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Gruesome Spectacles: Botched Executions and America's Death Penalty by Austin Sarat, published by Stanford University Press

Whatever your opinion on the death penalty is, there is no doubt that the three mishandled executions this past year (most recently this week in Arizona) were an unpleasant reminder of the complex nature of the law itself. Legal Scholar Austin Sarat, author of Gruesome Spectacles: Botched Executions and America's Death Penalty, published by Stanford University Press, discussed the subject on NPR's Morning Edition with Steve Inskeep. Sarat provided historical context and an unbiased explanation of the current state of the death penalty in America.

Tape container for Wind (1961)

The Archive of Recorded Sound is delighted to announce that the Richard Maxfield Collection (ARS.0074) can now be listened to online, via the collection's finding aid on the Online Archive of California. This collection features nine distinct works by electronic music composer Richard Maxfield, composed between 1959-1964, four of which are believed to be previously unpublished (Dromenom, Electronic Symphony, Suite from Peripateia, and Wind). Additionally, as Maxfield frequently produced unique edits of his work for each performance, many of the open tape reels that form this collection include alternative edits to those previously published, such as the tapes for Amazing Grace which feature three different versions of the work. 

Starting tomorrow, Stanford-affiliated users may sign up every day for 1 of 50 daily online academic passes for NYTimes.com.

Please log on to: http://nytimes.com/passes.

There will be many more passes available in October, thanks to the Stanford News Readership Program, who provide printed copies of the NYTimes on campus.

 

Jim McRae and KZSU Project South volunteers, 1965

Davis Houck, professor in the School of Communication at Florida State University, writes in the Clarion Ledger about the KZSU Project South Collection on the anniversary of Freedom Summer. Read the full article here.

The Research Libraries Group, Inc. (RLG) was founded by The New York Public Library and Columbia, Harvard, and Yale universities and incorporated as a not-for-profit organization in late 1975. In 1978 RLG moved its offices from Branford, Connecticut, to Stanford University in California; adopted Stanford’s library automation staff and computer system (BALLOTS) as the starting point for its own library system (RLIN), plus a series of complementary services and databases; and opened its membership to research institutions throughout the U.S.

James Roderick Lilley (1928-2009) was an American diplomat who was the ambassador to China during the time of the Tiananmen Square protests. The youngest of three children, he was born to American parents in China and was educated in American schools there until he returned to the US in 1940. After graduation from Yale University in 1951, he was employed by the CIA from 1951-1978 and worked in various Asian countries. He served as director of the American Institute in Taiwan from 19981-1984, Ambassador to South Korea from 1986-1989, and Ambassador to China from 1989-1991. He was Assistant Secretary of Defense from 1991-1993, and upon retirement from government service worked at the American Enterprise Institute. His memoir China Hands: nine decades of adventure, espionage, and diplomacy in Asia was published in 2004.

Bill and Melinda Gates during their visit to the Oslo Opera House in June 2009.

Stanford's 2014 Commencement speakers are philanthropists Bill and Melinda Gates. You can read about them and about Commencement Weekend both in this article from the Stanford Report and on the 2014 Commencement website. Commencement will take place in the Stanford Stadium on Sunday, June 15.

Take a look at SearchWorks for titles by Bill Gates and by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation available in the libraries. You can also view biographical information about Bill Gates and Melinda Gates in the Biography in Context database.

Please join us in welcoming our newest team member Owen Ellis, who started on June 2nd as the project archivist for the William Hewlett papers. This is a two year processing project based at our new Redwood City location.

Owen relocated from Virginia, where he was employed by History Associates for the past three years. He was involved in processing various collections for the National Park Services working at the Shenandoah National Park, the Saratoga National Historical Park, the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historical Park and the Keweenaw National Historical Park. Prior to that Owen was employed at the Bentley Historical Library at the University of Michigan where he received his master’s in library and information science. 

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