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SLAC Early website "We had no idea that we were making history and were just trying to get the job done in our 'spare' time',”  Louise Addis, one of the WWWizards team who developed the SLAC website from 1991, said during our conversation about the restoration of SLAC's earliest website. Last May, Nicholas Taylor, web archiving service manager, told me, "SLAC has a historical collection of webpages that may be the first website in the US. Can we help them to find a home for this archive?” As Web archivist, I felt that I found a treasure. I replied, "Of course, Stanford Web Archive Portal should be the home."

One of the major use cases for the Web Archiving Service is preserving Stanford University web content. The earliest SLAC website represent the oldest such content we could find; it is the first website in the US dated to 1991, so we started there. Stanford Web Archiving Service launched its portal this week which featured SLAC's earliest website that was kept on SLAC servers for many years. This Halloween, it comes back to life. Our task was to convert the original list of scattered files into an accessible, browsable website with temporal navigation. In this post, I will discuss the technical challenges of and lessons learned from restoration process.

Six new digital collections are now available in SearchWorks. These new collections were all created using SDR Online Deposit and take advantage of SearchWorks' ability to provide users with rich discovery and access capabilities for finding and working with digital collection content.

Undergraduate Honors Theses, Department of English

Collection consists of 4 undergraduate honors theses from the Department of English, 2014.

Collection Contact: Kenneth Ligda, English ATS

Five new digital collections are now available in SearchWorks. These new collections take advantage of SearchWorks' ability to provide users with rich discovery and access capabilities for finding and working with digital collection content.

Marge Frantz lectures on McCarthyism, 2003 

The materials consist of videorecordings of lectures on McCarthyism by Marge Frantz. Lectures were part of an anthropology class taught by Dr. S. Lochlann Jain.

Collection Contact: Daniel Hartwig

Professor John Willinsky

John Willinsky waited for a couple of weeks after the fall quarter had started to give the Graduate School of Education (GSE) faculty and students some time to settle in to their routines before sending out the big news:

While reading Sybil Schaefer's interview "We're All Digital Archivists Now," I was happy to see the following comment "we don’t all need to be digital archivists, but we do need to be archivists who work with digital materials. It’s not scalable to have one person, or one team, focus on the 'digital stuff.'"  

I heartily agree with her statement. Since our involvement in the AIMS project, we have required that project archivists process both the analog and digital portions of a collection. And yet, it is apparent that there is a very important role for a digital archivist. Someone who will keep up with new tools and automated processing methods, be on hand to train these project archivists, support acquisition (curators, subject specialists, donors) and explore and assist with our efforts across a wide spectrum of new projects.

If you are interested in some of the details regarding the activities and functions of SUL's digital archivist, please read Peter Chan's recent article - "What Does it Take to Be a Well-rounded Digital Archivist?

 

A new and exciting addition to the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR) is the data behind the City Nature project. This innovative project combines methodologies from the digital humanities and spatial analysis fields to explore urban nature. Project PIs are Jon Christensen and Michael Kahan with development work by both Karl Grossner and Elijah Meeks.

The Stanford University Libaries is one of the founding partners of the International Image Interoperability Framework (http://iiif.io), which aims to enable broad access to cultural heritage images on the web. This exciting initiative is in its fifth year and is beginning to have an impact on the way digital images are used to support research and teaching.  The IIIF editors recently released version 2.0 the IIIF API's, which is a major step towards creating a stable and sustainable technology framework for image interoperability.   

To celebrate this progress, the IIIF community is hosting a one day information sharing event at the British Library about the use of images in and across cultural heritage institutions.  The day will focus on how museums, galleries, libraries and archives, or any online image service, can take advantage of a powerful technical framework for interoperability between image repositories.   This event will be valuable for organizational decision makers, repository and collection managers, software engineers, and anyone interested in exploring the wide range of use cases that are seamlessly enabled by the framework.  

Attendance is free, and widespread dissemination of the event is encouraged.

A detailed program is available at http://iiif.io/event/2014/london.html and those interested can register to attend at http://bit.ly/iiiflondon2014.

 

Dr. Rob Sanderson

In a move that will have a profound and long-lasting impact on the library sector, the W3C officially chartered a new working group on Web Annotation on August 20, 2014. Stanford Libraries staff member, Rob Sanderson, will serve as the working group's inaugural co-chair. 

The W3C is the standards body that guides the development of the Web, and has had a longstanding Open Annotation Community Group focused on how to annotate digital resources on the Web. As a newly chartered working group, the output of these discussions can now be channeled into official W3C recommendations, and baked into fabric of the Web itself.  

As library content and services become increasingly digital, the ability to annotate it--provide commentary, analysis, reviews, transcription, description, links and more--is increasingly a concern. By helping define a standard approach to annotation (in the broadest sense) of web resources, libraries can help fulfill their traditional mission of supporting research, scholarly communication and the diffusion of knowledge in the 21st century. And by working deeply in standards efforts like those of the W3C, libraries can help ensure their technologies and services are integral to and leverage the latest information technologies, instead of competing with them or lagging behind. 

Dr. Sanderson, who joined Stanford Libraries in April of 2014, brings extensive experience in annotations to the W3C and Stanford. He was one of the principal investigators of the Open Annotation Collaboration, a precursor to the W3C community group, where he also served as co-chair and a driving force. In recognition of his ongoing contributions and position within the community, Dr. Sanderson is serving as one of the co-chairs of the Working Group, which is a boon for the W3C, for Stanford, and for the future of annotation on the Web. 

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