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Finding the best tool for your research and using it efficiently is a challenge for all students.  The Stanford Libraries offer workshops to help you increase your skill level and explore new resources.  Sign-up to learn about citation management tools such as Mendeley, EndNote and RefWorks as well as how to search for grants, patents, chemical information, energy information and how to keep current with new research.  This year we have added a new workshop on tips and tools for publishing. The Stanford Geospatial Center in the Branner Library offers workshops on GIS data creation and management, GPS and mobile data collection and ArcGIS.  All workshops are free and all Stanford students, faculty and staff are welcome.  Workshops are held in the Green Library, Swain Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Library, Branner Earth Sciences Library and the Huang Engineering Center. View the list of Fall 2014 workshops and sign-up.

Steinway Red Welte (1922), detail

In support of a major initiative to bring attention to the study of roll playing musical instruments, the Stanford Archive of Recorded Sound and Department of Music have acquired the Denis Condon Collection of Reproducing Pianos and Rolls, a collection of over 7500 rolls and ten players. The Condon Collection has long been known as one of the most important collections of reproducing pianos and piano rolls in private hands. Leading figures in the field of rolls and players are working along with Stanford faculty and staff on the project. The initiative will include roll preservation through scanning and digitization, restoration of instruments for playback, item level cataloging to allow for content discovery, and research into under-represented or rare systems and rolls. Plans for the collection include making streaming audio files of the recordings available to the public at large.

ORCID logo

Is your research confused with others who have a similar name as yours? Do you have problems distinguishing between authors with similar names?

As an author or  researcher you need to be able to easily and uniquely attach your identity to your scholarly output including datasets, articles, books, citations, and experiments.  You want to be sure you are recognized for the great work you do! The best solution is to register for your personal ORCID id to claim your publications and connect your scholarly contributions.

Dear all,

The East Asia Library of Stanford University will reopen to the public at its new location in Lathrop Library on Monday, September 15, 2014. In addition to three floors of stacks, the new East Asia Library possesses several conference, seminar, and group study rooms, numerous sofas, chairs, and desks under sunny windows, large exhibit spaces, state-of-the-art technology including dual-boot MAC/Windows computers and a latest-generation microfilm reader, and a newly established special collection. This beautiful facility will provide a new level of service to the faculty and students in East Asian studies both on Stanford campus and beyond. We look forward to welcoming you in our new library soon.

Best wishes,
Jidong Yang, Ph.D.
Head, East Asia Library
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

Yesterday, (Sunday, September 7, 2014), SearchWorks 3.0 was released. This marks a near-complete rewrite of the SearchWorks application, and the first major update to the look and feel of SearchWorks in four years. With the new release come numerous enhancements to the Stanford Libraries' catalog. Highlights of the new features include...

Mobile-friendly

The new SearchWorks interface is optimized for any size screen--from phone to tablet to laptop to cinema-sized display. Fonts and line spacing have been enhanced to work for touch navigation on small screens, and "jump to" links and expandable menus have been added in key places to assist with navigation for users on any device. 

Search results 

Search results pages now feature more information, and more actionable information, to help patrons accomplish key tasks more quickly. An expandable panel reveals summary information with a single click, letting users browse more easily across large result sets. Brief location information is available at a glance, and detailed information (including location, call number, availability and request links when applicable) with a single click.  

Gallery view & Brief view

In addition to the normal view, search results now also include an updated "gallery view" (for a page of thumbnail images) and "brief view" (for a concise list of titles, call numbers and locations). Each of these presents an expandable "preview" pane that provides more information on any item with a single click--all without leaving the search results screen. 

Detailed record view

The detailed record view has been dramatically updated, and factors in several years of user feedback and usability study. The record view has been reduced to a simpler two-column layout with a logical information flow; jump-to links make it easy to navigate very long records. The display of item location (with request links, where applicable) has been streamlined, and location information now links to each holding library's web page on the Stanford Libraries website, along with Today's Hours (also powered by the library website). 

Browse related items

For several years, one of SearchWorks' key features has been the ability to "browse by call number", and view similarly classified items regardless of where they are physically shelved. This feature was often overlooked, however, as it was tucked into the left-most corner of the detailed record view. With SearchWorks 3.0, this information is now prominently displayed at the bottom of each record page with a scrolling film strip.

