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Tomorrow evening filmmaker Oliver Stone and historian Peter Kuznick will be participating in a panel discussion and showing their new documentary about the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima. In the film — entitled The Bomb— Stone and Kuznick suggest that the bombing of Hiroshima was not necessary to end World War II. The panel discussion will be moderated by History Professor Emeritus Barton Bernstein, and will also include Daniel Ellsberg, the former military analyst who in 1971 provided the Pentagon Papers to the New York Times.

The Bomb is an episode of Stone's Showtime series The Untold History of the United States, based on the book of the same name by Stone and Kuznick.

The event takes place Friday, February 22, at 6:00 p.m. in the Lane History Corner, Room 02.

Bernstein will be giving a follow-up lecture on Friday, March 1, at 6:00 p.m. in the Lane History Corner, Room 205.

 

Pope? Nope.

Pope Benedict XVI announced today that as of 28 February 2013, he would be resigning from his position as leader of the Roman Catholic Church. This is the first papal resignation since 1415, when Gregory XII stepped down to bring about an end to the Western Schism.

Take a look at SearchWorks for material about Benedict XVI and the papacy.

We are excited to announce that 187 posters from the STOP AIDS Project records have been digitized, accessioned into the Stanford Digital Repository and are now available online via the collection's finding aid.

 

Come take a look at the beautiful new Istanbul poster exhibition in the lobby of Green Library's East Wing. The posters feature photographs and text by students who went to Istanbul last August for a three-week Bing Overseas Seminar with Professor Ali Yaycioğlu of the History Department. There's a corresponding book display highlighting materials about Istanbul from our collection.


The Istanbul poster exhibition will be on display in the lobby of Green East until March 15, 2013.

Today's the birthday of Bay Area resident and writer Michael Pollan, born on this date in 1955. Pollan is the author of four New York Times bestsellers: The Botany of Desire: A Plant’s-Eye View of the World (2001); The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals (2006); In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto (2008); and Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual (2010). In his In Defense of Food, Pollan sums up his approach to nutrition with the following seven words: “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.”

Take a look at SearchWorks for further titles by Michael Pollan available in the libraries.

Shelves of books at Chemistry & Chemical Engineering Library

In late December, we surveyed Stanford faculty in the Schools of Humanities & Sciences, Engineering, Education, and Earth Sciences about the “many kinds of resources that might be important to your research”. We are still working on a full analysis of all the data generated by the survey, but wanted to go ahead and start sharing some initial results.

The first set of questions asked faculty “How important are the following types of scholarly materials for your research?”, following by a list of various types of resources. Response choices were: Very Important, Important, Somewhat Important, Not Important. Below are some general results from those questions, broken down by Humanities & Arts faculty, Social Sciences faculty (including Graduate School of Education), and Science & Engineering faculty (including School of Earth Sciences).

  • 90% of faculty say Print Books are Important or Very Important to their research. Faculty in the Humanities and Arts are most enamored of Print Books, with 96% rating them as Important or Very Important. Large majorities of Social Scientists (90%) and Science & Engineering (79%) faculty also rate Print Books as Important or Very Important.
  • E-Books are also Important or Very Important to a majority of faculty in all disciplines: 75% in Humanities & Arts, 65% in Social Sciences, 68% in Science & Engineering. 
  • Nearly all faculty (over 94% across all disciplines) say E-Journals are Important or Very Important; but Print Journals are Important or Very Important primarly to those in Humanities and the Arts (76%). Only 36% of Science and Engineering faculty, and only 28% of Social Sciences faculty rate Print Journals as Important or Very Important.
  • Textual Data are important to many Humanities (44%) and Social Science (38%) faculty, but much less so to Science & Engineering faculty (9%). Maps and Geospatial data are important to 25% of faculty overall, with slightly more interest from Social Scientists than from Humanists or Science & Engineering faculty.
  • For all the other kinds of resources we asked about, the differences between disciplines are large and not particularly surprising. Numeric data is important to more Social Science (62%) and Science & Engineering faculty (55%) than Humanities faculty (19%). Archival materials, non-English language materials, reference works, images, film, video and audio are all important to much larger percentages of Humanists than to Social Scientists and Science & Engineering faculty.
  • Response rates: Our overall response rate was 17%, with Humanities & Arts faculty twice as likely (N=68, 29%) as Social Sciences (N=32, 15%) or Science & Engineering faculty (N=57, 13%) to respond. A total of 157 faculty members took the time to respond, and we are very grateful to them.

We also asked several open-ended questions about how faculty accessed resources and what might improve their access to resources that are important to them. We asked similar questions about a variety of tools (e.g. the library website, SearchWorks, bibliographic management software), and expertise (e.g. subject librarians, data specialists). We will post results from those questions soon, as we continue to work on a full analysis of the data. 

Richard Blanco—son of Cuban immigrants and civil engineer—will be the poet at the second inauguration of President Barack Obama on January 21. Blanco joins the list of inaugural poets that includes such names as Robert Frost and Maya Angelou.

There are three titles of Richard Blanco's poetry available in the libraries:

City of a Hundred Fires

Directions to the Beach of the Dead

Looking for the Gulf Motel

 

 

The Library of Congress has made available a set of audio interviews that retired music executive Joe Smith conducted with more than 200 singers and musicians.

You can listen to Smith's interviews with Tony Bennett, Burt Bacharach, Ray Charles, George Harrison, Mick Jagger, Paul McCartney, and Dave Brubeck (who died today at age 91), to name just a few.

From the Library of Congress' web page about the Joe Smith Collection at the Library of Congress:

More than 25 years ago, retired music executive Joe Smith accomplished a Herculean feat—he got more than 200 celebrated singers, musicians and industry icons to talk about their lives, music, experiences and contemporaries. In 2012 Smith donated this treasure trove of unedited sound recordings to the nation’s library.

The Joe Smith Collection contains over 225 recordings of noted artists and executives and is a veritable who’s who in the music industry. They include Artie Shaw, Woody Herman, Ray Charles, Barbra Streisand, Little Richard, Bob Dylan, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Elton John, Paul Simon, David Bowie, Billy Joel, Sting, Tony Bennett, Joan Baez, James Taylor, Dick Clark, Tina Turner, Tom Jones, B.B. King, Quincy Jones, David Geffen, Mickey Hart, Harry Belafonte and many others. All types of popular music are represented—from rock ‘n’ roll, jazz, rhythm & blues and pop to big-band, heavy metal, folk and country-western.

 

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