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Percentage of Americans who believe global warming has been happening.

The Stanford Geospatial Center has created a series of maps in support of the work of Professor Jon Krosnick who released new state level data on Americans' view of climate change.  Dr. Krosnick, a senior fellow with the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, presented the findings to the congressional Bicameral Task Force on Climate Change.  The Stanford Report released an article on November 13, 2014 discussing Dr. Krosnick's work, which shows that the majority of residents in every state surveyed supported government limits on greenhouse gas emissions, tax breaks to encourage solar power production, and energy efficient appliances. 


Twelve maps were produced by Patricia Carbajales and David Medeiros, both of the Stanford Geospatial Center located in Branner Library.  The maps include visual representations on a state by state basis of the answers to such questions as whether or not global warming has been happening and if it has been caused by humans.  As if often the case, these visualizations allow for enhanced understanding of complex spatial data quickly through the use of a map of the United States.

Graduate students work on a presentation

We are pleased to announce the November 2013 digital issue of the Terman Engineering Library News. 

In the news this month:

  • New Resource Added – NewSpace Global
  • IDC Research is Now Online
  • IBIS World Forecasting
  • IEEE Open Access Mega Journal
  • Knovel Launches 25,000 New Interactive Tables
  • New in Web of Science!

Download and read the full issue in digital format.

 

Victor- Victrola - Credenza (1925). This phonograph featured the largest horn Victor had built to date and was often used to demonstrate the quality of orthophonic reproduction.

The Archive of Recorded Sound recently held its first ever listening party on October 17th. We were thrilled to welcome over 40 attendees to the event here at the Archive, who were invited to flick through multiple boxes of duplicate 78rpm records, dating from approximately 1900-1940, to select those they would like to hear played on our 1925 Victrola Credenza, just one example from our magnificent phonograph collection here at the Archive which dates from 1904-1930. More details about this collection, including images and demonstration videos, are now available on our website

xSearch enables Stanford students and researchers to search multiple resources at one time.  The 250+ resources in xSearch include abstracts and indexes, full-text ejournal and ebook sites, patents, technical reports, reference materials, plus more.  In September 2013, a test version with an new interface and more content became available.  Check it out and let us know what you think.  Go to xSearch-test

Stanford Mendicants 1976/1977 - Album Cover

Ahead of their 50th anniversary show this Saturday (October 26th) at the Bing Concert Hall, I am very pleased to announce the successful recent completion of a 6 month project aimed at archiving and digitally preserving the Stanford Mendicants' complete recorded output between 1964-2012.

What’s Cooking at the UN? United Nations Day 2013

Join us to mark United Nations Day 2013!

What’s Cooking at the UN? Cookbooks, Food Programs and Policies of the United Nations
 
Thursday, October 24, 2013, 1:00 to 2:00 pm
Green Library, SSRC Seminar Room (Bing Wing, Room 121A)
 
Program:

• Welcome and Introduction of UN Day and the Food Theme

• Brief History of UN Food Programs (1906 to the present) through the library collections

• "Can I have your recipe?" -- UN cookbooks on display
 
• Let’s Eat! (time to enjoy the food from our library staff!)
 
For more information, contact Kris Kasianovitz (krisk11@stanford.edu).

We're delighted to announce that Stanford Libraries is now a member of the Center for Research Libraries - Global Forum Network. This greatly expands the gamut of research materials that are available to the entire Stanford community.

CRL is a partnership of more than 275 university, college, and independent research libraries. For 60-plus years CRL has acquired and preserved newspapers, journals, documents, archives, and other traditional and digital resources from a global network of sources, and made them available to member institutions through interlibrary loan and electronic delivery.

The Center for Research Libraries provide approximately five million publications, archives, and collections and one million digital resources to its member libraries to supplement their own humanities, science, and social science holdings. CRL has in-depth holdings that support research in history of science, economics, law and government, immigration and population studies, international diplomacy, cultural studies, and more. In addition, a partnership with the Linda Hall Library of Science, Engineering and Technology offers access to tens of thousands of scarce journal titles (many of them in foreign languages) to CRL members.

CRL materials can be obtained for extended loan periods and at no cost by users affiliated with member libraries. CRL resources include:

  • 6,500 international newspapers, many dating to the 1700s—the largest collection of circulating newspapers in North America.
  • 4,500 U.S. newspapers, many dating to the colonial era, including 2,000 ethnic titles. Foreign journals rarely held in U.S. libraries.
  • More than 800,000 foreign dissertations.
  • Area Studies: major microform and paper collections from Africa, Latin America, Middle East, Europe, Asia, Southeast Asia, and many other areas.
  • Access to the Linda Hall Library’s science, technology, and engineering serials.
  • Access to the Law Library Microform Consortium's (LLMC) digital resources.

 

For background on the Center for Research Libraries visit its website and to see what exactly is in their collection, go to the CRL online catalog.

The NYTimes.com academic passes work with ANY computer or device. The app, however, works at Stanford only with Windows Phone, iPhone, BlackBerry 10, and Android-power phones, not iPads. Please try it out at: nytimes.com/passes for 24 hour passes. Here's the FAQ.

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