You are here

Stanford Libraries Blog

RSS

Archives

IA - The future is here!

A month ago on October 24th (computer geeks  know this number 1024 as 2^10), staff and friends of the Internet Archive (IA) converged at archive.org's 300 Funston Avenue offices for an annual celebration of their mission to provide access to a free, safe and open internet. IA's founder, Brewster Kahle, spoke of recent milestones such as the growth of the data set to 15 Petabytes up from just a few last year, and the launch of the TV News archive. Other highlights included the new (and largest collection) of vintage software; eliminating the 404 Error from browsers; improvements on the WayBack Machine; an expanded emulator - MESS; and the growing size of their hard copy collection arising from individual donations. Let us explore a few of these.

TV News

This service enables users to search TV news for phrases found in past broadcasts. One can quote, save, and even share search results. IA will be receiving a donation of 140,000 tapes containing 35 years of TV history, and dating back to the 1970s. This is the Marion Stokes collection of TV news. 

Stereoselective synthesis of drugs and natural products

Noteworthy online reference works of potential interest include:

  • Comprehensive enantioselective organocatalysis: Catalysts, reactions, and applications
  • Encyclopedia of membrane science and technology
  • Stereoselective synthesis of drugs and natural products
  • UV/Vis+ Spectra data base

A view of the Bing Wing entrance of the Cecil H. Green Library

The entry turnstiles and other building-access card readers in Cecil H. Green Library will be upgraded during Thanksgiving Recess, starting Monday, November 25, 2013.

The new cards will have the required proximity chip that will unlock the turnstiles. You will be able to hover your card over a sensor to unlock the turnstile or open a door. The reader is sensitive enough that you will likely be able to keep your card in your wallet or bag but still have it read by the sensor.

How do I know if I need a new card?

If your university ID card was issued in 2005 or earlier, please go to the Campus Card Office for a free replacement card that will have a proximity chip in it that will provide you access to the library and gym's new card readers. If your library-only SUL card was issued before October 10, 2013, please go to the Privileges Desk in Cecil H. Green Library for a replacement card. Bring a valid government ID for all card replacements.

Still not sure? Questions?
 

 

Image from Tom Law Poster Collection

The Tom Law San Francisco Bay Area Punk and Rock Handbill and Poster Collection was recently acquired and is housed in Special Collections, Green Library. It contains approximately 1400 original posters of Punk Rock Band performances in the San Francisco Bay area.

Amerique  (for more, go to: http://purl.stanford.edu/sr890jc8685)

Author Rebecca Solnit was co-sponsored by the Stanford University Libraries and the Bill Lane Center for the American West as a visiting researcher and spent time with us during the Winter and Spring of 2013. During this time, she explored the library's newly acquired collection of historic maps that curiously depict California as an island off the West coast of North America. In a recent article she reports on her time here at Stanford in an article entitled  "An Island Is Anything Surrounded By Difference: Thoughts on Maps and History." In the article she refers to her earlier connection with California's maps when she worked on her atlas of San Francisco and reminisces about talking to David Rumsey who had first mentioned to her about Glen McLaughlin and his collection of Maps of California as an Island. Her article is well worth a read, stirs up your interest in this cartographic phenomenon, and whets the appetite for more. For more on her, visit her profile here and to view the collection please visit the collection available via the library catalog. 

 

CrossMark logo

"What happens when the record of scholarly research published in journals, books, proceedings or other documents changes? As careful as authors, reviewers, and publishers are in the publication process, corrections, updates, errata, and even retractions and withdrawals are sometimes necessary. But how can researchers find out about these important changes?" Learn more about CrossMark. Please also see this press release: CrossRef Members add over a quarter million CrossMark records; Researchers click on CrossMark logos 50K times per month (November 13, 2013)

Percentage of Americans who believe global warming has been happening.

The Stanford Geospatial Center has created a series of maps in support of the work of Professor Jon Krosnick who released new state level data on Americans' view of climate change.  Dr. Krosnick, a senior fellow with the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, presented the findings to the congressional Bicameral Task Force on Climate Change.  The Stanford Report released an article on November 13, 2014 discussing Dr. Krosnick's work, which shows that the majority of residents in every state surveyed supported government limits on greenhouse gas emissions, tax breaks to encourage solar power production, and energy efficient appliances. 


Twelve maps were produced by Patricia Carbajales and David Medeiros, both of the Stanford Geospatial Center located in Branner Library.  The maps include visual representations on a state by state basis of the answers to such questions as whether or not global warming has been happening and if it has been caused by humans.  As if often the case, these visualizations allow for enhanced understanding of complex spatial data quickly through the use of a map of the United States.

Graduate students work on a presentation

We are pleased to announce the November 2013 digital issue of the Terman Engineering Library News. 

In the news this month:

  • New Resource Added – NewSpace Global
  • IDC Research is Now Online
  • IBIS World Forecasting
  • IEEE Open Access Mega Journal
  • Knovel Launches 25,000 New Interactive Tables
  • New in Web of Science!

Download and read the full issue in digital format.

 

Pages