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Photo of library intern Mia Kirkendoll

Over the last 6 weeks, I've been extremely lucky to work with Mia Kirkendoll. As her intern supervisor, I've been proud to watch Mia come into her own as a mature and professional young lady. Mia is part of the Stanford Libraries internship program for local First Generation college students.

Leland Stanford Junior University insurance maps, 1917

The University Archives is pleased to announe that it has added several items to the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR) recently. Included amongst the treasures are a variety of University maps and motion pictures, as well as faculty papers. Highlights include:

To-date, over 160 University Archives collections have been added to SDR via self-deposit.

Stanford University Libraries has just acquired access to a few new databases for scholars working on French and Italian topics! 

Olschki Complete online: All monographs and conference proceedings published between 2000-2011 by the prestigious Italian publishing house Leo S. Olschki are now available online through the Torrossa/Editoria Italiana Online database, along with Italian scholarly publications from many other important publishers. Most of the Olschki titles are on Italian literature and history, but there are also works in other disciplines such as classics, art and art history, philosophy, and musicology. As with other titles in Torrossa, you may download the PDFs in Adobe Acrobat. Mac users need to open Acrobat before opening the PDF - it does not work in Preview.
 
Corpus Montaigne: "Contains all the different editions of the works of Montaigne from the 16th and 17th centuries, published from the manuscripts and the printed originals, including "all the works published in Montaigne's lifetime and after his death by his daughter-in-law, Marie de Gournay, all the editions published from the 16th to the 20th century, their annotation and critical apparatus." Also includes PDF reproductions of selected works."
 
Grand corpus des grammaires françaises, des remarques et des traités sur la langue (XIVe-XVIIe s.) : "The Grand Corpus des grammaires françaises, des remarques et des traités sur la langue XVe-XVIIe siècles (Great Corpus of French language Grammars, Commentaries and Treatises on language (15th-17th centuries)) groups together in one database the Corpus of French Renaissance grammars, the Corpus of French 17th century grammars and the Corpus of remarks on the French language (17th Century). This is close to representing all the French grammars of the 15th and 17th centuries. Each grammar is presented both in a digitalised format identical to the original version and also as a fac-simile. The Great Corpus is unique in that it allows research ranging from basic reference to in-depth academic research, according to the requirements of researchers and students."
The Istanbul skyline as seen from the Marmara hotel on Taksim Square

What exactly happened in Turkey last month and what is happening at this moment? What kind of historical events led up to it? You can find information on the history of the Turkish government and politics in SearchWorks.

On May 28, 2013 a peaceful sit-in at Gezi Park in Taksim, Istanbul was disrupted by police and resulted in a number of deaths and many injuries. The sit-in was a response to an announcement made by the government for plans to demolish the small park and replace it with a shopping mall. After the violent police reaction, many other protests about governmental personal liberty infringements in Turkey formed and grew into movements.

These movements emulate the Occupy movements from the western world and are rapidly spreading throughout the rest of Turkey (Ankara, Izmir, Bursa, Trabzon, Samsun Edirne, and many other cities). The popular Turkish band “Kardeş Türküler” has even produced a protest video on YouTube. Social media outlets, especially Twitter, are playing an important part in the quick distribution of public information. In response, Prime Minister Erdogan called Twitter a “menace.”

For current English-language news about the situation in Turkey we have links to daily online newspapers and their Facebook and Twitter accounts as well:

[Update #1: I added links to the OnlineBooks site at UPenn for historic materials from the "United States Senate Select Committee to Study Governmental Operations With Respect to Intelligence Activities" and "United States. National Security Agency -- History." OnlineBooks site pulls together digital material from HathiTrust and Internet Archive with items in your library's catalog. Very nice indeed! Thanks John Mark Ockerbloom at UPenn for the suggestion!]

There has been an ongoing series of bombshell reports this past week about the recently leaked news that the National Security Agency (NSA) has been collecting wholesale Americans' phone communications, email- and internet traffic in several top-secret programs -- most notably the program called PRISM, which seems to be an outgrowth of the Total Information Awareness (TIA) program defunded by Congress in 2003 after a huge public outcry. The best coverage so far has been by the Guardian's Glenn Greenwald and the Washington Post. But there's also been a document dump by the Web group Anonymous (http://pastebin.com/MPpT7xaf) as well as analysis and reports by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and Democracy Now.

We thought it'd be helpful to point to some library and information resources in an effort to help the Stanford community and the public wrap their heads around the complex issues surrounding the NSA revelations.

Laws and government acronyms:

Ongoing news coverage about the NSA and its secret program:

Library materials and resources to gather news and historical context:

Databases:

Background videos:

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

SUL Library Systems will upgrade Symphony to the latest SirsiDynix release, Symphony 3.4.1 SP3, during the period June 21-22.

During the upgrade, WorkFlows, Socrates and My Account functionality will be unavailable. SearchWorks will still be available throughout the upgrade, however request links and availability status will not be functioning.

The upgrade will start on Friday, June 21 at 9pm, and should be complete by 9am Saturday, June 22 (before any libraries open.) All staff who use WorkFlows should check their e-mail before logging on to the system after this time. An announcement of upgrade completion will be sent, including instructions for updating the WorkFlows client.

The New York Times program offering 24 hour daily online passes is not available this summer.

This program will resume in the fall.

The best online source for the current issues (latest two weeks) is Factiva - a database which also has the latest issues of Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, The Times (London), and more. The New York Times: archive offers articles from 1851-2009 from ProQuest.

We have these newspapers and many more in the Information Center of Green Library.

 

 

Stanford's 2013 Commencement speaker is Michael Bloomberg, who since 2002 has served as Mayor of New York City. You can read about Mayor Bloomberg and about Commencement Weekend in this article from the Stanford Report and on the 2013 Commencement website.

Take a look at SearchWorks for titles by and about Mayor Bloomberg available in the libraries. You can also view biographical information about him in the Biography in Context database.

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