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Chinese door god prints; officials bringing a rise in rank and a rise in official salary circa 1900.

It is with sadness that I announce the departure of our lead processing archivist, Joe Geller, who is relocating to the east coast. He will be greatly missed by all our staff on the Redwood City campus and throughout the library.

Joe started at SUL in 2006 as a curatorial assistant for Annette Keogh, the former curator for British and American Literature. During these years, I was fortunate to work with Joe as he processed several literature collections, notably:  Irving Rosenthal papers, Rae Armantrout papers, and Edward Dahlberg papers.

Women playing basketball on field,1900. Stanford Historical Photograph Collection (SC1071: 3293-006).

The University Archives is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibition celebrating the 25th anniversary of Stanford Women's first NCAA basketball victory.

Portrait of Ruth Asawa and wire sculptures by Nat Farbman, from 1955 Guggenheim fellowship application

After more than a year of intensive organizing and arranging, we are very proud to announce that the papers of artist and educator Ruth Asawa (M1585) are now available for research. The finding aid can be accessed from the Online Archive of Calfornia, and the collection record in the Searchworks catalog. A bibliography is also available from the Stanford Digital Repository.

The collection documents her commissions and other creative work as well her involvement in shaping civic arts and educational policy. Perhaps the greatest number of files contain correspondence from a remarkably diverse community of associates: friends, neighbors, artists, teachers, students, architects, designers, patrons, politicians, and philanthropists. She was also close to such major figures as Buckminster Fuller, Imogen Cunningham, Josef and Anni Albers, Ray Johnson, and countless others. In a sense, her papers can be considered a collection of collections. Scholars studying San Francisco history, art education pedagogy, fundraising for non-profits, public art, Japanese American Internment, or Black Mountain College will be rewarded by the collection's breadth.

Of course, there is also a great deal of information on Asawa's own art, particularly her unique wire constructions. The collection contains communication with galleries and museums, many photographs and slides, and insights on her artistic processes as included in portfolios and applications. For instance, here is some detail from an insert in her 1955 Guggenheim application. There are many of these halftone images of her crocheted wire shapes:

 detail, halftone image of Asawa wire sculptures 1955

Please stay tuned: we'll be posting a few more entries on Asawa in the weeks to come.

Alert 747: Cecil H. Green LIbrary exhibit of the Vela 6911 Collection by Victor Gama (Archive of Recorded Sound ARS.0149)

Alert 747: Suspected Nuclear Test  - A journey to uncover facts and create dialog through humanistic creative production. This February, Stanford University Libraries (SUL) highlights a special collection, Vela 6911 by Victor Gama, with an exhibit on display in the Green Library South Lobby from February 3- March 9, 2015.  Vela 6911 is a multimedia musical piece created by Victor Gama, an Angolan composer and designer of contemporary musical instruments for new music. This exhibit offers a glimpse into this vast collection of research, images, video content and musical scores that reside in the SUL Archive of Recorded Sound.  It also supports and coincides with the March 6th live performance of VELA 6911 by Gama, the Stanford University New Ensemble and special guests from Stanford’s Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). Information about the concert is at the Stanford Events Page. 

IMF Open Data Portal

The International Monetary Fund or IMF made their statistical data available for free on January 1st, 2015. Part of their plan for the transition is to introduce a new upgraded interface to improve the usability of the data.

Now that the the IMF Data Portal public beta version has been launched, the IMF is seeking input and feedback from our campus users on this resource!  Here's how you can help out:

Beginning from next week, February 2, the East Asia Library will have longer hours during the academic year. For the first time the library will open on Saturdays from 9am to 5pm. Since the library moved to its current location at Lathrop, user traffic has increased greatly, thanks to its attractive physical environment and ample study spaces. Saturday hours are expected to give users even better access to the library's collections and facilities.

Evening hours will also be extended, from 9pm to 10pm Monday to Thursday. Specific hours during the academic year are:

Monday - Thursday:  9am-10pm

Friday:  9am-6pm

Saturday: 9am-5pm

Sunday: 1pm-9pm

The hours vary during intersession and holidays. The most current calendar information will be posted on the At a glance page.

nous sommes charlie

Today's deadly attack at the offices of French satirical journal Charlie Hebdo points to the enduring importance of the free circulation of ideas in a global society. While we do not have a collection of the journal itself, Charlie Hebdo and the work of its journalists is well-represented in Stanford Libraries' collections.

Materials primarily about Charlie Hebdo

Works of satirical cartoonist Cabu

Works of cartoonist Bernard Verlhac, known as Tignous

Works of cartoonist Stephane Charbonnier, known as Charb

Works of cartoonist Georges Wolinski

Works of economist Bernard Maris

Current French Press: 

Agence France Presse (French) Agence France Presse (English) 

Le Monde or 


France24   (French news in English, live video feeds)


Responses to the event -

Artists respond, collected in Libération 

Cécile Alduy, Stanford French professor, in Al Jazeera America