Blog topic: Digital preservation

ePADD v3.0 release, upcoming hackathon, and spring presentations

We are thrilled to announce the final release of ePADD v3.0, which introduces an entity merge interface, unique IDs, greater customization options, UI changes, and other fixes. Grab the new version and view the complete release notes here: https://github.com/ePADD/epadd/releases. Additional updates (including news about an upcoming hackathon and spring presentations) after the jump...

Personal Digital Archiving (PDA) submission deadline is November 25

November 22, 2016
by Josh Schneider

How do we choose to document and share information about ourselves, our activities, and our communities? What happens to all of the data people create over their lifetimes? How can an information professional or researcher make sense of the various digital strands, remnants, and data that comprise a 21st century life?

Stanford University Libraries is thrilled to be hosting Personal Digital Archiving (PDA) from March 29-31, 2017. PDA 2017 will focus on current and emerging trends and scholarship in personal information management and personal digital archiving. The deadline to submit a proposal is Friday, November 25.

Microscopy image by Juan G. Cueva and Miriam B. Goodman

SDR Deposit of the Week: Data on Exhibit

For nearly four years, the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR) has been home to the research outputs of scientists and scholars from across Stanford’s campus. But while those data files, videos, source code, microscopy images, survey results, maps and more have been discoverable and accessible through the Libraries’ online catalog, SearchWorks, it has been hard to get an overview of all the available data. Until now.

Stanford University Libraries in Redwood City - construction photo

Library departments in Redwood City relocating (again) this fall

Most of the community is aware of the planned development for Stanford’s Redwood City Campus. What few of you may be aware of is that four departments from the Stanford University Libraries (SUL) moved out to Redwood City three years ago. We have been working out of 425 Broadway which is one of the buildings slated for demolition. The development of the new campus necessitates SUL’s relocation from 425 across the street to 500 Broadway – the former home of AMPEX.

The four units moving are: Stanford University Press, Conservation Services, Stanford Media Preservation Lab, and Technical Services branch of Special Collections. SUL staff in these four units have been working for over a year with SUL’s Facilities Department on planning for this interim space. I say interim, because in another 2.5 years, we’ll be moving back onto the new campus. 

Water jet with x-ray pulse

SDR Deposit of the Week: Liquid explosions

When Stanford Digital Repository staff found out someone was depositing research data about using x-ray lasers to explode jets of liquid, I have to admit there was a bit of excitement. Researching explosions (even on a small scale) sounds like an immense amount of fun. But Stanford researcher Claudiu Stan and his colleagues were doing way more important things out at SLAC than just having fun. They were performing serious research into fluid dynamics.

Zambian 2006 to 2010 Constituency and Ward Boundaries PURL

SDR Deposit of the Week: Earthworks in action against cholera

May 26, 2016
by Mr. Stace D Maples

Inquiry from a hot zone

In late March of 2016, Frederic Ham, a geospatial analyst for Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF, also know as Doctors Without Borders) contacted Stanford University Libraries (SUL) looking for information. He needed data to help him create maps so that MSF could better plan their response to a current cholera outbreak in Zambia. He’d found what he wanted via SUL’s geospatial data portal, Earthworks, but wasn’t able to access it due to licensing restrictions. Was there any way we could help?

SDR Deposit of the Week: Oral history interview with John Chowning

On September 2nd, 2015, I had the great privilege of conducting an oral history interview with John Chowning, Professor Emeritus at Stanford’s Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). Chowning, a pioneer in the world of computer music, is perhaps best known as the inventor of Frequency Modulation (FM) synthesis. His discovery was eventually licensed to Yamaha who integrated it into a number of instruments, most importantly, the DX7, the world’s first mass-produced digital synthesizer, released in 1983. The DX7 is generally regarded as one of the most important musical instrument inventions of the past 50 years, and was widely adopted by artists across multiple genres in the 1980s. My interview with Chowning is now available via the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR). Chowning and I principally sat down to discuss Leon Theremin’s visit to Stanford in 1991, which Chowning organized and oversaw. Stanford University Libraries recently digitize video footage of this visit which included a day long symposium at CCRMA and an evening concert in Frost Amphiteatre at which Theremin, Max Mathews, and many other notable figures from the world of electronic and computer music at the time performed. However, Professor Chowning and I also discussed additional topics including Chowning's background in computer music, his history at Stanford and the inception of CCRMA, and his close personal and professional relationship with Max Mathews. 

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