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[Originally posted on Free Government Information blog] Here's an interesting article, not on link rot (a topic FGI has been tracking for some time), but on *data rot*. In a recent article in Current Biology, researchers examined the availability of data from 516 studies between 2 and 22 years old. They found the following:

  • that the odds of a data set being reported as extant fell by 17% per year;
  • Broken e-mails and obsolete storage devices were the main obstacles to data sharing
  • Policies mandating data archiving at publication are clearly needed

Graduate students work on a presentation

 

We are pleased to announce the March 2014 digital issue of the Terman Engineering Library News.   In the news this month:

 



* Cindas Refreshes Website
* Knovel’s Newest Productivity Tool: Interactive Equations
* More Videos, Calculators Added to AccessEngineering
* SciELO Citation Index Available at Web of Science
* Web of Science Meets Google Scholar
* New 2014 Titles in Water Intelligence Online

Download and read the full issue in digital format here:
Terman Engineering Library News

Donald Pippin, Artistic Director of Pocket Opera

Since 1952 Donald Pippin has been a part of the musical life of San Francisco. He is best known as the founder of Pocket Opera, which started in 1977 with the purpose of making opera more accessible to the average concert goer by presenting opera in unique English language translations with a small chamber ensemble. The Donald Pippin Collection consists primarily of Pippin's English translations of opera librettos available as pdf files. Follow the links in the finding aid to download the files.

A new exhibition has just opened at the Stanford Music Library entitled Treasures from the Archive of Recorded Sound, on show through August 14. The exhibition was curated and installed by the Archive of Recorded Sound's Interim Operations Manager, Benjamin Bates, who describes the content and theme of the exhibit in more detail. 

2013 marked the 200th birthdays of Giuseppe Verdi and Richard Wagner. The Music Library purchased a number of out-of-print and rare scores of works by both composers, and books by and about Wagner. The Wagner works include his Die Kunst und die Revolution (Leipzig, 1849) and Deutscher Kunst und deutsche Politik (Leipzig, 1868), Julius Lang’s Zur Versöhnung des Judenthums mit Richard Wagner (Berlin, 1869), and Hermann Schneider’s Richard Wagner und das germanische Altertum (Tübingen, 1939). Arrangements for piano, 2-hands including overtures to Christoph Columbus (Leipzig, 1908), Faust (Leipzig, 189?), and König Enzio (Leipzig & London, 1908), and a score of Lohengrin in French (Paris 1891) were also acquired. All of the Wagner materials are described in Significant Acquisitions 2012-2013, on the Music Library’s web page.

Movie camera

Digital media is a hot topic on campus these days.  With the available tools and technology, it has never been easier to express ideas and broadly communicate information through media formats, and many departments at Stanford are actively producing and posting media online. The emergence of MOOCs and other forms of online learning that incorporate video and audio are heightening awareness of the many challenges in managing all this media content.

To address these challenges, Stanford Libraries and IT Services have teamed up to form a new Community of Practice, the Stanford Media Group. The group offers a unique opportunity for folks across Stanford with a stake in media to share information, foster best practices, identify common needs, and implement centralized solutions to support the work of the University. 

Safari Books logo

The Engineering Library is currently running a trial of Safari's online video collection. Safari Books Online has over 2,100 videos featuring technology, digital media and professional development topics. This collection also includes video from the O'Reilly Media tech converences. Please note that videos are subject to the same seat limit as books. Trial access runs through April 15.

Please send your feedback and comments on this resource to Sarah Lester.

We've set up trial access for a new database called VoxGov (http://voxgov.com). Please take a moment to put the database through its paces and send any feedback you have to me at jrjacobs AT stanford DOT edu by April 8, 2014.

VoxGov has a powerful search and pulls together a large swath of US federal public domain government information with social media data and displays it in a visually understandable way. VoxGov also allows for bulk data access to faculty and graduate students who may need to do deeper data analysis. Bulk data access is via separate individual license and has some restrictions on use and reproduction.

Voxgov collects, organizes and archives primary sourced U.S. Federal Government information from government sites like fdsys.gov, federalregister.gov, congress.gov, and some executive agencies as well as major NGO sites like openCRS and FAS Project on Government Secrecy and combines that public domain information with 4,000 official federal government social media accounts from twitter and facebook, as well as speeches, press releases and content from over 10,000 Federal government web locations.

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