Blog topic: Music

War Memorial Opera House, exterior

Rare opera films online

October 18, 2012
by Ray Heigemeir

Richard Bonelli (1889-1980), an internationally-known baritone and noted voice teacher, performed frequently in San Francisco in the 1920s and 1930s. The Richard Bonelli Collection, consisting of letters, photographs, programs, scores, scrapbooks, and other material, is available to researchers at the Stanford Archive of Recorded Sound. Additionally, a number of commercial recordings featuring Bonelli may be consulted in the Archive, and several CD reissues may be borrowed from the Music Library.

New database: Rock's Backpages

October 9, 2012
by Ray Heigemeir

Rock’s Backpages is one of two new subscription databases now available for use by the Stanford community (Music Industry Data, formerly known as "Academic Chrts Online" is the other).

From the website:

"There are over twenty thousand articles on the site. These feature over two thousand five hundred artists and range from 500-word album (or concert) reviews to 10,000-word interviews and features. 

Privately produced Leopold Auer recording, signed by the artist on June 7, 1920, from the Jascha Heifetz Collection.

Archive of Recorded Sound hidden collections project completed

May 29, 2012
by Ray Heigemeir

The Archive of Recorded Sound has completed the processing of four significant collections under the sponsorship of the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) with funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation which are now ready for use by researchers, students, musicians, and the public.  The creators of all four collections have California connections, but their work and influence extended far beyond state borders to distant regions of the world.

Detail, The Metaphysics of Notation, by Mark Applebaum

The Metaphysics of Notation

February 25, 2011
by Ray Heigemeir

Mark Applebaum, Associate Professor of Composition and Theory in the Department of Music, composed The Metaphysics of Notation specifically for installation at the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford. The complete work includes a full hand-drawn score (72’ in length, in twelve 6’ panels), two corresponding mobiles, and the print now hanging in the Music Library, which reproduces the entire drawn score.

Detail showing shape notes used in four-syllable fasola solmization, in The Easy Instructor (Albany, NY, 1808)

Early American tune books on display in the Music Library

September 24, 2012
by Ray Heigemeir

 

“To please the taste of the public”

Early American Tune Books

(1761 – 1808)

 

Five early American tune books and one facsimile edition are on display in the Music Library through December 2012. Items include William Billings' The Singing Master's Assistant (Boston, 1781); Andrew Law's The Art of Singing (Cheshire, Conn., 1794); and, Jeremiah Ingalls' The Christian Harmony (Exeter, 1805).

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