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East Asia Library homepage

The new East Asia Library homepage is now live! There you find the latest information about the library and discover the treasures held by our Chinese, Japanese and Korean collections. Of particular interest is our Library move information page with important dates and information about our move to Lathrop Library during this summer.

Jim McRae

On April 24th, the University Archives was pleased to welcome back to the farm Jim McRae ('68), coordinator of the KZSU-sponsored Project South, which interviewed civil rights workers during the summer of 1965. Jim (seen here examining interview transcripts) sat down with us to talk about the project and even provided some personal photographs (below) and documents

Project South, 1965During the summer of 1965, eight students from Stanford University spent ten weeks in the southern states tape-recording information on student participation in the Civil Rights Movement. The eight interviewers -- Mary Kay Becker, Mark Dalrymple, Roger Dankert, Richard Gillam, James McRae, Penny Niland, Jon Roise, and Julie Wells -- were sponsored by KZSU, Stanford's student radio station, and their original intent was to gather material suitable for rebroadcasting in the form of radio programs. Northern college students who were working in the South for the first time were the major focus, although many other topics were also investigated. To find out why these students decided to go to the South to work for the movement, what they expected to find there, what they did find, the pressures they experienced, their reaction to these pressures, what they accomplished, and what they planned to do in the future (both near and distant), they interviewed as many students as possible. What is planned is a series of programs expressing in the volunteers' and workers' own words, their motivations and their feelings towards the many aspects of the South and of the Civil Rights Movement experienced that summer.

Alumni group photograph, undated

The Archives is pleased to announce that it is one of three campus recipients of this year's Stanford Associates Grant, awarded by the Stanford Alumni Association.

From May 1st to August 29th, Special Collections will open at 8 a.m. Monday through Friday instead of our usual 10 a.m. start time. Melissa Pincus has been hired to work our front desk during this test period and see how patrons respond to the earlier start time. Melissa comes to us from the University Archives where she worked on processing the Shockley Papers and she currently works part-time as a reference librarian at Menlo College.


While we are opening the room earlier in the day,  it is important to note that the page schedule from Sal2 and Sal3 remains the same (10 a.m. for Sal3 and 12 noon for Sal2).

Colombian writer Gabriel García Márquez died yesterday in Mexico City at the age of 87.

Márquez, whose novels include One Hundred Years of Solitude and Love in the Time of Cholera, received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1982 "for his novels and short stories, in which the fantastic and the realistic are combined in a richly composed world of imagination, reflecting a continent's life and conflicts." You can read more about García Márquez in the Dictionary of Literary Biography.

You can discover in SearchWorks books by García Márquez and films based on his work.

Available here is a Democracy Now! interview with Chilean writer Isabel Allende on the life and work of García Márquez.

 

The moon turns red and orange during a total lunar eclipse.

Tonight -- if you can stay up past your bedtime -- you can view a total lunar eclipse: the Moon will pass completely through the Earth's shadow. The partial eclipse begins at 10:58 pm PDT and ends at 2:33 tomorrow morning; the greatest eclipse takes place at 12:46 am. 

If you can't stay up past your bedtime, you can always take a look at SearchWorks for titles about lunar eclipses. There's also a primer on lunar eclipses available here.

Donald Pippin, Artistic Director of Pocket Opera

Since 1952 Donald Pippin has been a part of the musical life of San Francisco. He is best known as the founder of Pocket Opera, which started in 1977 with the purpose of making opera more accessible to the average concert goer by presenting opera in unique English language translations with a small chamber ensemble. The Donald Pippin Collection consists primarily of Pippin's English translations of opera librettos available as pdf files. Follow the links in the finding aid to download the files.

Radio Station KZSU

The University Archives and DLSS are pleased to announce that the Project South transcripts are now online. The transcripts document meetings and interviews with civil rights workers in the South recorded by several Stanford students affiliated with the campus radio station KZSU during the summer of 1965. The project was sponsored by the Institute of American History at Stanford. 

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