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Tōshōsha Engi scrolls

These delicately nuanced early reproductions were made using a collotype printing method, which uses light-sensitive gelatin colloid coated plates and photographic negatives to create fine detail. They were presented to Stanford University as a gift from David Starr Jordan, which is noted on a small commemorative plaque tucked in the box. "Before the Meiji Restoration of 1868, the pictures were inspected by the successive Shoguns on the occasion of their periodical visits to the Temples at Nikko, but no other persons were as a matter of fact permitted to view them." The pictures are now considered national treasures. See the fully digitized items online.

Geo4LibCamp is a hands-on meeting to bring together those building repository and associated services for geospatial data to share best practices, solve common problems, and address technical issues. We met at Stanford University for the second Geo4LibCamp unconference from January 30 until February 3, 2017. Nearly 50 attendees from 30 institutions participated in the main three day event, and about 20 attendees for the two day post-conference working sessions. The institutions were primarily academic research libraries -- Alberta, Arizona State, California State, Chicago, Colorado School of Mines, Colorado State, Colorado at Boulder, Connecticut State Library, Cornell, Data Curation Experts, Mapzen, Michigan, Minnesota, Moss Landing Marine Labs, Nebraska at Lincoln, New York U, Northwestern, Notre Dame, Princeton, Purdue, Rice, Stanford, UC Berkeley, UC Davis, UC Riverside, UC Santa Barbara, UC Santa Cruz, UCLA, Wisconsin – Milwaukee, and Yale.

GIS Day @Stanford

GIS Day is an annual celebration of geospatial technologies, held on the Wednesday of Geography week. The Stanford Geospatial Center uses GIS Day as an opportunity to connect Stanford researchers to the cutting edge of geospatial technologies, services and applications through talks, workshops and other activities. This year, we'll have analysts, developers and scientists from DigitalGlobe, Mapbox, CARTO, NASA, The National Geospatial Intelligence Agency and more, talking about their work to leverage geospatial data and technologies using machine learning, drones, satellite imagery, and historical data! 

The ArcLight project team would like to provide a brief update regarding our progress on the design process and and timeline for further work. ArcLight is intended be a Blacklight-based environment that supports discovery and digital delivery of information in archives. The project team is using a community-oriented, collaborative design process for ArcLight to engage more institutions earlier in the process. 

Microscopy image by Juan G. Cueva and Miriam B. Goodman

For nearly four years, the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR) has been home to the research outputs of scientists and scholars from across Stanford’s campus. But while those data files, videos, source code, microscopy images, survey results, maps and more have been discoverable and accessible through the Libraries’ online catalog, SearchWorks, it has been hard to get an overview of all the available data. Until now.

Mark Matienzo

We are pleased to announce that Mark Matienzo is joining  Stanford Libraries as of September 19, 2016 as our Collaboration & Interoperability Architect. Mark will be joining Stanford from DPLA (the Digital Public Library of America) where he currently serves as the Director of Technology. He has previously worked  as an archivist, a digital library software developer, and the technical architect for the ArchivesSpace project, at institutions including DPLA, the Yale University Library, and The New York Public Library.

Logo of the International Image Interoperability Framework

The Stanford University Libraries (SUL) has introduced new features in its online catalog, SearchWorks, and the Stanford Digital Repository to make it easier for users worldwide to get access to a treasure trove of high resolution digital images.  The basis of these new features is the International Image Interoperability Framework, a global initiative co-founded by SUL to support the creation of a global network of broadly accessible images curated and produced by libraries, museums, archives and galleries to support research, teaching and broad public use.  

Spotlights in the Centre Ceramique, Maastricht

On August 9-10, the Yale University Libraries and Yale Center for British Art hosted an event to showcase the open source software platform called Spotlight (http://spotlight.projectblacklight.org).  

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