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The San Francisco Literary Festival Litquake is taking place starting today, Friday, October 5, and runs through Saturday, October 13.

From the Litquake website:

This year’s festival features 163 events, more than 850 authors — and most of it free! Here’s the entire schedule at a glance. You can also check out select highlights or the full roster of 2012 Festival authors with links to their bios. And here’s a list of our special programs for 2012, including our new Words and Pictures museum series, and the first-ever Berkeley Ramble! Not to mention the Lit Crawl schedule here.

Be sure to stop by to visit the Library Open House next Tuesday, October 9, from 1:00 to 4:00 pm here. Come to Green Library to find out about the amazing resources offered by campus Libraries and Academic Computing.

Fall foliage with Hoover Tower in background

We have an ambitious set of goals for continuing to improve and enrich the library website in October.  These priorities are based on our original project goals and on feedback and suggestions gathered from patrons and staff. Please continue to send us your feedback and encourage others to do so as well.

 Our goals for October 2012 are to:

  • Participate in the Library Open House, showing students, faculty, and staff how the new site can support their teaching, learning, and research needs.  We will also use the Open House as an opportunity to gather feedback on how scholars use the library website.
  • Convene a Library Website Steering Group, responsible for evaluating and prioritizing future website work (e.g. new feature and functionality requests, major content additions, etc.).  This group will play a crucial role in recommending priorities for development and content work on the new website, and for recommending policies and best practices for the library website.
  • Develop a way to allow People associated with Guides to see unpublished Guides in their Workbench. Currently only Authors can see unpublished Guides in Workbench, but we are working on a solution to allow all People who are added to a Guide to be able to see the unpublished Guides in their Workbench to enable easy co-editing and authoring.
  • Add spellcheck functionality to the WYSIWYG editor for content creators.
  • Enable Follow Us links on library About pages, so we will have consistent, easy way to add Facebook and Twitter links for those libraries who use social media.
  • Enable simple formatting (bold, italics, and hyperlinking) in the annotations field of SearchWorks items in Guides
  • Update the view of Blog posts by topic to sort in reverse chronological order (most recent first), and to add archives links.
  • Work on discovery and design of Collections pages.
  • Complete work on Events pages.
  • Continue to provide training and guidance to content creators.
  • Continue to respond to feedback received from patrons and staff.

 

 

Example of Top Hit for search on "wireless"

September was a busy month for the library website team. We officially launched the new site on August 28, and have been steadily adding content, features, and functionality since them.  Below is a summary of the Library website work accomplished in September. 

Patron-facing changes and enhancements:

  • Updated the footer at the bottom of every page to make the Stanford University logo link to the Stanford homepage
  • Updated the design of the “Page not Found” page to make it more user-friendly
  • Added LOCKSS to the About page
  • Added links to eJournals under Research Support drop-down and under main search box on homepage
  • Set up Google site map feed to ensure new content is indexed and findable via Google search quickly
  • Added images to Department pages
  • Added keywords and “top hit” status as appropriate to various pages to ensure accurate search results

 Content creation changes and enhancements:

  • Fixed misaligned WYSIWYG toolbar for News content type
  • Implemented de-duplication feature for generating list of Guides by subject for branch microsites, so that guides with multiple subjects are listed only once
  • Added “Publish” option for blog posts (in addition to Save option)
  • Made selected changes/additions to the Subjects list and updated display of subjects to alphabetical

 In addition to the specific work noted above, members of the Library Website Redesign project team and the Online Experience Group have:

  • Created, modified, and edited significant amounts of content in response to user feedback
  • Provided training and trouble-shooting support to content creators throughout SUL
  • Fielded approximately 200 feedback emails

 

A big thanks to all those who have worked on the site this month, especially those of you who have taken the time to send in your feedback.

 

 

Green Library

Save the date! The Library Open House is happening on Tuesday, 9 October, from 1:00 to 4:00 pm here in Green Library. Take a look at our video preview here.

Privately produced Leopold Auer recording, signed by the artist on June 7, 1920, from the Jascha Heifetz Collection.

The Archive of Recorded Sound has completed the processing of four significant collections under the sponsorship of the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) with funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation which are now ready for use by researchers, students, musicians, and the public.  The creators of all four collections have California connections, but their work and influence extended far beyond state borders to distant regions of the world.  The four collections that have been organized, arranged, and described in finding aids, which can be viewed on the Online Archive of California, are the Yehudi Menuhin, the Jascha Heifetz, the Lawrence Tibbett, and the Ambassador Auditorium Collections. The processing archivist for the project was Frank Ferko, with assistance from Anna Graves. 

