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Wrecked midget in pits

In February and March, approximately 357,000 new files representing over 14,000 items were accessioned into the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR). These materials include -- but are not limited to -- items from the Watershed Map of India, the People's Computer Company, and Revs Digital Library

PowerPoint slide from SDR online deposit on Anthopleura Sea Anemone Distribution in the Rocky Intertidal at Hopkins Marine Station

Four new digital collections were added to SearchWorks via Stanford Digital Repository (SDR) online deposit during the month of March. These collections take advantage of recently released functionality that provides researchers with new rich discovery and access capabilities for finding and working with digital collection content.

By Deardra Fuzzell and Wayne Vanderkuil
A historic geologic map, the data for which was compiled over the course of many years by one determined man, William Smith. Completed nearly 2 centuries ago, it remains incredibly relevant.

This is one of the largest and most difficult oversized objects Stanford has digitized thus far.
See how the Digital Production Group went about imaging this unique item.

We've set up trial access for a new database called VoxGov (http://voxgov.com). Please take a moment to put the database through its paces and send any feedback you have to me at jrjacobs AT stanford DOT edu by April 8, 2014.

VoxGov has a powerful search and pulls together a large swath of US federal public domain government information with social media data and displays it in a visually understandable way. VoxGov also allows for bulk data access to faculty and graduate students who may need to do deeper data analysis. Bulk data access is via separate individual license and has some restrictions on use and reproduction.

Voxgov collects, organizes and archives primary sourced U.S. Federal Government information from government sites like fdsys.gov, federalregister.gov, congress.gov, and some executive agencies as well as major NGO sites like openCRS and FAS Project on Government Secrecy and combines that public domain information with 4,000 official federal government social media accounts from twitter and facebook, as well as speeches, press releases and content from over 10,000 Federal government web locations.

Ampex VR3000

The San Francisco History Expo is this weekend (March 1-2, 2014) at the Old Mint. Some very early video footage from the Ampex Corp collection at Stanford will be on view there.

This footage -- preserved through the state-wide California Audiovisual Preservation Project -- is special because it demonstrates Ampex's first portable video recorder, the VR-3000. It depicts scenes recorded on a San Francisco cable car going steeply down (probably) California Street in 1967!

Planisfero del mondo vecchio, 1691?

Hemispheres in cartography refer to slicing the globe into spherical halves. Generally, hemispheres we see in maps are Northern or Southern, where the equator is the dividing line and Eastern and Western, or where the prime meridian, East and West of 180˚ longitude, bisects the two. 

A collection of six maps from Glen McLaughlin's Map Collection of California as an Island, give you a peek at a few hemispheric maps published between 1683 and 1807 and show how hemispheres were sliced differently on maps between the 17th and 19th century. Visit Branner Library to view them in person. The exhibit will run from until April 23, 2014.

Album A: Photographs of China's natural landscapes, urban scenes, cultural landmarks, social customs, and people.

Fourteen new digital collections representing content from SUL, Image, Video and Multimedia Systems - Stanford University and Hoover Archives, are now available in SearchWorks. These collections take advantage of recently released SearchWorks functionality that provides researchers with new rich discovery and access capabilities for finding and working with digital collection content. In addition to the 11 collections from Stanford University Archives that Daniel Hartwig blogged about, researchers may now discover:

Spotlights in the Centre Ceramique, Maastricht

by Stu Snydman & Gary Geisler

The Stanford University Libraries (SUL) have a rich and diverse collection of digital content. Users can discover collections and content from the Stanford Digital Repository through the library website, library catalog (SearchWorks), and persistent citation (PURL) pages. SUL also develops robust, custom-built websites for selected  collections (see Parker on the Web and the French Revolution Digital Archive) that provide a rich discovery environment and a range of features that enable users to more effectively work with the collection items. But these sites require significant investment in time and development resources to produce and maintain, limiting the number and variety SUL can support.

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