Stanford Libraries Blog

Aida manuscript detail

Aida in Paris at the Théâtre Italien, 1876

April 3, 2017
by Mimi Tashiro

At the December 7, 2015 auction at Sotheby’s London, the Stanford Libraries acquired a manuscript copy of Giuseppe Verdi’s opera Aida, used for the performances at the Théâtre Italien in Paris in 1876. The manuscript, which will be housed in the Department of Special Collections, was the focus of a seminar, Music 310: Aida in Paris (and Beyond) taught by Professor Heather Hadlock of the Music Department in Fall 2016. Seminar participants were Kelly Christensen, Kirstin Haag, Michael Kinney, Tyler Mitchell, Ben Ory and David Wilson.

Mis Madres poster

Immigrants, refugees and borders: April book exhibit

April 3, 2017
by Regina Lee Roberts

Stanford University Libraries has a monthly book exhibit of circulating books in Green Library in order to highlight special topics. For April 2017, librarians in the social sciences, humanities and area studies have curated a sample of selected resources on "Immigration, Refugees and Borders". The image of "Mis Madres" by Ester Hernandez is from the Stanford Libraries' Special Collections M1301 and is reproduced here courtesy of the artist.

Billie Bousman is retiring

April 1, 2017
by Regina Lee Roberts

Over the past 35 years, Billie Bousman has served the Stanford community well, as a Library Assistant working for many curators and bibliographers in the social sciences. In this capacity, she worked on a wide range of projects and collection development tasks. For many years, Billie worked at the Green Library Information Center responding to research questions and has always split her time working between Green Library and Cubberley Library at the Stanford Graduate School of Education. Her commitment to Stanford and her work is deeply appreciated. We wish her well in her next endeavors.

Lockss logo

Changing LOCKSS

March 22, 2017
by Nicholas Taylor

You may already know the story of LOCKSS’ beginnings (PDF).

On a fall day in 1999, a hike in the woods became the backdrop for a spontaneous problem-solving session on the preservation gap affecting online journals. The hikers, an electronic serials librarian (Vicky Reich) and a computer scientist (David Rosenthal), sketched out a plan to replicate the incidentally distributed, redundant architecture by which print journals had been preserved, in a digital system. They brought the proposal to the Stanford University Librarian, Michael Keller, who famously blessed the project with the admonition, “don’t cost me any money; don’t get me into trouble; do what you want.”

Carl Maria von Weber

Weber’s vocal works: More than just Der Freischütz

March 7, 2017
by Ray Heigemeir

Carl Maria von Weber, 6 Lieder und Gesänge, op. 66

Memorial Library of Music, MLM 1141

Guest blogger: David Wilson

Carl Maria von Weber is remembered today primarily for his opera Der Freischütz, almost to the exclusion of all else. Yet Weber was, in fact, a prolific, and widely respected composer—even Chopin, a notoriously cantankerous critic of other composers, admired Weber’s work. His compositional output includes several symphonies, chamber music, piano music, and dozens of art songs. While a few of the examples of this latter category are still performed today, many of Weber’s songs are almost completely unknown to contemporary audiences.