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We have been providing in-person updates to key library staff groups over the last several weeks. We are sharing with everyone the PowerPoint slides we have been using. The slides include a projected timeline for the project, as well as an overview of what staff who create and maintain content on the library website should be doing throughout the project. As always, we include a list of ways for library staff to remain actively engaged with the project.

The Stanford University Libraries will host an exhibition marking the 40th anniversary of the founding of the Hand Bookbinders of California. The exhibition will open Thursday, July 19, 2012, in the Peterson Gallery and Munger Rotunda, Green Library, Stanford University, and continue through Wednesday, September 5.

Formed in March 1972, the Hand Bookbinders of California was from its inception devoted to promoting and supporting the craft of traditional Western hand bookbinding. The founding group included some of the Bay Area’s most influential collectors, among them Duncan Olmstead and Gale Herrick, and many binders and teachers of binding, such as Stella Patri and Leah Wollenberg. Membership is open to binders of all skill levels anywhere in the world as well as anyone interested in its mission. Members are encouraged to enter their work in the annual, non-juried exhibition.

In addition to contemporary members’ bindings, this year’s exhibition at Stanford includes fine design bindings selected from the Libraries’ Special Collections. Bindings by Paul Bonet and Pierre Lucien Martin represent the strong French influence on the work of Bay Area teachers of binding, many of whom studied in France. Also on display is work by some of the organization’s early members and teachers, including Belle McMurtry Young, Peter Fahey, Florence Walter, Betty Lou Chaika, Donald Glaister, Joanne Sonnichsen, Barbara Fallon Hiller, Anne Kahle, and Eleanore Ramsey.

By now, you've seen the site map and the emerging visual design for the new site; these are like the foundation and the décor of a new house. Between these two layers, there's a lot of design work around creating the rooms, placing the windows, planning the traffic flow, etc. In a website project, that design work is represented in mockups or wireframes that define how the pages will be laid out, what content will be presented, and how the navigation will work.

The 30+ mockups in this PDF cover a representative set of page templates to allow Drupal development and content creation to begin. The designs are based on the user data we collected, and have been validated at several stages by user testing and reviews. We'll continue to validate (and modify) these designs as we build them into a functional site.

As always, your feedback is welcome - via email to online-experience-group@lists.stanford.edu, or the send us feedback form.

We are excited to offer a preview of the emerging visual designs for the new library website. We have included a version of the home page and a sub-page (Ask Us) to give you a sense of the colors, font, layout and overall design aesthetic of the new site.

Keep in mind that these designs are in the early stages of development and -- importantly -- the text and labels in these designs are not by any means final.

We expect the designs to change as the Drupal site gets built and is populated with real library content. And of course we expect that continued user testing and feedback will help us create a clean, usable and, yes, attractive library website.

 

   

A critical step in the development of a large complex website is the definition of the information architecture. The information architecture defines the structure, hierarchy and navigational pathways of a website, and the major categories of content.

Website designers often use personas to insure the design will meet users' needs. "A persona is a character sketch that represents a particular segment of the target audience," according to Steve Mulder, author of The User is Always Right: A Practical Guide to Creating and Using Personas for the Web.

The SULAIR Website Redesign Project has officially kicked off! The project team is excited to be working with web consultants, Chapter Three, on the first big step--developing a detailed workplan for rolling out a new library website by Fall 2011. To help focus the project, we have developed the following high-level goals.

We are pleased to share the news that we have selected Chapter Three as a partner for the Library Website Redesign Project. Chapter Three is a "local" (San Francisco) company with Stanford experience, and a managing partner who is a librarian! They have a deep understanding of what we do.

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