Blog topic: Digital library

Doug Menuez's photographs on display at the Computer History Museum

July 17, 2014
by Glynn Edwards

In 1985, Steve Jobs gave Meneuz complete access to NeXT and he spent the next decade photographing over seventy companies, innovators, and investors in Silicon Valley. The Computer History Museum has a current exhibit up in their lobby of Meneuz’s photographs that runs through September 7th - Fearless Genius: The Digital Revolution in Silicon Valley 1985–2000. The images in this exhibit are part of

Black Flag poster

SDR Deposits of the Weeks: Catching up

Our blog series highlighting new materials deposited to the Stanford Digital Repository has been on a quasi-hiatus for the last few months. But don't let the quiet fool you: deposit activity in the SDR has been stronger than ever!  In this catch-up post, we draw attention to some of the most exciting items and collections added to the SDR recently. Also keep your eyes open for more Deposit of the Week posts throughout the summer! A number of SUL staffers have been working hard to build digital collections of current work by Stanford students and faculty through the use of the SDR Online Deposit application, and they are going to tell you all about it.

So Long, and Thanks for all the Fish

Steven Meretzky game design scans available in Green Library reading room

Steven Meretzky is a pioneer in the computer games industry. His decades-long career includes experience working as a quality assurance analyst, game designer, product designer, and writer. Most of his signature contributions to the industry occurred while he was employed at Infocom, Inc., which was a prolific and highly-acclaimed publisher of text adventure games back in the 1980s. His most famous collaboration was with Douglas Adams on the computer game version of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – a text adventure game that is notorious for its arcane and difficult puzzles. 

Text adventures are also known as interactive fiction and are played completely through simple instructions that the player types into a computer program. The computer translates these instructions (ex. “go north,” “get lamp,” etc.) and responds with prepared text, unfolding a story on screen for the player. Meretzky’s skills for creating these type of narrative games led to his inclusion as one of only two game writers in the Science Fiction Writers of America (the other being Dave Lebling, one of his colleagues at Infocom.)

Cover Image of People's Computer Company

People's Computer Company/Homebrew Computer Club

May 28, 2014
by Doris C. Cheung

If you were a student in Professor Fred Turner’s recent communications class, you’ve already seen a few issues of newsletters of the People's Computer Company.  If not, check out these publications documenting the progress of early computing in the 1970’s, available for the first time in digital form.

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