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GIS Day @Stanford

GIS Day is an annual celebration of geospatial technologies, held on the Wednesday of Geography week. The Stanford Geospatial Center uses GIS Day as an opportunity to connect Stanford researchers to the cutting edge of geospatial technologies, services and applications through talks, workshops and other activities. This year, we'll have analysts, developers and scientists from DigitalGlobe, Mapbox, CARTO, NASA, The National Geospatial Intelligence Agency and more, talking about their work to leverage geospatial data and technologies using machine learning, drones, satellite imagery, and historical data! 

The ArcLight project team would like to provide a brief update regarding our progress on the design process and and timeline for further work. ArcLight is intended be a Blacklight-based environment that supports discovery and digital delivery of information in archives. The project team is using a community-oriented, collaborative design process for ArcLight to engage more institutions earlier in the process. 

Microscopy image by Juan G. Cueva and Miriam B. Goodman

For nearly four years, the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR) has been home to the research outputs of scientists and scholars from across Stanford’s campus. But while those data files, videos, source code, microscopy images, survey results, maps and more have been discoverable and accessible through the Libraries’ online catalog, SearchWorks, it has been hard to get an overview of all the available data. Until now.

Mark Matienzo

We are pleased to announce that Mark Matienzo is joining  Stanford Libraries as of September 19, 2016 as our Collaboration & Interoperability Architect. Mark will be joining Stanford from DPLA (the Digital Public Library of America) where he currently serves as the Director of Technology. He has previously worked  as an archivist, a digital library software developer, and the technical architect for the ArchivesSpace project, at institutions including DPLA, the Yale University Library, and The New York Public Library.

Logo of the International Image Interoperability Framework

The Stanford University Libraries (SUL) has introduced new features in its online catalog, SearchWorks, and the Stanford Digital Repository to make it easier for users worldwide to get access to a treasure trove of high resolution digital images.  The basis of these new features is the International Image Interoperability Framework, a global initiative co-founded by SUL to support the creation of a global network of broadly accessible images curated and produced by libraries, museums, archives and galleries to support research, teaching and broad public use.  

Spotlights in the Centre Ceramique, Maastricht

On August 9-10, the Yale University Libraries and Yale Center for British Art hosted an event to showcase the open source software platform called Spotlight (http://spotlight.projectblacklight.org).  

In honor of the useR! 2016 Conference taking place this week, we wanted to outline ways researchers can use the Stanford Digital Repository to power their R visualizations.

The Stanford Digital Repository allow Stanford researchers and affiliates to deposit research data for preservation, access, and discovery. Data deposited in the repository is citable and from which the original content can be downloaded. The data is then made available through open web standard services for consumption. For example, images in the repository are delivered by a IIIF-compatible service, geospatial data are served out as Web Mapping Services (WMS) and Web Feature Services (WFS), and generic files are all served through HTTP.

R users can take advantage of these web services and the data being served out.

The David Rumsey Map Collection Chrome Browser plug-in

About this series

As part of the opening events for The David Rumsey Map Center at Stanford's Green Library I recently gave a talk about the various ways you can "hack" the David Rumsey Map Collection. I showed how you can make use of the David Rumsey Map Collection using a variety of Stanford University Library resources and services.

Over the next few weeks I will post a series of brief step-by-step "how-to" tutorials on making use of digital resources from the David Rumsey Map Center and Collection. For the most part, I will be highlighting the resources I presented in my talk.

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