Blog topic: Geospatial

2017 NGAC membership

National Geospatial Advisory Committee spring meeting

April 5, 2017
by Julie Sweetkind-Singer

The National Geospatial Advisory Committee (NGAC) held its first meeting of the year in Washington, D.C. on March 21-22, 2017.  The NGAC is a Federal Advisory Committee (FACA) to the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC).  The role of the NGAC is to provide advice and recommendations related to the national geospatial program and the development of the National Spatial Data Infrastructure.

A productive week at Geo4LibCamp 2017

February 7, 2017
by Darren Hardy PhD

Geo4LibCamp is a hands-on meeting to bring together those building repository and associated services for geospatial data to share best practices, solve common problems, and address technical issues. We met at Stanford University for the second Geo4LibCamp unconference from January 30 until February 3, 2017. Nearly 50 attendees from 30 institutions participated in the main three day event, and about 20 attendees for the two day post-conference working sessions. The institutions were primarily academic research libraries -- Alberta, Arizona State, California State, Chicago, Colorado School of Mines, Colorado State, Colorado at Boulder, Connecticut State Library, Cornell, Data Curation Experts, Mapzen, Michigan, Minnesota, Moss Landing Marine Labs, Nebraska at Lincoln, New York U, Northwestern, Notre Dame, Princeton, Purdue, Rice, Stanford, UC Berkeley, UC Davis, UC Riverside, UC Santa Barbara, UC Santa Cruz, UCLA, Wisconsin – Milwaukee, and Yale.

Transparent Chart of the Heavens

The Stunning Early Infographics and Maps of the 1800s

January 31, 2017
by G. Salim Mohammed

Objects from the David Rumsey Map Collection are featured in Atlas Obscura's Map Monday for January 30, 2017, features maps from John Emslie and James Reynolds.From Atlas Obscura's feature: "Have you ever wondered what the tallest active volcano is? Or wanted to compare the height of mountain peaks and the lengths of rivers around the world?

2016 NGAC

NGAC releases transition documents

January 13, 2017
by Julie Sweetkind-Singer

The National Geospatial Advisory Committee (NGAC) has released three documents of interest to the geospatial community.  Two of the documents were written to aid in the transition to a new administration in Washington, DC.  The third document is an overview of emerging technologies that will impact the geospatial landscape in the near- and mid-term future.  Taken together, these works provide a broad overview of the thinking of the NGAC members as they look forward to the next few years in the geospatial sector.

GIS Day @Stanford

GIS Day @Stanford is coming, November 16th!

November 10, 2016
by Mr. Stace D Maples

GIS Day is an annual celebration of geospatial technologies, held on the Wednesday of Geography week. The Stanford Geospatial Center uses GIS Day as an opportunity to connect Stanford researchers to the cutting edge of geospatial technologies, services and applications through talks, workshops and other activities. This year, we'll have analysts, developers and scientists from DigitalGlobe, Mapbox, CARTO, NASA, The National Geospatial Intelligence Agency and more, talking about their work to leverage geospatial data and technologies using machine learning, drones, satellite imagery, and historical data! 

Geospatial discussions at Hydra Connect 2016

October 19, 2016
by Darren Hardy PhD

During Hydra Connect 2016 in Boston this October, we had several discussions around geospatial repository services. There was a half-day workshop and presentation on GeoConcerns -- part of the Hydra Geospatial Data Modeling Working Group chaired by Eliot Jordan; a panel discussion on sharing geospatial metadata; and a meeting of the Hydra Geospatial Interest Group.

Microscopy image by Juan G. Cueva and Miriam B. Goodman

SDR Deposit of the Week: Data on Exhibit

For nearly four years, the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR) has been home to the research outputs of scientists and scholars from across Stanford’s campus. But while those data files, videos, source code, microscopy images, survey results, maps and more have been discoverable and accessible through the Libraries’ online catalog, SearchWorks, it has been hard to get an overview of all the available data. Until now.

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