complex use of the collections and tools available from The Stanford University Library.

Claude Monet, Impression Sunrise (1872)

For your browsing pleasure, we present the following list of new scores added to composer complete editions, historical sets, and facsimiles.

Modern editions

CPE Bach. Flute concertos, vol. II. Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach ; edited by Barthold Kuijken (Works, series III, vol. 4:2)

Cavalli. Orione / Francesco Cavalli ; dramma per musica by Francesco Melosio.

Chabrier. L'Étoile : opéra bouffe en trois actes / Emmanuel Chabrier.

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