Located in the City of Pasadena, the Ambassador Auditorium hosted many of the most highly regarded concert musicians and popular entertainers in the world.  From its opening night on April 7, 1974 to its closing in May, 1995, the Ambassador, often called "the Carnegie Hall of the West", presented a veritable who's who of luminaries in the world of music, dance, and popular entertainment. Among those who performed there were Artur Rubinstein, Leontyne Price, Victor Borge, Andres Segovia, Barbara Cook, the Juilliard String Quartet, the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, Yo-Yo Ma, Bob Hope, Marcel Marceau, Claire Bloom, Count Basie, Benny Goodman, Ravi Shankar, the Dance Theatre of Harlem, and many others. The Ambassador Auditorium Collection consists of thousands of documents related to the business, marketing, publicity and promotion operations of the hall as well as photographs (many of which are autographed), posters, concert programs, commissioned original artwork, and perhaps most important of all, hundreds of audio and video recordings of live performances.

Spanning 75 years, the career of Yehudi Menuhin included work as a virtuoso violinist as well as a highly respected conductor.  The Yehudi Menuhin Collection, assembled by his family, consists of fifty-four 78 rpm recordings from 1938 through 1950 of Menuhin performing violin works, often accompanied by his sister, Hephzibah.  

The Jascha Heifetz Collection, donated by the violinist's longtime friend and record producer at RCA Victor, Jack Pfeiffer, includes not only Heifetz's own performances but also his personal collection of recordings made by other artists.  The Heifetz Collection, consisting of over a thousand discs and reels produced from 1911-1972, includes the rare, privately made recording from 1920 of Heifetz's teacher, Leopold Auer, among other treasures. 

The Lawrence Tibbett Collection, consisting of 98 records documenting the middle years of the baritone's career, who sang for 27 seasons at the Metropolitan Opera (1923-1950). The collection contains an outstanding performance of a pre-premiere recording of Howard Hanson's Merry Mount, from January 1934 and also contains Tibbett's well known renditions of popular songs, such as Rodgers and Hammerstein's "Oh, what a beautiful mornin," and Harold Arlen's "Accentuate the positive", performed on live radio programs in the 1940s.

For more information and to use the collections, contact the Stanford University Archive of Recorded Sound.

Data Management Services is excited to announce the launch of our new web site!

The primary goal of Data Services is to assist Stanford's researchers with the organization, management, and curation of research data. We want to help ensure that Stanford research data is preserved and accessible now and into the future. Our new site will help campus researchers create and carry out a data management strategy that will preserve their valuable research data for future sharing and reuse.

The Data Management Planning Tool (DMP Tool) - available via the Data Services web site - is a quick and easy way for researchers to assemble data management plans for grant proposals. The tool includes up-to-date funder-specific requirements and Stanford-specific guidance, as well as suggested language for those wishing to preserve data in the Stanford Digital Repository.

Visit dataplan.stanford.edu to log into the tool with your SUNet ID. DMPTool workshops will be offered at various sites around campus throughout the fall. Check the Science and Engineering Libraries Training tab in Coursework to see dates, times, and locations. For questions or help, contact data services at ask-data-services@lists.stanford.edu.

Detail, The Metaphysics of Notation, by Mark Applebaum

Mark Applebaum, Associate Professor of Composition and Theory in the Department of Music, composed The Metaphysics of Notation specifically for installation at the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford. The complete work includes a full hand-drawn score (72’ in length, in twelve 6’ panels), two corresponding mobiles, and the print now hanging in the Music Library, which reproduces the entire drawn score. These physical elements provided visual information for musicians, ranging from Stanford students to seasoned professionals from around the world, to give 45 weekly public performances (Fridays at noon) from April 3, 2009 throughFebruary 26, 2010. Documents of the project include audio recordings and still photographs of every performance, and a short video and documentary DVD commissioned by the composer.

To herald the arrival at the Music Library of this beautiful work, violinist and Lecturer in Music Erik Ulman performed an excerpt from the score on Tuesday, March 1, 2011. Both composer Applebaum and performer Ulman answered questions from an appreciative audience of students, faculty and staff.

For more about the work, see the video, The Metaphysics of Notation, MDVD 1289.

There are also several performances posted on YouTube, including one by Sam Adams, and one by the Quadrophonnes.

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