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In May, the creators of a new, unique data mining tool -- Enigma -- made a presentation to a group of Political Science Department graduate students. It would be safe to say that the demonstration generated some real interest and excitement. Based in great part on that response from students in the department, the Library has now arranged a long-term beta-test with Enigma for the entire Stanford community. The only other academic institution with this arrangement is the Harvard Business School.

Enigma has ingested, and continues to ingest, digitized public records from the federal government, state governments, international organizations, and from some non-U.S. governments. They began amassing data by making a FOIA request for all U.S. government domain names and then scraped and ingested all of the data available on those sites. They continue to ingest new data every week.

Enigma is very interested in engaging with Stanford scholars to get ideas for additional digital data sets to include in their database. In other words, they really want to hear from you about data that might be valuable to your research. So, as you use Enigma, please take advantage of the Chat function to make suggestions/requests. One caveat -- Enigma does not digitize data. However, they are pretty inventive in finding ways to obtain digital data that should be in the public domain. For example, they take in U.S Customs Service data regarding all containers that pass through U.S. ports. This data is only made available by the Customs Service on CD's, which Enigma uploads on a weekly basis.

Enigma can be accessed by all members of the Stanford community through this link:

http://ezproxy.stanford.edu/login?url=https://app.enigma.io

Here is Enigma's own description of what they are trying to accomplish:

Enigma is a search and discovery platform for big public data that exposes billions of public records across previously siloed datasets. Petabytes of pubic data are created by governments, companies, and independent institutions each year. However, as many of us know, it is tedious (if not impossible in some cases) to navigate and discover connections across these disconnected resources. Enigma empowers its users to search and manipulate these hidden datasets, creating priceless information needed to gain an edge and uncover a universe of untapped knowledge. Whether you are searching for people, companies, places, social, political, and economic trends, or broader topics, Enigma offers depth and resolution into these pools of data that are currently unavailable or underutilized by traditional search portals like Google, Yahoo, and Bing.

Let us know what you think of this new and powerful statistical tool.

Listen to the Silence conference, 2013

The University Archives is pleased to showcase the results of ongoing efforts to collect and make available online born-digital materials from Stanford student organizations. The first such collection to be made available via the Stanford Digital Repository is records of the annual "Listen to the Silence" conference organized by the Asian American Students' Association (AASA).<--break->

Stanford University Libraries has just acquired access to a few new databases for scholars working on French and Italian topics! 

Olschki Complete online: All monographs and conference proceedings published between 2000-2011 by the prestigious Italian publishing house Leo S. Olschki are now available online through the Torrossa/Editoria Italiana Online database, along with Italian scholarly publications from many other important publishers. Most of the Olschki titles are on Italian literature and history, but there are also works in other disciplines such as classics, art and art history, philosophy, and musicology. As with other titles in Torrossa, you may download the PDFs in Adobe Acrobat. Mac users need to open Acrobat before opening the PDF - it does not work in Preview.
 
Corpus Montaigne: "Contains all the different editions of the works of Montaigne from the 16th and 17th centuries, published from the manuscripts and the printed originals, including "all the works published in Montaigne's lifetime and after his death by his daughter-in-law, Marie de Gournay, all the editions published from the 16th to the 20th century, their annotation and critical apparatus." Also includes PDF reproductions of selected works."
 
Grand corpus des grammaires françaises, des remarques et des traités sur la langue (XIVe-XVIIe s.) : "The Grand Corpus des grammaires françaises, des remarques et des traités sur la langue XVe-XVIIe siècles (Great Corpus of French language Grammars, Commentaries and Treatises on language (15th-17th centuries)) groups together in one database the Corpus of French Renaissance grammars, the Corpus of French 17th century grammars and the Corpus of remarks on the French language (17th Century). This is close to representing all the French grammars of the 15th and 17th centuries. Each grammar is presented both in a digitalised format identical to the original version and also as a fac-simile. The Great Corpus is unique in that it allows research ranging from basic reference to in-depth academic research, according to the requirements of researchers and students."
Steven Chu, professor of physics, in laser lab.

The University Archives is pleased to announce the acquisition of a major addition to the Steven Chu papers. The materials, spanning Chu's career, consist of correspondence, research and subject files, teaching files, awards, and posters.

William Shockley

The University Archives has acquired an addition to its William Shockley and Eugenics Collection. The materials, originally part of John B. deC. M. Saunders' files, consist of Foundation for Research and Education on Eugencis and Dysgenics (FREED) correspondence, news clippings, publications and ephemera related to Shockley's work on heredity, I.Q., and race.

The Stanford University Libraries have just acquired the professional papers of novelist Alejandro D. Morales, regarded as one of the leading figures of Chicano literature because of his skill as a writer and his understanding of culture. The collection has been processed and the finding guide is available online.

Encomium Musices, plate 3 [detail]

An annual compilation of significant acquisitions may be found on the Music Library’s web site. The list for 2011-2012 was recently added. Lists go back to 1999-2000.

Included are items acquired by gift or purchase during the academic year, arranged by type of material. Manuscripts, Facsimiles, Operas (librettos and scores), Periodicals, Printed Books, Printed Music, Microform, Recordings, and Miscellany are included. Many items are purchased with endowed gift funds and this is noted in the citations, e.g.  Acquired through the Lucie King Harris Books for Music Fund. Citations are included for materials in both the Music Library and Department of Special Collections, Green Library.

1989 Big Game program

The University Archives is pleased to announce a gift of athletics memorabilia from Gordon Ansley, a lifelong supporter and fan of Stanford Athletics. Included are football programs, including many Big Game programs; media guides; scrapbooks; and game ephemera. The gift adds many historic and contemporary items to the Archives' athletics collections.

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