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The Archive of Recorded Sound recently collaborated with the Bing Stanford in Washington program to provide digitized images from the Archive's Grover Sales Collection (ARS.0016) for an evening event at the program in late January which served to launch both a new arts track at Bing Stanford in Washington, and provide students from both Stanford and nearby Duke Ellington School of the Arts with an insight into the role jazz played in African American history and civil rights through the early to middle part of the 20th century.  The event  featured a display of enlarged wall mounted images of Duke Ellington, Billy Strayhorn, and Ethel Waters, sourced from the Grover Sales Collection, digitized from 35mm negative slides. Grover Sales (1920-2004), a Bay Area author, jazz critic, and teacher, who regularly taught jazz history here at Stanford, amassed the image portion of his collection from various sources for use during his classes.  

By Deardra Fuzzell and Wayne Vanderkuil
A historic geologic map, the data for which was compiled over the course of many years by one determined man, William Smith. Completed nearly 2 centuries ago, it remains incredibly relevant.

This is one of the largest and most difficult oversized objects Stanford has digitized thus far.
See how the Digital Production Group went about imaging this unique item.

The Archive of Recorded Sound is pleased to announce the launch of a substantially updated finding aid for the Issei Oral History Project in Watsonville Collection. In addition to many other notable improvements, which include English summaries of each interview from the collection and additional subject headings to aid discovery, the new finding aid now includes streaming audio of each recorded interview. The finding aid is available on the Online Archive of California.

The San Francisco History Expo is this weekend (March 1-2, 2014) at the Old Mint. Some very early video footage from the Ampex Corp collection at Stanford will be on view there.

This footage -- preserved through the state-wide California Audiovisual Preservation Project -- is special because it demonstrates Ampex's first portable video recorder, the VR-3000. It depicts scenes recorded on a San Francisco cable car going steeply down (probably) California Street in 1967!

We are pleased to welcome Pennington Ahlstrand to Special Collections. Penny has accepted a position as the Project Archivist for the Gordon Moore project and will be working primarily out of our new Redwood City location. 

Penny has worked as a corporate archivist and archival consultant in the Bay Area since 1997. For over 10 years she worked part-time on large processing projects at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory – most notably the Web Wizards collection (the first US website was at SLAC), the papers of Nobel laureate and former SLAC director Burton Richter, and the papers of the man who built SLAC and was its first director: W.K.H. "Pief" Panofsky.

This is Penny’s third position in Special Collections. She began at Stanford working on the processing team for the Apple Computer Inc. records held by Stanford University Library. Most recently, she is completing a CLIR grant for the University Archives division to process the Stephen Schneider papers. She now comes full circle and returns to the Manuscripts division.

 

 

By Astrid J. Smith and Wayne Vanderkuil.
An object associated with demure and lady-like behavior, the captions underneath each detailed etched vignette on this 1797 fan are surprisingly wry, witty, and thought provoking. Once commonplace, no self-respecting Georgian era lady would be without such an object. As Leah Marie Brown states, “Fans were must-have accoutrements for ladies of 18th century. They were used to perform multiple functions: They could offer a gentle breeze in an overheated room, allow the user to spy on people behind her (some fans had small mirrors on their sticks), conceal gossiping lips, and convey a secret (or not so secret) message.”
See how Digital Production Group went about imaging this unique ladies' fan.

Clayman Institute for Gender Research

The University Archives and Media Preservation Lab are pleased to announce that more than 800 audiorecordings from the Michelle R. Clayman Institute have been digitized and are now streaming online. The recordings document seminars, talks, conferences, and lectures held at the Institue from 1973-2004.

A compact cassette from the Clayman institute on Gender Studies SC0705

The recent digitization of cassettes from the Clayman Institute for Gender Research was a reminder of the wide range of collection sizes preserved by SMPL. This entry will give a brief description of why this collection is interesting and how it relates to the multiple workflows of the Stanford Media Preservation Lab. 

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