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Logo from the 2015 Stanford MECON


We are pleased to announce the April 2015 digital issue of the Terman Engineering Library News.


In the news this month:

  • Stanford Engineering Heroes Celebrated
  • Knovel Tablet App in Beta
  • Data Day Slides and Video Now Online
  • Wiley Online and Chrome Browser
  • MECON Abstracts Online Now
  • Latest Research Highlights in Haze Studies

Read the full newsletter online.

Silicon Valley gives logo

Chances are high that if you live in the Bay Area, you have seen #SVGives2015 trending online.  Last year, over $8 million was raised in 24 hours to support Silicon Valley causes. The goal of Silicon Valley Gives is to inspire philanthropy--at any level--and create a community of giving for Bay Area causes.

Are you a Stanford student, alumnus, or faculty member who has relied upon services and materials from our library? Or are you a parent whose child seeks solitude and inspiration within our walls or across our online information network? Perhaps you are neither, but you’ve benefited from access to our collection or tapped into any of the open access projects we have contributed to, or you simply believe research libraries play a vital role in discovery, then join in on the day of giving to support Stanford Libraries by making a gift today.

Cover image of Lion & mouse

Green Library’s display of Beasts and Books inspired Cubberley staff to pull some of our books featuring animals and create our own display.  We confess we may have gone a little crazy, but children’s books featuring animals have long been in vogue. Animals have been recognized as being a way to engage children since the publication of Description of Three Hundred Animals by Thomas Boreman in 1730. Early examples of animal stories include Aesop’s Fables. A particularly fine award winning version of Aesop’s The Lion & the mouse has been done by Jerry Pinkney.    Other stories are so timeless and so beloved it is surprising to learn how long ago they were published, for example, The Tale of Peter Rabbit was published in 1902.

Please come by and take a peek at Beatix Potter, Jerry Pinkney as well as many other wonderful books. Also, as a bit of fun in the spirit of all those Buzzfeed quizzes, we’ve also got a quiz you can take to test your knowledge of all things furry in children’s books.

Before the Loma Prieta earthquake in 1989, the map collection at Branner Library consisted mostly of geologic and topographic maps.  Stanford's "Central Map Collection," which had resided in the badly-damaged west wing of Green Library, was subsequently transferred to Branner.

Among the many thematic maps acquired after that time were a number of fanciful "pictorial maps," some of the most interesting being from the 1930's.

For example, there is a 1937 Dole Pineapple map of the Hawaiian Islands, with pictures of boats, fish, cattle, surfers, wildlife, palm trees and airplanes.  The top margin displays distinctive Hawaiian flowers, and the bottom margin shows fish.  The Hawaiian Pineapple Co., Ltd., prepared and distributed this map, presumably to attract visitors.

The Dole Map of the Hawaiian Islands, U.S.A.  Found at

One hundred years ago today on April 28, 1915, the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) was formed when 1200 women from neutral and warring nations met in the Hague, Netherlands with the aim of negotiating the end of World War I, and to urge peaceful resolution and ‘continuous mediation’ to avoid future conflicts.
In conjunction with this centenary anniversary, the Archive of Recorded Sound (ARS) is very pleased to announce the release of 256 recordings of oral history interviews conducted with over 90 veteran members of WILPF from local California and other states’ branches in the USA. These recordings, part of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Collection, are now freely accessible to the world via Searchworks. Also featured are recordings from the 1967 WILPF National Conference at Asilomar, in Pacific Grove, CA. 
Cover image of Beyond Magenta

Stanford University Libraries have resources that look at the subject of transgender youth including the new book Beyond Magenta pictured here.  For related works see Cubberley Library's guides:

In response to Friday’s powerful 7.8-magnitude earthquake in Nepal, Stanford volunteer “crisis mappers” are working with Humanitarian OpenStreetMap to assist in disaster relief by mapping Nepal’s road networks, buildings, and residential areas.

Anyone with a laptop and spare time can help responders on the ground. The Stanford Geospatial Center housed in the Branner Earth Sciences Library will be hosting ongoing Introductory Relief Mapping sessions all week to help train people to use OpenStreetMap, an open source and open data sharing tool adding information to relief effort maps. Drop-in volunteers are encouraged to join all day from 9am-9pm, Monday-Friday.

The first Introductory Relief Mapping session will be held Monday, April 17 from 6-7pm at the Branner Earth Sciences Library Teaching Corner, on the 2nd floor of the Mitchell Earth Science Building.

Mappa [sic] geologico do Brazil, Geological Society of America, 1991 Branner, John Casper, Contributor.

The Branner Earth Sciences Library is named after John Casper Branner (1850-1922). Branner was, among many things, a geologist, an academic and a founding member of the faculty at Stanford and went on to become Stanford’s second president. He was also president of the Geological Society of America and served as the president of the Seismological Society of America.


Mappa [sic] geologico do Brazil, Geological Society of America, 1919. Branner, John Casper, Contributor.