You are here

Digital library



unmediated, sheet
1 map : color ; 345 x 504 cm
Japan, 1837
Place of publication not given : : Publisher not given,, 1837
Scale 1:21,600.
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 Unported License

By Deardra Fuzzell and Wayne Vanderkuil
A historic manuscript map and a gem of the Stanford Library Map Collection, the Ōmi Kuni-ezu 近江國絵圖 Japanese Tax Map from 1837 is hand drawn and painted in the round. This map is designed to be displayed on the floor with the viewer standing in its center. From this central vantage point, the map may be read with ease from any direction. As this display and viewing method is no longer possible for a map fast approaching its 200th birthday, Stanford has recently digitized this item to enable access for research, teaching and learning as well as preservation of the original object.

This the largest and most difficult oversized map Stanford has digitized thus far.
See how the Map Program went about imaging this unique item.

Screenshot of embed code from SUL's latest embed viewer

The Stanford Digital Repository (SDR) PURL pages have a new look and loads of new, compelling functionality. If you deposit content to the SDR, or if you write about content in the SDR, or if you help users of SUL's digital collections, then you will definitely want to read on!

It’s been more than a year since we announced the completion of the first phase of development of Spotlight, an innovative solution that enables libraries and other cultural heritage institutions to build high-quality online exhibits from content in their digital collections. Spotlight was built to make it easier for library curators, as well as faculty or students to create customized, feature-rich and searchable websites from the vast digital collections held by the Stanford University Libraries.  The initial phase of development culminated in the first production exhibit built with Spotlight, Maps of Africa: An Online Exhibit. This online collection site was built primarily by SUL's Digital and Rare Maps Librarian, G. Salim Mohammed, with only minimal help from lbrary technical staff.

World Railroads, 1:10 million (2012), Natural Earth

You can now find and access Natural Earth geospatial data directly from EarthWorks.

Three new digital collections were added to SearchWorks during the month of July. This brings the total number of digital collections available in SearchWorks to 93. The collections recently added are:

Title: A tide prediction and tide height control system for laboratory mesocosms

Abstract: Software code to accompany the manuscript "A tide prediction and tide height control system for laboratory aquaria" by L.P. Miller and J. D. Long

Collection contact: Amy Hodge

Two new digital collections were added to SearchWorks during the month of June. This brings the total number of digital collections available in SearchWorks to 90. The collections recently added are:

A novel computational method of metabolic network analysis for genetic discovery

Abstract: Java scripts for re-production of the computational method being published in Pharmacogenetics and Genomics 2012, 22:877–886

Collection contact: Amy Hodge

Undergraduate Theses, Department of Biology, 2014-2015 

Abstract: Honors theses written by undergraduates in the Stanford University Department of Biology, 2014-2015.

Collection contact: Michael Newman

The integration of digital collections into SearchWorks means that items from collections containing digital material can be discovered in the course of searching and browsing through the totality of Stanford's vast library catalog.

For more information on depositing materials into the Stanford Digital Repository, visit our website. For questions or additional information about the Stanford Digital Repository service, please email us at

This project is a spin-off from the ongoing GAMECIP (Game Metadata and Citation Project) funded by the Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS).  We are planning to spin off and expand our work on controlled platform vocabularies with additional research and photography, then publish a definitive terminology and ontology for computer game platforms in a manner that will be useful for libraries, museums, collectors and scholars. We are beginning with the most used set as an initial set.

The two core components of the project are (1) review and photography of hardware in Stanford’s Stephen M. Cabrinety Collection in the History of Microcomputing, in order to complete our assessment and provide visual aids in the published terminology guide; and (2) collation, editing and design of platform and media description sheets that will be made available online and, eventually, be available for publication in a print format.  

Shu-Wen Lin

The Stanford Media Preservation Lab and the Department of Special Collections are delighted that Shu-Wen Lin is spending the summer with us in Redwood City interning as a media archivist. Leveraging her interest and background in the arts, Shu-Wen will help to process and preserve several media-based collections, including the archives of visual artist Carolee Schneeman and the archives of Telling Pictures, a prominent Bay Area film production company. Shu-Wen's first day is June 1.