Stanford Libraries Blog

No NYT academic passes this summer

June 12, 2013

The New York Times program offering 24 hour daily online passes is not available this summer.

This program will resume in the fall.

The best online source for the current issues (latest two weeks) is Factiva - a database which also has the latest issues of Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, The Times (London), and more. The New York Times: archive offers articles from 1851-2009 from ProQuest.

Green Library study break with doggies: Sunday, June 9

June 4, 2013
by Christopher Matson

Green Library will be hosting a study break for students on Sunday, June 9, from 6:00 to 7:30 pm featuring two awesome dogs, Oliver and CeeCee. Come enjoy some healthy snacks and play with the dogs! We'll be outside the main entrance of Green facing the red fountain.

Book sale today!

June 4, 2013

Stanford University Press will hold an overstock book sale, today, Tuesday, June 4 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. There will be lots of books to browse and buy. Paperbacks will sell for $5; cloth bound for $10. The sale takes place at Koret Park, between Green and Meyer libraries.

New York Times, June 1913

Pagan ritual, Parisian riots, and extra-terrestrial gold

May 31, 2013
by Ray Heigemeir

May 29, 2013 marks the centennial of one of the most storied premieres in modern history; namely, that of the ballet, Le Sacre du Printemps (The Rite of Spring) at the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées in Paris. The music was composed by Igor Stravinsky, with choreography by Vaslav Nijinsky, performed by Serge Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes; the orchestra was conducted by Pierre Monteux.

Celebrating 100 years of "The Rite"

May 29, 2013

Today marks 100 years to the day since the infamous first performance of Igor Stravinsky's Le Sacre du Printemps (The Rite of Spring) at the Théâtre des Champs‐Elysées in Paris on 29 May 1913. The 31-year-old composer's two-part ballet score, coupled with 24-year-old Vaclav Nijinsky's choreography, provoked a riot on the opening night that according to most accounts rendered the music inaudible for most of the performance. The protests were so loud that Ballet Russes Director, Serge Diaghilev, was supposedly forced to shout instructions to his dancers onstage while flashing the auditorium's house lights in an attempt to quell the enraged audience. 

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