Blog topic: Music

Detail showing shape notes used in four-syllable fasola solmization, in The Easy Instructor (Albany, NY, 1808)

Early American tune books on display in the Music Library

September 24, 2012
by Ray Heigemeir


“To please the taste of the public”

Early American Tune Books

(1761 – 1808)


Five early American tune books and one facsimile edition are on display in the Music Library through December 2012. Items include William Billings' The Singing Master's Assistant (Boston, 1781); Andrew Law's The Art of Singing (Cheshire, Conn., 1794); and, Jeremiah Ingalls' The Christian Harmony (Exeter, 1805).

Scripting the Sacred exhibition opens today

September 17, 2012
by Christopher Matson

The first part of two-part exhibition Scripting the Sacred opens today, Monday, September 17, in Green Library's Peterson Gallery and Munger Rotunda. According to its website, the exhibition features "Western European manuscripts and fragments, showcases the medieval experience of reading."

From the exhibition's website: 

Music From Math - Digitizing the Works of Max V. Mathews

August 27, 2012
by Geoff Willard

What's the first name you think of when considering the development of electronic music? Edgard Varèse? John Cage? Karlheinz Stockhausen? Now how about computer music? Max Mathews should be at the top of your list. While at Bell Laboratories in 1957, Mathews wrote the program MUSIC, ushering in an era of digital synthesis and composition. MUSIC went through many iterations, but its lasting influence can be seen in contemporary programs such as Max/MSP, itself named after the late pioneer.