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Cover image of Sosu's call

"World Literature Today , the award-winning magazine of international literature and culture, today announced Meshack Asare as the winner of the prestigious 2015 NSK Neustadt Prize for Children’s Literature. Awarded in alternating years with the renowned Neustadt International Prize for Literature, the biennial NSK Prize recognizes great accomplishments in the world of children’s storytelling." (reported October 24, 2014)

Asare's books include Sosu's call, The brassmanʼs secret and Chipo and the bird on the hill : a tale of ancient Zimbabwe.  For other books of interest see Cubberley Library's list of Children's books with an African theme.

Image for International Historical Statistics

Faculty, students, and staff now have online access to the three volume set titled: International Historical Statistics

Flag of the United Nations

October 24 is United Nations Day.

Visit the exhibit: Faces of the World's Refugees on display at the Green Library Lobby

CCRMA Logo

To correspond with the Triple CCRMALite concert and symposium this weekend (Oct 26-27, 2014), the Archive of Recorded Sound and Stanford Media Preservation Lab recently worked to digitized and make available a number of historic performances from Stanford's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics. These recordings, from the CCRMA Tape Archive (ARS.0037), are now available to stream via the Triple CCRMALite website.    


Peg box of a baryton, Brussels (undated)Divertimento 24o per il pariton [original manuscript, 1766]

Stanford University Libraries, Memorial Library of Music, MLM 491

Link to downloadable images of this work

The baryton [pariton] is a bass instrument in the viol family that may be simultaneously bowed and plucked. It features a double set of strings, the upper set gut, for bowing, the lower set metal, for sympathetic vibration and for plucked accompaniment. The metal strings run the length of the neck behind the fingerboard, which is hollowed in the back to allow the left hand to pluck the strings.

Loosely related to the lyra-viol, the baryton likely originated in seventeenth-century England. Its moment in the sun, however, came in ighteenth-century Austria, at the court of the barytonist Prince Nicholas Esterházy, with music supplied in abundance by his ambitious young Kappelmeister, Joseph Haydn.

Cover image of Encyclopedia of educaional theory and philosophy

This week's new books included two works by Graduate School of Education faculty members.  Emeritus professor Denis C. Phillips has edited the Encyclopedia of educational theory and philosophy which covers a wide range of theories and ideas that have shaped education, while professor Linda Darling-Hammond is the co-author of Beyond the bubble test: how performance assessments support 21st century learning.

We invite you to join Stanford's "Another Look" book club (of which the Stanford Libraries are a proud sponsor) in a few weeks to discuss Italo Calvino's mind-expanding collection of science-inspired fantasies, Cosmicomics.

The discussion—free and open to the public—begins at 7:30 p.m. on Monday, October 27, 2014, in the Stanford Humanities Center. Acclaimed author Robert Pogue Harrison, the Rosina Pierotti Professor of Italian Literature, will moderate the panel, with award-winning novelist Tobias Wolff, the Ward W. and Priscilla B. Woods Professor, and literary journalist and visiting scholar Cynthia Haven, who blogs at The Book Haven

The "Another Look" club has a richly-outfitted website at anotherlook.stanford.edu.  Here's a summary of recent posts related to Cosmicomics:

Title page of the Bonaparte Edition (detail)

Collection complette des quatuorsd'Haydn ; dédiée au Premier Consul Bonaparte
A Paris : Chez Pleyel, auteur et editeur de musique, [1802]

Stanford University Libraries, Memorial Library of Music, MLM 496

Link to downloadable images of this work:
violin I | violin II | viola | basso

Goethe described the classical string quartet form as “four rational people conversing,” a type of discourse embodied in the quartets of Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, and Schubert. Haydn, perhaps more than any of his contemporaries, shaped the string quartet into the form we know today, moving away from the typical divertimenti solo with accompaniment, to four equal voices working out thematic material in (often lively) conversation. The complete set of parts featured here is a variant of the first edition of Haydn’s complete string quartets, dedicated to Napoleon Bonaparte, and known as the “Bonaparte Edition,” published by Maison Pleyel in Paris in 1803. 

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