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Maps

Eight new digital collections are now available in SearchWorks. Several of these collections take advantage of recently enhanced functionality which better integrates material in the Stanford Digital Repository with data contained in Symphony and enables discovery of and access to media files.

By Deardra Fuzzell and Wayne Vanderkuil
A historic geologic map, the data for which was compiled over the course of many years by one determined man, William Smith. Completed nearly 2 centuries ago, it remains incredibly relevant.

This is one of the largest and most difficult oversized objects Stanford has digitized thus far.
See how the Digital Production Group went about imaging this unique item.

Planisfero del mondo vecchio, 1691?

Hemispheres in cartography refer to slicing the globe into spherical halves. Generally, hemispheres we see in maps are Northern or Southern, where the equator is the dividing line and Eastern and Western, or where the prime meridian, East and West of 180˚ longitude, bisects the two. 

A collection of six maps from Glen McLaughlin's Map Collection of California as an Island, give you a peek at a few hemispheric maps published between 1683 and 1807 and show how hemispheres were sliced differently on maps between the 17th and 19th century. Visit Branner Library to view them in person. The exhibit will run from until April 23, 2014.

San Francisco from the David Rumsey Map Collection: SFO Airport Exhibit

The new exhibit installed at the San Francisco International Airport Museum, comes from the David Rumsey Map Collection, with a few items from Stanford University Libraries and the San Francisco Public Library.  Exhibited in a magnificent space, these iconic set of maps are at the airport exhibition gallery in Terminal 2 (Virgin America and American Airlines). The exhibit is accessible after going through security. The exhibit combines the original maps with digital representations and includes videos and Google Earth overlays.

For more on the exhibit, see their press release.

Check out what Wired has to say about it! Also David himself has blogged about it.

The exhibit is currently open and will remain so until August 3, 2014. If you cannot make it, check out a selection showcased in the digital gallery. You can also browse them in detail at davidrumsey.com.

Many thanks to my colleagues at Branner, Preservation and Special Collections for supporting this exhibit.

 
Amerique  (for more, go to: http://purl.stanford.edu/sr890jc8685)

Author Rebecca Solnit was co-sponsored by the Stanford University Libraries and the Bill Lane Center for the American West as a visiting researcher and spent time with us during the Winter and Spring of 2013. During this time, she explored the library's newly acquired collection of historic maps that curiously depict California as an island off the West coast of North America. In a recent article she reports on her time here at Stanford in an article entitled  "An Island Is Anything Surrounded By Difference: Thoughts on Maps and History." In the article she refers to her earlier connection with California's maps when she worked on her atlas of San Francisco and reminisces about talking to David Rumsey who had first mentioned to her about Glen McLaughlin and his collection of Maps of California as an Island. Her article is well worth a read, stirs up your interest in this cartographic phenomenon, and whets the appetite for more. For more on her, visit her profile here and to view the collection please visit the collection available via the library catalog. 

 

Nova totius Terrarum orbis tabula

During the week of November 4th, Julie Sweetkind-Singer hosted the California Rare Book School (http://www.calrbs.org/) with several sessions held at Stanford University Libraries. The CalRBS is an ongoing program founded by UCLA that educates students interested in the field of rare books. This specific course was designed to provide a general overview of the history of maps in the western world, as well as their use in modern-day teaching and research.

Percentage of Americans who believe global warming has been happening.

The Stanford Geospatial Center has created a series of maps in support of the work of Professor Jon Krosnick who released new state level data on Americans' view of climate change.  Dr. Krosnick, a senior fellow with the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, presented the findings to the congressional Bicameral Task Force on Climate Change.  The Stanford Report released an article on November 13, 2014 discussing Dr. Krosnick's work, which shows that the majority of residents in every state surveyed supported government limits on greenhouse gas emissions, tax breaks to encourage solar power production, and energy efficient appliances. 


Twelve maps were produced by Patricia Carbajales and David Medeiros, both of the Stanford Geospatial Center located in Branner Library.  The maps include visual representations on a state by state basis of the answers to such questions as whether or not global warming has been happening and if it has been caused by humans.  As if often the case, these visualizations allow for enhanced understanding of complex spatial data quickly through the use of a map of the United States.

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