Blog topic: Digital preservation

We the People petition for open access to ALL govt information

March 17, 2013
by Mr. James R. (Librarian) Jacobs

As part of Sunshine Week -- and in conjunction with the White House's new policy on Open Access to federally funded scientific information -- a small group of government information librarians has started a petition on petitions.whitehouse.gov asking the Obama Administration to assure that there is free permanent public access to ALL authentic government information.

SDR Deposit of the Week: Salmon [data] migration success

March 16, 2013
by Amy E. Hodge

Imagine this scenario:

You worked hard on your research project and are publishing your results in a well-respected journal. You even go so far as to carefully organize the supporting data so that you can share the details of your experiments with others by posting these data online on your web space at Stanford. And you publish that URL in your journal article so everyone will know where to go.

Time passes, and you move on to another institution and another research project. But your data no longer has a home. Once you leave Stanford your web space is no longer accessible. Other researchers find your paper and are interested in your data, but when they type in the URL, all they see is a big ugly notice that says, "Access Denied."

SMPL Renews Partnership with California Audiovisual Preservation Project

July 26, 2012
by Michael Angeletti

In an important collaboration this month, Stanford Media Preservation Lab and the Department of Special Collections & University Archives are participating in the California Audiovisual Preservation Project, a pioneering statewide initiative, for a third round in a row. The CAVPP is providing funds to reformat film and video selections from SULAIR’s collections, including newly resurrected video from the Stanford Prison Experiment and the Stanford University Film Collection. These items will be sent to an outside vendor with the equipment necessary to capture preservation-quality digital files from these unique materials in obsolete formats. The digitized content will be preserved in the Stanford Digital Repository and made broadly available to the public through the California Light and Sound collection at the Internet Archive.

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