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Cover image of Maniac Magee

Hats off to Stanford’s own Andrew Luck for promoting the love of reading. Mr. Luck has started a book club via social media. He plans to introduce a book he enjoyed as a child for younger readers, as well as a book for more seasoned readers. According to his web site he’ll introduce a new book in stages that correspond with the NFL schedule: off-season, mini-camp, summer training and pre-season. He plans to bring in guest athletes to take over until after the Super Bowl. Participants may follow along on Facebook, Instagram and/or Twitter using #ALBookClub. More information about the book club may be found on his website.

The first selections for the book club are Maniac Magee by Jerry Spinelli and the Boys in the Boat by Daniel James Brown. Both titles can be found in Stanford University Libraries.

Image of maps created with the use of the Stanford Education Data Archive
Educational opportunity is an important issue in a democratic society. In the United States, measuring educational achievement and opportunity is complex because the public education system is diffuse. Funding for public education depends on a combination of local, state and federal governing bodies. The variations in funding and community level support for public education and standardized testing makes comparisons and analysis across the U.S. an arduous task. 
 
This is why the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR) deposit of the week is critically important to note. Stanford University Professor, Sean Reardon and his colleagues have just deposited the Stanford Education and Data Archive (SEDA) into the SDR for long term preservation. This is a data set that includes 215 million test scores and tackles the difficulty of comparing test score data from every public elementary and middle school in the United States for a period of 5 years, (2009-2012). What's brilliant about this collection of data is that, Reardon and his team developed a method to equate the scores across states for comparison enabling a whole new set of questions on educational opportunity to be answered, new stories to be told, and new questions to be raised.
 
Colleagues who worked on the Rumsey Map Center Project

Today marks the end of our first week of the opening of the David Rumsey Map Center as a library and special collections center within Green. Between the opening and this week, we have had over 600 visitors and now that the excitement of the opening is behind us, I want to take this opportunity to thank you all for being instrumental in making this happen.

Charlotte Thai, Project Archivist for the Cabrinety Collection

In our final blog post for Preservation Week we’re talking with Charlotte Thai, Project Archivist in Special Collections on the Cabrinety-NIST Project. Digital preservation, a critical concern for modern archives, is supported by the Digital Library Systems and Services department and Special Collections. From born-digital access and preservation to digital reformatting across formats, it takes a small, technically-savvy village to care for our growing digital collections.

For more information about Preservation Week including resources, quick tips, and free webinars visit the American Library Association’s Preservation Week site. 

One of many open reel tapes at Stanford from the John C. Lilly papers

Part of audio preservation work includes working with media that has peculiar characteristics. Sometimes the atypical qualities are a byproduct of how the recording was made by the recordist. An example of this type of problem that we occasionally see at the Stanford Media Preservation Lab is when an open reel tape is recorded over and there is remaining content hidden in certain spots of the tape. This presents specific problems in capture since tape heads are built for use with specific physical configurations of tracks and thus capturing the hidden spots outside of the normal range of track configuration is near impossible. With this in mind SMPL recently worked on obtaining equipment to address this challenging scenario.

Freya Channing

We are pleased to announce that Freya Channing has joined our Department as the Rare Books Copy Cataloger! Please join us in welcoming her to the fold. She will begin her new position on May 1.

Freya is already familiar to many of us as she has been working in Special Collections as the Processing Assistant on the Helen & Newton Harrison Papers for the past year and a half. Prior to that her work experience has included other archival processing projects, processing and describing printed ephemera, cataloging art books, and a wide variety of digital projects including metadata creation and cleanup. Freya has a B.A. from Mills College and an MLIS from the University of Pittsburgh.

Geoff Willard, Stanford Media Preservation Lab

For today’s Preservation Week blog post we move away from book and paper preservation to meet Geoff Willard from the Stanford Media Preservation Lab (SMPL). SMPL serves to preserve and enhance access to original sound and moving image collection materials held by Stanford University Libraries.  Operations focus on creating a high-quality copy of the original content in a digital format that is easily accessed by researchers and others, and that enables ongoing, long-term management of the content for future users.

For more information about Preservation Week including resources, quick tips, and free webinars visit the American Library Association’s Preservation Week site. 

We are pleased to announce the May 2016 digital issue of the Terman Engineering Library News.

Graduate students

In the news this month:

  • Engineering Village New Feature
  • Stanford eCorner – Entrepreneurship Resources
  • BrowZine – Feedback Wanted
  • Kanopy Streaming Video – Access via SearchWorks
  • Overleaf and PNAS Partnership
  • Honors for SESI project

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