Stanford Libraries Blog

Cover image of Dreaming in Indian : contemporary Native American voices

Indigenous People's Day?

October 10, 2016
by Kathryn M Kerns

According to NPR there is momentum in a movement to replace Columbus Day with  Indigenous People's Day.  If you wish to celebrate today in that way, we have books for you. 

Oinousses main settlement

Ravel's lively Greek songs

October 6, 2016
by Ray Heigemeir

Tout Gai!, original manuscript by Maurice Ravel (1875-1937); traditional Greek text from the island of Chios, French translation by Michel-Dimitri Calvocoressi; No. 5 of Cinq Mélodies populaires grecques.
Memorial Library of Music, MLM 864
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Guest blogger: Kirstin Haag

Maurice Ravel was known as France’s premier living composer in the 1920s and ‘30s, but his early career was not without challenges. By 1900, Ravel had flunked out of his courses at the Conservatoire de Paris not once, but twice. By 1905, he had failed to win the Prix de Rome no less than five times. However, in the wake of these career hardships, Ravel orchestrated several Greek songs that would become some of his most beloved recital pieces.

National Geospatial Advisory Group Holds Fall Meeting

October 2, 2016
by Julie Sweetkind-Singer

The National Geospatial Advisory Committee (NGAC) held its fall meeting at the National Conservation Training Center near Shepherdstown, West Virginia on September 27-28, 2016.  The NGAC is a Federal Advisory Committee (FACA) to the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC).  The role of the NGAC is to provide advice and recommendations related to the national geospatial program and the development of the National Spatial Data Infrastructure.  Full minutes of the meeting, PowerPoints, and lightning talks will be available on the NGAC website shortly.  

We-tripantu, Cunco, 2014. Hector González de Cunco Photographs

Chile at the Stanford Libraries

September 20, 2016
by Adan Griego

Stanford's libraries house an extensive collection on various aspects of Chilean culture. The personal library of Fernando Alegría, leading exile figure and Stanford professor for over 30 years, gives it in-depth humanities coverage with over 2900 unique titles of chapbooks, first editions and other literary publications. Items are located in the circulating collection with the more rare/unique placed in Special Collections. In addition, the 100 boxes containing Alegria's literary archive document many of the country's socio-political and cultural events before the 1973 coup as well as the exile years. The Hoover Archives also hold several collections from these years.

Helen Newton Harrison

Harrisons' monograph joins recent flurry of publications on artists in SUL collections

September 15, 2016
by Peter P Blank

Today I received a copy of The Time of the Force Majeure: After 45 years, Counterforce is on the Horizon (Munich: Prestel, 2016), a major title on Helen and Newton Harrison, celebrated artists in what has become known as the Eco Art movement. With six critical essays this 464 page retrospective monograph covers their remarkable shared studio practice of forty-five plus years. SUL acquired the Helen & Newton Harrison papers in 2010.

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