Integration with the Library website

Integrating the information and services from the Libraries' website with SearchWorks was a major design objective. In addition to crosslinking library web pages and hours (see above), patrons can now open up a "chat with a librarian" session when offering feedback, or if they hit zero search results. The main navigation of Library.stanford.edu is available from an expandable menu in SearchWorks' top menu. 

Digital collections

Digital collections have a much improved display in SearchWorks, reflecting SUL's rapidly growing materials in this space. In addition to being able to browse across all digital collections easily, viewing collection details and searching within a collection is now easier and richer than ever. See the Bob Fitch photo archive record or search within it, for examples. 

New "resource type" and "media type" facets

The "format" facet in the previous version of SearchWorks had a somewhat uneven mix of resource types (e..g., "image"), media type (e.g., "microformats") and genre (e.g., "thesis"), including less than helpful or antiquated categories, like "other" and "computer file". The new SearchWorks now breaks these into different facet families: Resource Type features human-friendly categories for items by which patrons might typically search (book, dataset, image, map, newspaper, etc.) while Media Type indicates the physical container of the object (microfilm, DVD, CD, Blu-Ray, etc.). 

Advanced Search

The Advanced Search page has been simplified, with updated instructions on power search techniques (AND, +, truncation and wildcarding, e.g.)

Zero results page

When searches can't find any matches, the zero results page now offers suggested alternate searches that might have some results, as well as helpful links to other sources, such as WorldCat or "Chat with a Librarian". 

In addition to all of the above, there are numerous other features and enhancements throughout the application. The redesign also positions SearchWorks to add new functionality in the future, including more "browse" views, article / finding aid / website search, and augmenting records with more data.

The redevelopment effort also had the happy effect of reducing the total amount of code in SearchWorks, increasing the test coverage and number of team members capable of contributing to SearchWorks, increasing the amount of shared code with Blacklight (the open source application on which SearchWorks is based).

The SearchWorks team will continue to make enhancements and monitor feedback related to the release over the coming weeks and months. 

Music manuscript facsimiles

On display in the Music Library are a variety of facsimiles of musical manuscripts. Items range from a meticulous reproduction of the 15th-century Chansonnier de Jean de Montchenu, a heart-shaped collection of courtly love songs worked with gilt and fine hand illustrations, to a very convincing replica of the notebook page upon which Kurt Cobain penned lyrics for the iconic song Smells Like Teen Spirit.

Lithograph image, Recolte du café by Rugendas Johann Moritz, 1802-1858

The Stanford Libraries hold one of the most comprehensive Braziliana collections in North America. Research interests in the region date back to the university’s early years with noted  geology professor John Casper Branner.  Before coming to campus in 1891 he had participated in two scientific expeditions to Brazil and would lead two other such important research field trips in 1899 and 1907. Cultural exchanges between Stanford and Brazil continue to this day. (1)

The collection is rich in pre-1900 travel accounts (200+ titles) and includes such rare treasures as Jean de Léry's Histoire d’un voyage fait en la terre du Brésil (1585) and Maurice Rugendas’ Voyage pittoresque dans le Brésil (1835). Lery's account of a year spent living among the Tupinamba Indians is considered a masterpiece of early modern ethnography and the rich visual imagery of Rugendas documented landscapes, fauna and flora in 1820s Brazil. 

The Stanford Libraries are poised to release a substantial upgrade to SearchWorks, the libraries' catalog. Several quarters in the making, SearchWorks 3.0 will be released this month (September 2014) and is a near-complete rewrite of the SearchWorks application. With it, our objectives are to...

  1. make it mobile friendly
  2. address known usability issues with the current SearchWorks
  3. provide more space for additional information in records, and new views over time
  4. give a more seamless flow between SearchWorks and the information and services on library.stanford.edu
  5. make the new user interface an intuitive and continuous progression for current users

The last major update to SearchWorks' look and feel was for version 1.9, in September of 2010; the new upgrade also provides a chance to refresh the application's user experience. 

You can preview the upcoming release at http://searchworks-new.stanford.edu; this site has slightly old data, and will be available until the release, scheduled for next week. If you have any comments, questions or bugs to report, please send them in via the Feedback link in the top right hand corner of the application.

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