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A manuscript fair copy of the text an otherwise unrecorded work, Agamemnon, opéra des dames, Poëme heroique, don’t les paroles et la musique ont fait l’amusement d’un Particulier Vieux Stil, was recently acquired. It is believed to have originated in the second half of the eighteenth century and was apparently performed in Paris, “La Feste est au bord de la Seine près des Thuilleries” to mark the end of recent hostilities. The manuscript which also contains the text to three cantatas, L’innocence, L’amour vainquer, and Les regrets, originally scored for musette, vielle, flute, and bassoon, will be kept in the Department of Special Collections, Green Library.

Haydn Lieder (1781) title page detail

XII Lieder fur as Clavier, erster Teil (1781), HXXVIa:1-12
Wienn : Heraus gegeben und zu haben bey Artaria Comp., [approximately 1781]

Stanford University Libraries, Memorial Library of Music, MLM 499

Link to downloadable images of this work 

The Lieder were among the first works requested for publication by Haydn’s Austrian publisher, Artaria & Co., with whom he began a relationship at the end of the 1770s.  Artaria announced publication of this first set of Lieder in December 1781 (the second set followed in 1784), possibly to coincide with the festivities surrounding the Grand Tour of Russian Grand Duke Paul (later Tzar Paul II) and his entourage, including the Count and Countess von Norden. Other works published around this time were the highly praised op. 33 quartets. Both the Lieder and the op. 33 quartets represent a break from Haydn's more studious earlier works; the tribute to laziness that is "Lob der Faulheit" (in the second set of Lieder) in particular, has been singled out for its wit and overall affect.

Oalla iPad App

Do you have an older iPad that is just sitting around idle? Why not use it for something productive such as interactive front desk signage?

The Stanford Engineering Library continues to partner with Oalla, a student-run interactive digital signage project, in the planning and development of signage apps that are relevant to libraries.   A new Oalla app has been designed specifically for use with iPads that allows instant patron feedback.  We are using the app to gain feedback on what services and equipment are important to our library users.  Other uses may include displaying events, advertising products or services, or way finding.  Oalla is free, easy to use and can put your previous generation iPads to good use.  An iPad stand such as the Ipevo Perch can be used to prevent your iPad from walking away.

Send an email to signup@oalla.com for a free account and set-up instructions.  Contact Michael Nack (mnack@stanford.edu) if you have further questions.

Cover image of Sosu's call

"World Literature Today , the award-winning magazine of international literature and culture, today announced Meshack Asare as the winner of the prestigious 2015 NSK Neustadt Prize for Children’s Literature. Awarded in alternating years with the renowned Neustadt International Prize for Literature, the biennial NSK Prize recognizes great accomplishments in the world of children’s storytelling." (reported October 24, 2014)

Asare's books include Sosu's call, The brassmanʼs secret and Chipo and the bird on the hill : a tale of ancient Zimbabwe.  For other books of interest see Cubberley Library's list of Children's books with an African theme.

Image for International Historical Statistics

Faculty, students, and staff now have online access to the three volume set titled: International Historical Statistics

Flag of the United Nations

October 24 is United Nations Day.

Visit the exhibit: Faces of the World's Refugees on display at the Green Library Lobby

CCRMA Logo

To correspond with the Triple CCRMALite concert and symposium this weekend (Oct 26-27, 2014), the Archive of Recorded Sound and Stanford Media Preservation Lab recently worked to digitized and make available a number of historic performances from Stanford's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics. These recordings, from the CCRMA Tape Archive (ARS.0037), are now available to stream via the Triple CCRMALite website.    


Peg box of a baryton, Brussels (undated)Divertimento 24o per il pariton [original manuscript, 1766]

Stanford University Libraries, Memorial Library of Music, MLM 491

Link to downloadable images of this work

The baryton [pariton] is a bass instrument in the viol family that may be simultaneously bowed and plucked. It features a double set of strings, the upper set gut, for bowing, the lower set metal, for sympathetic vibration and for plucked accompaniment. The metal strings run the length of the neck behind the fingerboard, which is hollowed in the back to allow the left hand to pluck the strings.

Loosely related to the lyra-viol, the baryton likely originated in seventeenth-century England. Its moment in the sun, however, came in ighteenth-century Austria, at the court of the barytonist Prince Nicholas Esterházy, with music supplied in abundance by his ambitious young Kappelmeister, Joseph Haydn.

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