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Cover image for powerpoint for Mari Tanabe's Honors Thesis, "A Body of Work: Anatomy of an Eating Disorder."

The Program in Feminist Studies at Stanford has been around since 1981, but in 2013 the program officially changed its name to the Program in Feminist, Gender and Sexuality Studies in order to be more inclusive of the broader range of scholarship related to gender and sexuality research. For the history of this name change, please see the story in "Gender News". Apropos of the name change, 2013 also marks the first year that the program's undergraduate honors theses have been archived as digital files in the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR).

"[T]he oceans have always belonged to the clams."

At least from a metabolic perspective, according to Earth Sciences Professor Jonathan Payne and his co-authors. The researchers have just published an article in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences about the struggle for dominance between brachiopods and bivalves.

4chan forum logo

The free-for-all, anything-goes nature of anonymous posting to discussions boards is a defining feature of Internet subculture, and arguably nowhere has this practice been more vigorous or virulent than on 4ChanNow those notorious anonymous posts are available from the SDR

Open tape reel from Gerhard Samuel Collection, ARS.0049

During the fall of 2013, Stanford University Libraries (SUL) convened a working group to investigate the current state of access to audio and moving image materials held within its various collections, notably rare materials within its different special collections departments, along with those held at the Hoover Institution Library and Archives. 

Following many weeks of investigation, the Media Access Working Group (MAWG) produced a report in December 2013 outlining its findings, along with various recommendations to help tackle the issues discovered. The group considered issues relating to use cases, copyright status, available technologies - including media streaming, and content usage. 

Stanford University Library's (SUL) collaboration with the California Audiovisual Preservation Project (CAVPP) has yielded two more preserved objects on the Internet Archive: 

Stanford Mendicants 1976/1977 - Album Cover

Ahead of their 50th anniversary show this Saturday (October 26th) at the Bing Concert Hall, I am very pleased to announce the successful recent completion of a 6 month project aimed at archiving and digitally preserving the Stanford Mendicants' complete recorded output between 1964-2012.

San Francisco Ferry Building and streetcar: one of thousands of images used by the Image, Video, and Multimedia Systems research team to test image search algorithms

Some of the items most recently deposited to the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR) include thousands of images that are nothing short of, well, ordinary. For instance, in the Names 100 Dataset, you can download a folder containing 80,000 small images depicting the faces of ordinary people. In another case, there are millions of snapshots of San Francisco street scenes and buildings. Each image is notable for its lack of distinction.  It’s as if anyone could have captured these images using their smartphone. And that is precisely the point.

What do you get when you combine 14 library staff, the John A. Blume Center for Earthquake Engineering Technical Reports, the SDR self-deposit interface, and pizza? A Deposit-a-thon, of course!

A lot of valuable research done on Stanford's campus is published as part of technical reports, and as valued research output there is no better place to preserve these -- and make them easily accessible to the world -- than through the Stanford Digital Repository.

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