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Dear all,

The East Asia Library of Stanford University will reopen to the public at its new location in Lathrop Library on Monday, September 15, 2014. In addition to three floors of stacks, the new East Asia Library possesses several conference, seminar, and group study rooms, numerous sofas, chairs, and desks under sunny windows, large exhibit spaces, state-of-the-art technology including dual-boot MAC/Windows computers and a latest-generation microfilm reader, and a newly established special collection. This beautiful facility will provide a new level of service to the faculty and students in East Asian studies both on Stanford campus and beyond. We look forward to welcoming you in our new library soon.

Best wishes,
Jidong Yang, Ph.D.
Head, East Asia Library
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

Dr. Rob Sanderson

In a move that will have a profound and long-lasting impact on the library sector, the W3C officially chartered a new working group on Web Annotation on August 20, 2014. Stanford Libraries staff member, Rob Sanderson, will serve as the working group's inaugural co-chair. 

The W3C is the standards body that guides the development of the Web, and has had a longstanding Open Annotation Community Group focused on how to annotate digital resources on the Web. As a newly chartered working group, the output of these discussions can now be channeled into official W3C recommendations, and baked into fabric of the Web itself.  

As library content and services become increasingly digital, the ability to annotate it--provide commentary, analysis, reviews, transcription, description, links and more--is increasingly a concern. By helping define a standard approach to annotation (in the broadest sense) of web resources, libraries can help fulfill their traditional mission of supporting research, scholarly communication and the diffusion of knowledge in the 21st century. And by working deeply in standards efforts like those of the W3C, libraries can help ensure their technologies and services are integral to and leverage the latest information technologies, instead of competing with them or lagging behind. 

Dr. Sanderson, who joined Stanford Libraries in April of 2014, brings extensive experience in annotations to the W3C and Stanford. He was one of the principal investigators of the Open Annotation Collaboration, a precursor to the W3C community group, where he also served as co-chair and a driving force. In recognition of his ongoing contributions and position within the community, Dr. Sanderson is serving as one of the co-chairs of the Working Group, which is a boon for the W3C, for Stanford, and for the future of annotation on the Web. 

Lithograph image, Recolte du café by Rugendas Johann Moritz, 1802-1858

The Stanford Libraries hold one of the most comprehensive Braziliana collections in North America. Research interests in the region date back to the university’s early years with noted  geology professor John Casper Branner.  Before coming to campus in 1891 he had participated in two scientific expeditions to Brazil and would lead two other such important research field trips in 1899 and 1907. Cultural exchanges between Stanford and Brazil continue to this day. (1)

The collection is rich in pre-1900 travel accounts (200+ titles) and includes such rare treasures as Jean de Léry's Histoire d’un voyage fait en la terre du Brésil (1585) and Maurice Rugendas’ Voyage pittoresque dans le Brésil (1835). Lery's account of a year spent living among the Tupinamba Indians is considered a masterpiece of early modern ethnography and the rich visual imagery of Rugendas documented landscapes, fauna and flora in 1820s Brazil. 

Ebola

The current outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa is the deadliest ever. To find out more about Ebola, see the pages issued by the Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization (including a response plan), as well as the MedlinePlus Web Topic on Hemorrhagic Fevers. For articles and more, try the "Special Reports and Hot Topics" link from the database Access World News for a special report on Ebola, and the Lane Medical Library.

Gruesome Spectacles: Botched Executions and America's Death Penalty by Austin Sarat, published by Stanford University Press

Whatever your opinion on the death penalty is, there is no doubt that the three mishandled executions this past year (most recently this week in Arizona) were an unpleasant reminder of the complex nature of the law itself. Legal Scholar Austin Sarat, author of Gruesome Spectacles: Botched Executions and America's Death Penalty, published by Stanford University Press, discussed the subject on NPR's Morning Edition with Steve Inskeep. Sarat provided historical context and an unbiased explanation of the current state of the death penalty in America.

Tape container for Wind (1961)

The Archive of Recorded Sound is delighted to announce that the Richard Maxfield Collection (ARS.0074) can now be listened to online, via the collection's finding aid on the Online Archive of California. This collection features nine distinct works by electronic music composer Richard Maxfield, composed between 1959-1964, four of which are believed to be previously unpublished (Dromenom, Electronic Symphony, Suite from Peripateia, and Wind). Additionally, as Maxfield frequently produced unique edits of his work for each performance, many of the open tape reels that form this collection include alternative edits to those previously published, such as the tapes for Amazing Grace which feature three different versions of the work. 

Starting tomorrow, Stanford-affiliated users may sign up every day for 1 of 50 daily online academic passes for NYTimes.com.

Please log on to: http://nytimes.com/passes.

There will be many more passes available in October, thanks to the Stanford News Readership Program, who provide printed copies of the NYTimes on campus.

 

Jim McRae and KZSU Project South volunteers, 1965

Davis Houck, professor in the School of Communication at Florida State University, writes in the Clarion Ledger about the KZSU Project South Collection on the anniversary of Freedom Summer. Read the full article here.

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