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Shelves of books at Chemistry & Chemical Engineering Library

In late December, we surveyed Stanford faculty in the Schools of Humanities & Sciences, Engineering, Education, and Earth Sciences about the “many kinds of resources that might be important to your research”. We are still working on a full analysis of all the data generated by the survey, but wanted to go ahead and start sharing some initial results.

The first set of questions asked faculty “How important are the following types of scholarly materials for your research?”, following by a list of various types of resources. Response choices were: Very Important, Important, Somewhat Important, Not Important. Below are some general results from those questions, broken down by Humanities & Arts faculty, Social Sciences faculty (including Graduate School of Education), and Science & Engineering faculty (including School of Earth Sciences).

  • 90% of faculty say Print Books are Important or Very Important to their research. Faculty in the Humanities and Arts are most enamored of Print Books, with 96% rating them as Important or Very Important. Large majorities of Social Scientists (90%) and Science & Engineering (79%) faculty also rate Print Books as Important or Very Important.
  • E-Books are also Important or Very Important to a majority of faculty in all disciplines: 75% in Humanities & Arts, 65% in Social Sciences, 68% in Science & Engineering. 
  • Nearly all faculty (over 94% across all disciplines) say E-Journals are Important or Very Important; but Print Journals are Important or Very Important primarly to those in Humanities and the Arts (76%). Only 36% of Science and Engineering faculty, and only 28% of Social Sciences faculty rate Print Journals as Important or Very Important.
  • Textual Data are important to many Humanities (44%) and Social Science (38%) faculty, but much less so to Science & Engineering faculty (9%). Maps and Geospatial data are important to 25% of faculty overall, with slightly more interest from Social Scientists than from Humanists or Science & Engineering faculty.
  • For all the other kinds of resources we asked about, the differences between disciplines are large and not particularly surprising. Numeric data is important to more Social Science (62%) and Science & Engineering faculty (55%) than Humanities faculty (19%). Archival materials, non-English language materials, reference works, images, film, video and audio are all important to much larger percentages of Humanists than to Social Scientists and Science & Engineering faculty.
  • Response rates: Our overall response rate was 17%, with Humanities & Arts faculty twice as likely (N=68, 29%) as Social Sciences (N=32, 15%) or Science & Engineering faculty (N=57, 13%) to respond. A total of 157 faculty members took the time to respond, and we are very grateful to them.

We also asked several open-ended questions about how faculty accessed resources and what might improve their access to resources that are important to them. We asked similar questions about a variety of tools (e.g. the library website, SearchWorks, bibliographic management software), and expertise (e.g. subject librarians, data specialists). We will post results from those questions soon, as we continue to work on a full analysis of the data. 

Richard Blanco—son of Cuban immigrants and civil engineer—will be the poet at the second inauguration of President Barack Obama on January 21. Blanco joins the list of inaugural poets that includes such names as Robert Frost and Maya Angelou.

There are three titles of Richard Blanco's poetry available in the libraries:

City of a Hundred Fires

Directions to the Beach of the Dead

Looking for the Gulf Motel

 

 

The Library of Congress has made available a set of audio interviews that retired music executive Joe Smith conducted with more than 200 singers and musicians.

You can listen to Smith's interviews with Tony Bennett, Burt Bacharach, Ray Charles, George Harrison, Mick Jagger, Paul McCartney, and Dave Brubeck (who died today at age 91), to name just a few.

From the Library of Congress' web page about the Joe Smith Collection at the Library of Congress:

More than 25 years ago, retired music executive Joe Smith accomplished a Herculean feat—he got more than 200 celebrated singers, musicians and industry icons to talk about their lives, music, experiences and contemporaries. In 2012 Smith donated this treasure trove of unedited sound recordings to the nation’s library.

The Joe Smith Collection contains over 225 recordings of noted artists and executives and is a veritable who’s who in the music industry. They include Artie Shaw, Woody Herman, Ray Charles, Barbra Streisand, Little Richard, Bob Dylan, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Elton John, Paul Simon, David Bowie, Billy Joel, Sting, Tony Bennett, Joan Baez, James Taylor, Dick Clark, Tina Turner, Tom Jones, B.B. King, Quincy Jones, David Geffen, Mickey Hart, Harry Belafonte and many others. All types of popular music are represented—from rock ‘n’ roll, jazz, rhythm & blues and pop to big-band, heavy metal, folk and country-western.

 

The Department of History presents “Kennedy, Khrushchev: 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis,” a talk by Barton J. Bernstein, Professor of History, Emeritus, Stanford University. The event takes place today, Friday, November 9, at 7:00 pm in the Lane History Corner, room 205.

Check SearchWorks for material about the Cuban Missile Crisis available in the libraries.

 

 

The Lane Medical Library is presenting the Open Everything Series, with three events over the course of the next week:

1. Trends and Emerging Issues Relating to Open Access, Open Data with Lauren Schoenthaler, Senior University Counsel, Stanford University
November 6
Tuesday, 2- 3:30 pm, LK102

2. Stanford Digital Repository with Mimi Calter, Assistant University Librarian & Chief of Staff
November 8
Thursday, 3-4:30 pm, LK102
 
3. Learning in the Wild: What Open Learning Could Mean for Teachingwith Amy Collier, Director for Technology and Teaching, Office of the Vice Provost for Online Learning
November 14
Wednesday, 2:00 – 3:30 pm, LK102

From the Open Knowledge web page:
 
At Stanford's Lane Medical Library & Knowledge Management Center our mission is to enable biomedical discovery by connecting people with knowledge.
 
As part of this mission, we advocate for open access to all forms of knowledge. The global Open Access movement has vastly increased access to journal articles, data sets, and other knowledge media. Yet, many of these valued scholarly resources are only available to those who pay for access.
 
Join us and our OPEN EVERYTHING speakers as we explore the future possibilities of shared scholarship.

NYTimes.com academic passes (488 per day): enjoy full, complimentary access to NYTimes.com on any device for 24 hours, using your Stanford email. To get started, go to: www.nytimes.com/passes

The Hume Writing Center now has satellite drop-in tutoring hours in the lobby of Green Library's East Wing on Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 4:00 to 5:00 pm.

From the Hume Writing Center's web page: "Drop-in writing consultants are undergraduates who have been trained to help students at any stage of the writing process and can work with any piece of writing, from a Thinking Matters or PWR essay to a grant proposal or cover letter."

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