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Dr. Steve Schneider talks about how he became interested in earth systems and in atmospheric research in this excerpt from an interview done by Gray Thompson in 1992

“I was actually born in New York City. I didn’t live in it until I went back to Columbia University 17 years later. And I grew up in [Woodmere,] Long Island. And what I remember enjoying a lot about Long Island before the developers hacked down all the woods was getting dropped off in a square mile of woods which I used to call “the deep, dark forest…” and run around and just enjoy streams and nature.

Did you know there were 56 signers to the Declaration of Independence? You can read more about them and other Independence Day facts in this Fourth of July Facts for Features from the United States Census Bureau.

Abraham Tewolde

It is my pleasure to introduce Abraham Tewolde, a new intern at the Archive of Recorded Sound who is taking part in Stanford University Libraries 1st-generation summer intern program this summer.  During his time here Abraham will be learning how a sound archive functions and operates, including work on finding aids, digitization, inventory control, accessioning, and research skills.

Abraham will also be a guest blogger during his time here. Please enjoy below the first of a series of posts Abraham will be offering over the summer. 

On last Friday's show, Rachel Maddow admitted to being a "total dork" about the Oxford English Dictionary. She closed the show with a piece -- titled "Refer Madness" which made me chuckle :-) -- about a bibliographic mystery currently stumping OED staff. In checking their citations, they've come across 51 definitions -- including "Fringy," "Chapelled," "Scavage," and "Whinge" -- in which the first cited reference for those words is in a book entitled "Meanderings of Memory" by Nightlark. The problem is that nobody at OED can actually find the book. I looked quickly in our Searchworks catalog, and in Worldcat to no avail.

So they're appealing for help from the public in hunting down this book. Check out the comments to the OED story to see how far the public has gotten. There's much more to the story in this New Yorker article "Have you seen this book? an OED mystery" by Sasha Weiss. Can you help?

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

International Women's Day is a worldwide celebration of "the economic, political and social achievements of women past, present and future. In some places like China, Russia, Vietnam and Bulgaria, International Women's Day is a national holiday." The official United Nations theme for International Women's Day 2013 is "A promise is a promise: Time for action to end violence against women." Please check out our guide to Feminist Studies in Stanford University Libraries, with links to databases, journals, and more. The Program in Feminist Studies sponsors all sorts of events on campus. See also the Events page on Stanford's website.

Shelves of books at Chemistry & Chemical Engineering Library

In late December, we surveyed Stanford faculty in the Schools of Humanities & Sciences, Engineering, Education, and Earth Sciences about the “many kinds of resources that might be important to your research”. We are still working on a full analysis of all the data generated by the survey, but wanted to go ahead and start sharing some initial results.

The first set of questions asked faculty “How important are the following types of scholarly materials for your research?”, following by a list of various types of resources. Response choices were: Very Important, Important, Somewhat Important, Not Important. Below are some general results from those questions, broken down by Humanities & Arts faculty, Social Sciences faculty (including Graduate School of Education), and Science & Engineering faculty (including School of Earth Sciences).

  • 90% of faculty say Print Books are Important or Very Important to their research. Faculty in the Humanities and Arts are most enamored of Print Books, with 96% rating them as Important or Very Important. Large majorities of Social Scientists (90%) and Science & Engineering (79%) faculty also rate Print Books as Important or Very Important.
  • E-Books are also Important or Very Important to a majority of faculty in all disciplines: 75% in Humanities & Arts, 65% in Social Sciences, 68% in Science & Engineering. 
  • Nearly all faculty (over 94% across all disciplines) say E-Journals are Important or Very Important; but Print Journals are Important or Very Important primarly to those in Humanities and the Arts (76%). Only 36% of Science and Engineering faculty, and only 28% of Social Sciences faculty rate Print Journals as Important or Very Important.
  • Textual Data are important to many Humanities (44%) and Social Science (38%) faculty, but much less so to Science & Engineering faculty (9%). Maps and Geospatial data are important to 25% of faculty overall, with slightly more interest from Social Scientists than from Humanists or Science & Engineering faculty.
  • For all the other kinds of resources we asked about, the differences between disciplines are large and not particularly surprising. Numeric data is important to more Social Science (62%) and Science & Engineering faculty (55%) than Humanities faculty (19%). Archival materials, non-English language materials, reference works, images, film, video and audio are all important to much larger percentages of Humanists than to Social Scientists and Science & Engineering faculty.
  • Response rates: Our overall response rate was 17%, with Humanities & Arts faculty twice as likely (N=68, 29%) as Social Sciences (N=32, 15%) or Science & Engineering faculty (N=57, 13%) to respond. A total of 157 faculty members took the time to respond, and we are very grateful to them.

We also asked several open-ended questions about how faculty accessed resources and what might improve their access to resources that are important to them. We asked similar questions about a variety of tools (e.g. the library website, SearchWorks, bibliographic management software), and expertise (e.g. subject librarians, data specialists). We will post results from those questions soon, as we continue to work on a full analysis of the data. 

The Bing Wing of Green Library

On Wednesday the population of the United States hit 314,159,265, or pi (3.14159265) times 100 million. The Census Bureau marked this milestone with a very charming press release.

You can use SearchWorks to find material from the Census Bureau here in Green Library.