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Satirical print of French aristocrats

We're excited to announce Stanford University Libraries' release of the French Revolution Digital Archive web site (FRDA): frda.stanford.edu

FRDA is the result of a multi-year collaboration of the Stanford University Libraries and the Bibliothèque nationale de France (BnF) to produce a digital version of the key research sources of the French Revolution and make them available to the international scholarly community. 

4chan forum logo

The free-for-all, anything-goes nature of anonymous posting to discussions boards is a defining feature of Internet subculture, and arguably nowhere has this practice been more vigorous or virulent than on 4ChanNow those notorious anonymous posts are available from the SDR

Open tape reel from Gerhard Samuel Collection, ARS.0049

During the fall of 2013, Stanford University Libraries (SUL) convened a working group to investigate the current state of access to audio and moving image materials held within its various collections, notably rare materials within its different special collections departments, along with those held at the Hoover Institution Library and Archives. 

Following many weeks of investigation, the Media Access Working Group (MAWG) produced a report in December 2013 outlining its findings, along with various recommendations to help tackle the issues discovered. The group considered issues relating to use cases, copyright status, available technologies - including media streaming, and content usage. 

Image from Fred Buenzle photograph album available online (M1983; xz190hb3188_00_047)

Fred J. Buenzle papers. circa 1870-1946 (M1983) 

Just after the earlier article announcing the opening of this collection came out, a photograph album in the collection was digitized. It contains eighty fading silver gelatin prints which include images of Naval training in Guantanamo Bay and other images in and around Havana, Cuba.

                            

Stanford University Library's (SUL) collaboration with the California Audiovisual Preservation Project (CAVPP) has yielded two more preserved objects on the Internet Archive: 

The Dragmaticon is Williams' revision, made ca. 1144-50, of his most important work, De Philosophia Mundi. Written in dramatic dialogue form, the Dragmaticon touches on all aspects of "The science of the world," i.e. astronomy, geography, meteorology and medicine. Further, it attempts to reconcile discrepancies between church doctrine and scientific observation.

In December, approximately 366,000, files representing over 43,000 items were accessioned into the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR). These materials include -- but are not limited to -- items from the Jarnydce Collection, TRAIL Maps Project, and the Revs Digital Library.

SMPL's open door

The Stanford Media Preservation Lab (SMPL) has completed installation of audio and video digitization equipment in its new facilities at 425 Broadway in Redwood City, and has resumed all services. We're 100% back to work, supporting researcher access to SUL's world-class collections of sound recordings and moving images. 

Amerique  (for more, go to: http://purl.stanford.edu/sr890jc8685)

Author Rebecca Solnit was co-sponsored by the Stanford University Libraries and the Bill Lane Center for the American West as a visiting researcher and spent time with us during the Winter and Spring of 2013. During this time, she explored the library's newly acquired collection of historic maps that curiously depict California as an island off the West coast of North America. In a recent article she reports on her time here at Stanford in an article entitled  "An Island Is Anything Surrounded By Difference: Thoughts on Maps and History." In the article she refers to her earlier connection with California's maps when she worked on her atlas of San Francisco and reminisces about talking to David Rumsey who had first mentioned to her about Glen McLaughlin and his collection of Maps of California as an Island. Her article is well worth a read, stirs up your interest in this cartographic phenomenon, and whets the appetite for more. For more on her, visit her profile here and to view the collection please visit the collection available via the library catalog. 

 

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