Stanford Libraries Blog

The Carter Family, 1927

Introducing the Bear Family Records collection

December 6, 2016
by Benjamin Lee Stone

Founded by Richard Weize in 1975, the German re-issue label Bear Family Records has been a leader in reissuing lavishly produced box sets of American roots music, with a particular focus on American country music (and related genres) from the 1920s through the 1980s.   Bear Family’s box sets are impeccably curated, with recordings sourced from the best known copies, or master tapes whenever possible.  The reissued recordings are accompanied by extensively researched discographies and book-length liner notes. Bear Family recordings have been the recipient of a number of prestigious awards, including 17 ARSC (Association for Record Sound Collections) Awards for Excellence in Historical Recorded Sound Research and 6 Grammy nominations.

medici.tv

Medici.tv has a brand new look

December 2, 2016
by Ray Heigemeir

Medici.tv just unveiled a sleek new interface for institutional subscribers. If you haven’t yet tried this classical music streaming video database, I encourage you to check it out now.

The medici.tv database includes

  • 3,000 musical works captured from the 1940’s to the present day
  • 1,700 films including concerts, ballets, operas, documentaries, and master classes
  • Over 100 live events broadcast every year from the most prestigious concert halls and classical music festivals, including exclusive live-streamed events
Moody black and white photo of Weldon Kees sitting in chair

Disappeared poet Weldon Kees surfaces in San Francisco Traditional Jazz Foundation collection

November 30, 2016
by Erin L. Hurley

Weldon Kees was unknown to me when I started processing the San Francisco Traditional Jazz Foundation collection about three months ago.  In photographs, Kees has dark hair combed neatly to one side, a matching moustache, and an intense gaze.  He was most often photographed wearing a tweed suit with a sweater vest and tie and holding a cigarette. He dabbled in a number of things (among them: Communism, novel-writing, Abstract Expressionist painting, psychotherapy) but, over time, it has become clear that Kees best made a name for himself through poetry.

Mario Paci

Music exhibit about Mario Paci in Shanghai

November 14, 2016
by Jerry L McBride

On October 14, the exhibit, “Mario Paci and Music Culture in Shanghai: A Special Exhibition in Commemoration of Mario Paci,” opened at Shanghai Symphony Hall to commemorate 70 years since the death of the Symphony’s revered founding conductor. The exhibit is a collaborative project between the Stanford University Libraries, the Shanghai Conservatory of Music, and the Shanghai Symphony Orchestra.

GIS Day @Stanford

GIS Day @Stanford is coming, November 16th!

November 10, 2016
by Mr. Stace D Maples

GIS Day is an annual celebration of geospatial technologies, held on the Wednesday of Geography week. The Stanford Geospatial Center uses GIS Day as an opportunity to connect Stanford researchers to the cutting edge of geospatial technologies, services and applications through talks, workshops and other activities. This year, we'll have analysts, developers and scientists from DigitalGlobe, Mapbox, CARTO, NASA, The National Geospatial Intelligence Agency and more, talking about their work to leverage geospatial data and technologies using machine learning, drones, satellite imagery, and historical data! 

Canzonetta (detail)

Introducing Alfredo Piatti

November 4, 2016
by Ray Heigemeir

Canzonetta for cello and piano [1882]
by Alfredo Piatti (1822-1901)

[download images of this work]

Carlo Alfredo Piatti (1822-1901) was one of the most famous cellists of the 19th century.  Born in Bergamo, Italy, he began his cello studies at age 5 with his uncle. At age 7 he played in the local opera orchestra. In his teens, he studied at the Milan Conservatory and then began touring Europe. After meeting Liszt in Munich, the pianist invited Piatti to share a concert billing in Paris. There, Liszt presented Piatti with a fine Amati cello, having learned that he was playing on borrowed instruments after having to sell his cello during hard times on the road. Piatti later owned a fine Stradivarius cello, now nicknamed the “Piatti.” The book, The Adventures of a Cello, chronicles this instrument's story from its creation in Cremona in 1720 to the present day.

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