You are here

Manuscripts

RSS

DRAFT of wire frame for ePADD program.

SUL’s Special Collections received an Innovation Grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission to develop a software program (ePADD) for processing and making email archives discoverable. The end goal is to produce an open-source tool that will allow repositories and individuals to interact with email archives before and after they have been transferred to a repository. It would consist of four modules, each based on a different functional activity: Processing (arrangement and description), Appraisal (collection development), Discovery (online via the web), and Delivery (access).  

The project website was launched in August 2013 and lists: project goals, work plan, team, and collaborators. A twitter feed for the project was just launched although project updates and news will primarily be posted iSpecial Collections Unbound.  

Buenzle scrapbook photo

     In 1886, a sixteen-year-old named Fred Buenzle did what many boys had dreamed of: joining the Navy and sailing the high seas. Recognizing that the Navy was changing rapidly, he took note of the stories and lore of old salts and devoted himself to chronicling his own adventures; training in the Caribbean, briefly leaving the service in China, and in Cuba during the Spanish-American War. A stenographer who rose in rank to Chief Yeoman, Buenzle was the court reporter for the investigation of the sinking of the U.S.S. Maine, and took dictation for many of the Navy’s highest officers, including Theodore Roosevelt when he was briefly Secretary. Buenzle also founded and edited “The Bluejacket,” the first newsletter for enlisted men, and fought against discrimination of uniformed sailors.

     Special Collections has recently acquired and processed the Fred J. Buenzle papers, which contain scrapbooks, unpublished manuscripts, and hundreds of photographs documenting his naval career, family, and subsequent retirement at his ranch in Los Gatos.

St. Thomas, 1891

Albumen print of St. Thomas from Buenzle scrapbook, May 1891.

 

Section relating to Special Collections Technical Services at SUL's Redwood City location.

Changes are on the horizon for Special Collections’ Technical Services Divisions - specifically the Rare Book Cataloging and Manuscripts Units. A few recent posts have referred to our imminent move to SUL’s Redwood City (RWC) location, so here finally is some information about this event. The Rare Book Cataloging Unit is the first to move and is being relocated over the Labor Day weekend; the Manuscripts Technical Services Unit will move there around the end of October.

The records of Road & Track were given to Stanford University Libraries by Hearst Corporation, Inc. in October 2012. (Please see Stanford Report Dec. 11, 2012 for details.)

Beginning in early 2013 a box survey of the collection was begun and has just been completed this August. Plans are now afoot to create an index of feature articles in the Road & Track magazine this fall before the Manuscripts Unit relocates to SUL’s Redwood City location.

Processing of the collection will begin after the relocation and the hiring of a project archivist. Funds for processing have been provided in part by Stanford’s Revs Program

In addition to relocating the Manuscripts Division of Special Collections to SUL’s Redwood City (RWC) Location in October, the division is moving ahead with a recently funded Educational collections project.

This two-year project will prioritize processing for collections that contain or focus on the history of education. Those identified at this point are the records of EdSource (educational policy and legislation), and the Amado Padilla papers (faculty in the Department of Education at SU), and the Ruth Asawa papers (San Francisco School of the Arts – SOTA).

Sorting drafts of Benoit Mandelbrot's essays.

The Manuscripts Division is please to announce two recent hires: Christy Smith and Joe Geller. Both have been long time soft-funded staff members at the library. 

Stanford University Libraries has just acquired access to a few new databases for scholars working on French and Italian topics! 

Olschki Complete online: All monographs and conference proceedings published between 2000-2011 by the prestigious Italian publishing house Leo S. Olschki are now available online through the Torrossa/Editoria Italiana Online database, along with Italian scholarly publications from many other important publishers. Most of the Olschki titles are on Italian literature and history, but there are also works in other disciplines such as classics, art and art history, philosophy, and musicology. As with other titles in Torrossa, you may download the PDFs in Adobe Acrobat. Mac users need to open Acrobat before opening the PDF - it does not work in Preview.
 
Corpus Montaigne: "Contains all the different editions of the works of Montaigne from the 16th and 17th centuries, published from the manuscripts and the printed originals, including "all the works published in Montaigne's lifetime and after his death by his daughter-in-law, Marie de Gournay, all the editions published from the 16th to the 20th century, their annotation and critical apparatus." Also includes PDF reproductions of selected works."
 
Grand corpus des grammaires françaises, des remarques et des traités sur la langue (XIVe-XVIIe s.) : "The Grand Corpus des grammaires françaises, des remarques et des traités sur la langue XVe-XVIIe siècles (Great Corpus of French language Grammars, Commentaries and Treatises on language (15th-17th centuries)) groups together in one database the Corpus of French Renaissance grammars, the Corpus of French 17th century grammars and the Corpus of remarks on the French language (17th Century). This is close to representing all the French grammars of the 15th and 17th centuries. Each grammar is presented both in a digitalised format identical to the original version and also as a fac-simile. The Great Corpus is unique in that it allows research ranging from basic reference to in-depth academic research, according to the requirements of researchers and students."

The Stanford University Libraries have just acquired the professional papers of novelist Alejandro D. Morales, regarded as one of the leading figures of Chicano literature because of his skill as a writer and his understanding of culture. The collection has been processed and the finding guide is available online.

Pages