Stanford Libraries Blog

2017 NGAC membership

National Geospatial Advisory Committee spring meeting

April 5, 2017
by Julie Sweetkind-Singer

The National Geospatial Advisory Committee (NGAC) held its first meeting of the year in Washington, D.C. on March 21-22, 2017.  The NGAC is a Federal Advisory Committee (FACA) to the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC).  The role of the NGAC is to provide advice and recommendations related to the national geospatial program and the development of the National Spatial Data Infrastructure.

New shelving in ARS

April 5, 2017
by Frank Ferko

At long last, the Archive of Recorded Sound will receive some much-needed new shelving, and the installation work will begin this summer with preparatory shifting of archival materials beginning on May 1st.  During the summer and fall much of the old shelving will be removed and new shelving will be installed.  The project is scheduled for completion in December.

Aida in Paris at the Théâtre Italien, 1876

April 3, 2017
by Mimi Tashiro

At the December 7, 2015 auction at Sotheby’s London, the Stanford Libraries acquired a manuscript copy of Giuseppe Verdi’s opera Aida, used for the performances at the Théâtre Italien in Paris in 1876. The manuscript, which will be housed in the Department of Special Collections, was the focus of a seminar, Music 310: Aida in Paris (and Beyond) taught by Professor Heather Hadlock of the Music Department in Fall 2016. Seminar participants were Kelly Christensen, Kirstin Haag, Michael Kinney, Tyler Mitchell, Ben Ory and David Wilson.

Mis Madres poster

Immigrants, refugees and borders: April book exhibit

April 3, 2017
by Regina Lee Roberts

Stanford University Libraries has a monthly book exhibit of circulating books in Green Library in order to highlight special topics. For April 2017, librarians in the social sciences, humanities and area studies have curated a sample of selected resources on "Immigration, Refugees and Borders". The image of "Mis Madres" by Ester Hernandez is from the Stanford Libraries' Special Collections M1301 and is reproduced here courtesy of the artist.

Lockss logo

Changing LOCKSS

March 22, 2017
by Nicholas Taylor

You may already know the story of LOCKSS’ beginnings (PDF).

On a fall day in 1999, a hike in the woods became the backdrop for a spontaneous problem-solving session on the preservation gap affecting online journals. The hikers, an electronic serials librarian (Vicky Reich) and a computer scientist (David Rosenthal), sketched out a plan to replicate the incidentally distributed, redundant architecture by which print journals had been preserved, in a digital system. They brought the proposal to the Stanford University Librarian, Michael Keller, who famously blessed the project with the admonition, “don’t cost me any money; don’t get me into trouble; do what you want.”

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