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Segmented Map for Vectorization Study, Stanford University Libraries

 The discovery of a particular scanning defect called Bayer moiré, occured while creating image files at Stanford University Library's Map Scanning Lab and prompted a more focused study. The Bayer moiré defect affects the ability of software to lift features from maps digitally. An analysis of findings has supported developing a better understanding of color filter array technology and some of its associated quality issues: rationales for on-demand file remediation of affected image files, options for map imaging in the future, an effective and open-source approach for vectorization, performance improvements for producing and vectorizing raster images.

An article on this study, authored by Matt Pearson, G. Salim Mohammed, Renzo Sanchez-Silva and Patricia Carbajales, which includes additional quality control measures for imaging large maps and a refinement of the topo raster image specification is now published in the Fall 2013 issue of the Journal of Map & Geography Libraries: Advances in Geospatial Information, Collections & Archives, entitled "Stanford University Libraries Study: Topographical Map Vectorization and the Impact of Bayer Moiré Defect."  For more details please read the article.

BrowZine is a tablet application that lets you browse, read and monitor thousands of scholarly journals available from the Stanford University Libraries.


•    Browse titles by subject to easily find journals of interest
•    Create a personal bookshelf of favorite journals
•    Be alerted when a new issue of a journal is published
•    Save articles in your personal library.  BrowZine can easily be synced up with Box.com, Mendeley, Zotero, and other services to help keep all of your information together in one place. 

Open Web Logo

The Open Web Camp V was held last weekend, July the 13th at the PayPal Town Hall in San Jose, CA. It featured diverse speakers on a wide range of topics spanning different aspects of the Open Web Platform and beyond. These included  HTML5, CSS3, Web Accessibility, Responsive Web Design and Mobile Technology topics, but also provide opportunities for networking with peers. Participants were equally drawn from diverse backgrounds including education institutions (Stanford, and SUL staff attended), e-commerce, non-profits, business, open source activists and hobbyists among others. Two of the sessions - one on mobile web performance presented by web developer Estelle Weyl, and another on stifling patterns among teams by Bill Scott, SVP of UI Engineering at PayPal will be reviewed, with an emphasis on aspects relevant to SUL.

3D Printer at Stanford Law School Event

Yesterday's panel discussion at Stanford Law School on 3D printing aroused more questions than it answered, especially given the diverse perspectives, assumptions, interests and even misunderstanding among the general public and within professional circles regarding what it is, it's wider implications and who, when and where (if found necessary) should regulate it. Legal issues stemming from product liability in cases of injury, copyright and patent infringement, as well as freedom and protections accorded to manufacturers, sellers and user were discussed. Similarities were drawn between the advent of the internet and the current 3D printing movement

Google Chrome icon

Chromebooks are low-cost, ultra-portable, secure, fast, "web-based" computing devices running ChromeOS, a complete operating system based on the Google Chrome web browser. They are optimized for Google Apps and off-line saving and editing of your Google Docs.

Samsung Chromebooks are now available for 7-day loan at the Terman Engineering Library!

Leonar3do

Interested in 3D computer-aided design?  Come learn how to use Leonar3do to design 3D objects in a virtual 3D space.  


Friday, May 10th at 4:30pm
Terman Engineering Library
Huang Engineering Center, Room 201

world wide web

Twenty years ago, 30 April 1993,  Tim Berners-Lee went live with the first web site at CERN. At the same time, he released the code that defined the Web, the first version of HTML, free for the world to use to create a new communications medium.

Two decades on, the world is a different place because of his foresight and generosity. Now, without the Web, huge multi-national companies simply wouldn’t exist. When Web access is lost, through error or malfeasance, companies that have transitioned most or all of their activities to the Web stand to lose millions of dollars during the interruption.

See the original web site and consider how far the Web has come. While simple and plain, it points out the underlying truth that the Web is about information, not glitz.

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