You are here

Music

RSS

Archives

CCRMA Logo

To correspond with the Triple CCRMALite concert and symposium this weekend (Oct 26-27, 2014), the Archive of Recorded Sound and Stanford Media Preservation Lab recently worked to digitized and make available a number of historic performances from Stanford's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics. These recordings, from the CCRMA Tape Archive (ARS.0037), are now available to stream via the Triple CCRMALite website.    


Peg box of a baryton, Brussels (undated)Divertimento 24o per il pariton [original manuscript, 1766]

Link to downloadable images of this work

The baryton [pariton] is a bass instrument in the viol family that may be simultaneously bowed and plucked. It features a double set of strings, the upper set gut, for bowing, the lower set metal, for sympathetic vibration and for plucked accompaniment. The metal strings run the length of the neck behind the fingerboard, which is hollowed in the back to allow the left hand to pluck the strings.

Loosely related to the lyra-viol, the baryton likely originated in seventeenth-century England. Its moment in the sun, however, came in ighteenth-century Austria, at the court of the barytonist Prince Nicholas Esterházy, with music supplied in abundance by his ambitious young Kappelmeister, Joseph Haydn.

Title page of the Bonaparte Edition (detail)

Collection complette des quatuors / d'Haydn ; dédiée au Premier Consul Bonaparte
A Paris : Chez Pleyel, auteur et editeur de musique, [1802]

Link to downloadable images of this work

Goethe described the classical string quartet form as “four rational people conversing,” a type of discourse embodied in the quartets of Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, and Schubert. Haydn, perhaps more than any of his contemporaries, shaped the string quartet into the form we know today, moving away from the typical divertimenti solo with accompaniment, to four equal voices working out thematic material in (often lively) conversation. The complete set of parts featured here is a variant of the first edition of Haydn’s complete string quartets, dedicated to Napoleon Bonaparte, and known as the “Bonaparte Edition,” published by Maison Pleyel in Paris in 1803. 

piano keys

Masterclass Media Foundation of England films and records world-class musicians teaching students or discussing their own approaches to the works with which they are associated.  The medici.tv database makes available 40 of the masterclasses.

Videos on keyboard music include classes with Stephen Kovacevich on Beethoven Piano Concerto no. 2,  Beethoven Piano Sonatas no. 21 and 31, Chopin Fantasy in F minor, op. 49, and Schubert Impromptus nos. 1 and 3, op. 90; András Schiff on Bach Partita no.2, Beethoven late Piano Sonatas, and Schubert Moments Musicaux nos. 1, 3, and 4. There are also masterclasses with Emanuel Ax, Boris Berman, Stephen Hough and Joanna MacGregor.

Steinway Red Welte (1922), detail

In support of a major initiative to bring attention to the study of roll playing musical instruments, the Stanford Archive of Recorded Sound and Department of Music have acquired the Denis Condon Collection of Reproducing Pianos and Rolls, a collection of over 7500 rolls and ten players. The Condon Collection has long been known as one of the most important collections of reproducing pianos and piano rolls in private hands. Leading figures in the field of rolls and players are working along with Stanford faculty and staff on the project. The initiative will include roll preservation through scanning and digitization, restoration of instruments for playback, item level cataloging to allow for content discovery, and research into under-represented or rare systems and rolls. Plans for the collection include making streaming audio files of the recordings available to the public at large.

Music manuscript facsimiles

On display in the Music Library are a variety of facsimiles of musical manuscripts. Items range from a meticulous reproduction of the 15th-century Chansonnier de Jean de Montchenu, a heart-shaped collection of courtly love songs worked with gilt and fine hand illustrations, to a very convincing replica of the notebook page upon which Kurt Cobain penned lyrics for the iconic song Smells Like Teen Spirit.

‘AHAmele – Oakland based Hawaiian Music Ensemble

The Archive of Recorded Sound (ARS) recently took an active role in two courses during the spring semester, one in the Stanford Music Department and the other in the Program in Writing and Rhetoric, to encourage students to deposit their final projects into the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR). The purpose of working with these courses was primarily to introduce students to the SDR and its many benefits, and to walk them through the process of using the SDR's self-deposit tool. This instruction was backed up by customized online screencasts that guided students through the deposit process for the particular sets of materials within their projects. The rate of deposit for both courses was extremely high as the professors in each case elected to make the deposit of final projects into the SDR a mandatory part of the courses' requirements.  

Violin bridge

The Brompton’s Book of Violin and Bow Makers, by Jon Dilworth, is a biographical dictionary of violin (and viola, viola, ‘cello and bass) makers as well as bow makers in Europe and the United States.  Jon Dilworth, violin maker and connoisseur, spent many years collecting this information in part through his association with Amati Instruments Limited, in the form of note cards, photographs, and digital files. The work builds upon the corpus of knowledge of lutherie (the art and craft of making fine stringed instruments) established by earlier seminal works such as Henley’s Universal Dictionary of Violin and Bow Makers, Vannes’ Dictionnaire universel des luthiers, and Lütgendorff’s Die Geigen und Lautenmacher vom Mittelalter bis zur Gegenwart.

Pages