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December 13 is a momentous date in the history of the Stanford Digital Repository. It's the date in 2012 when the very first research data item was deposited in the SDR through our online deposit application. Which makes Dec. 13, 2014, the second anniversary of this historic occasion!

Who was our first depositor, how did he find us, and what did he deposit? 

A wild duck lands on Lake Lagunita

Water in the West is a multi-year joint program of the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment and the Bill Lane Center for the American West.  It is a place where faculty, staff and students from the natural, physical and social sciences, law, business and humanities who engage in interdisciplinary research and teaching about freshwater can meet and collaborate while tackling the challenge of water security affected by a growing population, collapsing ecosystems, crumbling infrastructure, evolving economies, conflicting values and a less predictable and more volatile climate.

SLAC Early website "We had no idea that we were making history and were just trying to get the job done in our 'spare' time',”  Louise Addis, one of the WWWizards team who developed the SLAC website from 1991, said during our conversation about the restoration of SLAC's earliest website. Last May, Nicholas Taylor, web archiving service manager, told me, "SLAC has a historical collection of webpages that may be the first website in the US. Can we help them to find a home for this archive?” As Web archivist, I felt that I found a treasure. I replied, "Of course, Stanford Web Archive Portal should be the home."

One of the major use cases for the Web Archiving Service is preserving Stanford University web content. The earliest SLAC website represent the oldest such content we could find; it is the first website in the US dated to 1991, so we started there. Stanford Web Archiving Service launched its portal this week which featured SLAC's earliest website that was kept on SLAC servers for many years. This Halloween, it comes back to life. Our task was to convert the original list of scattered files into an accessible, browsable website with temporal navigation. In this post, I will discuss the technical challenges of and lessons learned from restoration process.

Professor John Willinsky

John Willinsky waited for a couple of weeks after the fall quarter had started to give the Graduate School of Education (GSE) faculty and students some time to settle in to their routines before sending out the big news:

San Francisco Ferry Building and streetcar: one of thousands of images used by the Image, Video, and Multimedia Systems research team to test image search algorithms

When you think about scientific data, you might think primarily about numbers and graphs and charts. But some data sets consist of rich image collections, including these data sets that have been preserved in the Stanford Digital Repository!

 

BitCurator workshop

Porter Olsen from the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) hosted a full-day webinar at Stanford University on Friday, August 29, 2014 to introduce archivists from Stanford University Libraries, the Hoover Institute, and UC Berkeley’s Bancroft Library to BitCurator, an open-source all-in-one suite of digital forensics tools.

Volvo CE 310X

For the second year in a row, students from ME310 Project Based Engineering Design submitted their final projects to the SDR for preservation. With the submission of these 19 projects, we also preserved the Winter quarter reports for the students’ design projects.   This year’s projects covered a variety of products from construction equipment to designing a better way to chill a drink to creating a better flying experience for passengers with limited mobility.  These projects help inform future classes about design process as well as create a network of contacts for future work. 

Image from Brady, et al, DOI: 10.1016/j.neuron.2014.06.024

"We would like to provide high resolution images of brain slices for the research community to view. Would the [Stanford] Digital Repository be able to host our image data for this purpose?"

Have you ever had a similar question about how to make your research data available for other people to access? The Stanford Digital Repository is a great place to share research data of all kinds, including imagery.

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