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Planisfero del mondo vecchio, 1691?

Hemispheres in cartography refer to slicing the globe into spherical halves. Generally, hemispheres we see in maps are Northern or Southern, where the equator is the dividing line and Eastern and Western, or where the prime meridian, East and West of 180˚ longitude, bisects the two. 

A collection of six maps from Glen McLaughlin's Map Collection of California as an Island, give you a peek at a few hemispheric maps published between 1683 and 1807 and show how hemispheres were sliced differently on maps between the 17th and 19th century. Visit Branner Library to view them in person. The exhibit will run from until April 23, 2014.

Album A: Photographs of China's natural landscapes, urban scenes, cultural landmarks, social customs, and people.

Fourteen new digital collections representing content from SUL, Image, Video and Multimedia Systems - Stanford University and Hoover Archives, are now available in SearchWorks. These collections take advantage of recently released SearchWorks functionality that provides researchers with new rich discovery and access capabilities for finding and working with digital collection content. In addition to the 11 collections from Stanford University Archives that Daniel Hartwig blogged about, researchers may now discover:

Spotlights in the Centre Ceramique, Maastricht

by Stu Snydman & Gary Geisler

The Stanford University Libraries (SUL) have a rich and diverse collection of digital content. Users can discover collections and content from the Stanford Digital Repository through the library website, library catalog (SearchWorks), and persistent citation (PURL) pages. SUL also develops robust, custom-built websites for selected  collections (see Parker on the Web and the French Revolution Digital Archive) that provide a rich discovery environment and a range of features that enable users to more effectively work with the collection items. But these sites require significant investment in time and development resources to produce and maintain, limiting the number and variety SUL can support.

Satirical print of French aristocrats

We're excited to announce Stanford University Libraries' release of the French Revolution Digital Archive web site (FRDA): frda.stanford.edu

FRDA is the result of a multi-year collaboration of the Stanford University Libraries and the Bibliothèque nationale de France (BnF) to produce a digital version of the key research sources of the French Revolution and make them available to the international scholarly community. 

4chan forum logo

The free-for-all, anything-goes nature of anonymous posting to discussions boards is a defining feature of Internet subculture, and arguably nowhere has this practice been more vigorous or virulent than on 4ChanNow those notorious anonymous posts are available from the SDR

Open tape reel from Gerhard Samuel Collection, ARS.0049

During the fall of 2013, Stanford University Libraries (SUL) convened a working group to investigate the current state of access to audio and moving image materials held within its various collections, notably rare materials within its different special collections departments, along with those held at the Hoover Institution Library and Archives. 

Following many weeks of investigation, the Media Access Working Group (MAWG) produced a report in December 2013 outlining its findings, along with various recommendations to help tackle the issues discovered. The group considered issues relating to use cases, copyright status, available technologies - including media streaming, and content usage. 

Image from Fred Buenzle photograph album available online (M1983; xz190hb3188_00_047)

Fred J. Buenzle papers. circa 1870-1946 (M1983) 

Just after the earlier article announcing the opening of this collection came out, a photograph album in the collection was digitized. It contains eighty fading silver gelatin prints which include images of Naval training in Guantanamo Bay and other images in and around Havana, Cuba.

                            

Stanford University Library's (SUL) collaboration with the California Audiovisual Preservation Project (CAVPP) has yielded two more preserved objects on the Internet Archive: 

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