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Cover image of What really happened to Humpty

Cubberley Education Library has mysteries for children and young adults in its curriculum and textbook collections.  A new topic guide features some of them.  Come check them out.

Students studying, 2010.

 

We are pleased to announce the April 2015 digital issue of the Terman Engineering Library News.


In the news this month:

  • Did You Miss Gear Up Day?
  • Overleaf Workshops – Collaborate with LaTeX
  • Elsevier Research Dashboard for Authors
  • Search Knovel from within Excel!
  • BrowZine Integration with EndNote
  • New Knovel Content – Revised Composite Materials Handbook
  • Inspec Adds 15 Millionth Record


Read the full newsletter online.

Brahms-Handel Variations, detail

For your browsing pleasure, we present the following list of new scores added to composer complete editions, historical sets, and facsimiles:

 

Modern editions: 

 

Bach, CPE. Keyboard concertos from manuscript sources.  III / Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach ; edited by Barbara Wiermann.

Beethoven. Festspiele von 1812 und 1822.  Werke / Beethoven ; herausgegeben von Beethoven-Archiv, Bonn, unter Leitung von Joseph Schmidt-Görg.

Elgar. The concertos (second edition) Elgar complete edition. Borough Green, Kent : Novello, c1981-<c2014 >

English keyboard music c.1600-1625 / edited by Alan Brown.

Amazing "Library Titles" Race for library instruction

“The Ass is Dead! Long Live the Ass!”

Do I have your attention?

Good. That is the point of a library instruction workshop game that requires students to unscramble a book title, search the catalog to find its location, and retrieve it from the shelves. “The Rebellion of The Beasts: Or, the Ass is Dead! Long Live the Ass!” is a sample title.

Stanford University Libraries (SUL) supports the Program in Writing and Rhetoric (PWR) by offering library instruction workshops that include a walking tour of the library as well as an introduction to library resources. These library workshops are designed to support PWR’s objective to guide students in developing analytical and research-based argument skills. The library workshops are usually just a one-shot class that lasts 1 hour and 50 minutes; this is the duration of most classes.

Cover image of The new kid on the block

April is National Poetry Month and this year poets.org is encouraging young people in grades five through twelve to write letters in response to poems written and read by award winning poets who serve on the Academy of American Poets Board of Chancellors. You can find more information at their site.

In addition, Cubberley is highlighting some wonderful poets who write for children. Come see our display or check out our guide to Poetry for children and young adults.

Data Day logo

We are pleased to announce that Data Day 2015 will be made available live via BlueJeans!

On the morning of the event, click here to authenticate into BlueJeans using your SUNet ID. This service is only available to individuals with a Stanford ID. Up to 100 people will be able to watch the event from 8:30am to 1:00pm. First come, first served!

Nearly 250 people signed up within 48 hours of the announcement of the event, which will take place April 13, 2015 at the Li Ka Shing Conference Center at Stanford.

Student, instructor and library staff battle zombies on xBox

Friday April 3, 2015
Media Center, Green Library
PWR Instructor: Kathleen Tarr
Assigned Class Librarian: Felicia Smith

Green Library recently hosted Program in Writing and Rhetoric (PWR) office hours for a Zombie Tournament in the Media Center to build relationships between students, instructors and librarians. This particular session had a stress relief component and was a fun way to introduce students to Green Library’s media resources. It allowed students to get help with their PWR assignment from their instructor, in a fun atmosphere. It also allowed students to meet librarians in a relaxed setting and build rapport. Hopefully, this will reduce any anxiety when approaching librarians for assistance at the Information Center Desk.

Women have been involved in the School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences from the early days of the university.  In the beginning a few intrepid women navigated their way through an environment not designed for them.  They were not allowed in the field with the men and were sometimes treated poorly as they competed for lucrative jobs with their male counterparts.  Over the years, these women pioneers became part of the faculty, department chairs, and finally the Dean.  The population of women in the School has grown to where they are now 61% of the undergraduate population and 42% of the graduate students.

As part of the 100 days to 100 years: Branner Earth Sciences Library Celebration, we celebrate these pioneering women who were trailblazers, who literally and figuratively broke new ground in the field.  You may see items related to each of these women on display in the Branner Library exhibit case on the 2nd floor of the Mitchell Earth Sciences Building.

  • Lou Henry Hoover (B.A. Geology, 1898): the first woman to major in geology at Stanford.
  • Mary Balch Kennedy (B.A. Geology, 1929): an early student in the geology program.
  • Dr. A. Myra Keen (B.A., Ph.D. Psychology, 1934): the first woman faculty member and a professor of paleontology.
  • Dr. Gail Mahood (A.B., M.A., Ph.D. Geology, 1980): the first woman to be named department chair in the School.
  • Dr. Elizabeth Miller (B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Geology and Geophysics, 1977): the first woman run the Stanford Geological Survey.
  • Dr. Pamela Matson (B.S., M.S., Ph.D. Forest Ecology, 1983): the first woman to be named Dean of the School.

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