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A bunch of federal websites will shut down with the government, By Andrea Peterson, Washington Post, Published: September 30 at 5:28 pm. Also: The Government Printing Office (GPO) reports:

"GPO will not be updating gpo.gov, FDLP.gov, the Catalog of Government Publications, Ben’s Guide, or be responding to askGPO questions until funding is restored. The Laurel warehouse will be closed so there will be no shipments to depository libraries. Congressional materials will continue to be processed and posted to FDsys. Federal Register services on FDsys will be limited to documents that protect life and property. The remaining collections on FDsys will not be updated and will resume after funding is restored."

Sites that are down include NASA, Library of Congress, Department of Education's ERIC database, Census and USDA. Arstechnica checked 56 .gov sites and found 10 that went dark. See "Shutdown of US government websites appears bafflingly arbitrary." (Originally posted on Free Government Information blog.)

Green Library: New Student Orientation Tour

More than 1,000 students attended tours of the Stanford libraries during New Student Orientation and the first week of the quarter to learn about our amazing resources, study spaces, and librarians who are here to help with research.

Welcome to Stanford and welcome to the libraries!

Ask Us wristband

If you see folks in the libraries wearing these green Ask Us wristbands, they're there to help! Please feel free to talk to them if you have any questions about how to make your way around the libraries.

You can have access for 24 hours, using your Stanford email - see Nytimes.com/passes. (This includes five free articles from 1923-1986.) There is a limit of 488 simultaneous users. For more online access, and location of print copies, see this record on Searchworks. For more information, here's the FAQ.

 

Red Fountain

Green Library's reference librarians have expanded their natural habitat! You can find a reference librarian near the red fountain outside Green's East Wing Monday through Friday from 1:00 to 3:00 pm. Stop by with questions!

Buenzle scrapbook photo

     In 1886, a sixteen-year-old named Fred Buenzle did what many boys had dreamed of: joining the Navy and sailing the high seas. Recognizing that the Navy was changing rapidly, he took note of the stories and lore of old salts and devoted himself to chronicling his own adventures; training in the Caribbean, briefly leaving the service in China, and in Cuba during the Spanish-American War. A stenographer who rose in rank to Chief Yeoman, Buenzle was the court reporter for the investigation of the sinking of the U.S.S. Maine, and took dictation for many of the Navy’s highest officers, including Theodore Roosevelt when he was briefly Secretary. Buenzle also founded and edited “The Bluejacket,” the first newsletter for enlisted men, and fought against discrimination of uniformed sailors.

     Special Collections has recently acquired and processed the Fred J. Buenzle papers, which contain scrapbooks, unpublished manuscripts, and hundreds of photographs documenting his naval career, family, and subsequent retirement at his ranch in Los Gatos.

St. Thomas, 1891

Albumen print of St. Thomas from Buenzle scrapbook, May 1891.

 

Stanford Safari students pose with Daniel Hartwig, University Archivist

The University Archives was pleased once again to participate in professor Bob Siegel's sophomore college class, "The Stanford Safari." Students learned about the purpose and scope of the Archives' operations and viewed select items from the University's history (yes, that's Leland Stanford's death mask).

Section relating to Special Collections Technical Services at SUL's Redwood City location.

Changes are on the horizon for Special Collections’ Technical Services Divisions - specifically the Rare Book Cataloging and Manuscripts Units. A few recent posts have referred to our imminent move to SUL’s Redwood City (RWC) location, so here finally is some information about this event. The Rare Book Cataloging Unit is the first to move and is being relocated over the Labor Day weekend; the Manuscripts Technical Services Unit will move there around the end of October.

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