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Finding the best tool for your research and using it efficiently is a challenge for all students.  The Stanford Libraries offer workshops to help you increase your skill level and explore new resources.  Sign-up to learn about citation management tools such as Mendeley, EndNote and RefWorks as well as how to search for grants, patents, chemical information, energy information and how to keep current with new research.  This year we have added a new workshop on tips and tools for publishing. The Stanford Geospatial Center in the Branner Library offers workshops on GIS data creation and management, GPS and mobile data collection and ArcGIS.  All workshops are free and all Stanford students, faculty and staff are welcome.  Workshops are held in the Green Library, Swain Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Library, Branner Earth Sciences Library and the Huang Engineering Center. View the list of Fall 2014 workshops and sign-up.

San Francisco Ferry Building and streetcar: one of thousands of images used by the Image, Video, and Multimedia Systems research team to test image search algorithms

When you think about scientific data, you might think primarily about numbers and graphs and charts. But some data sets consist of rich image collections, including these data sets that have been preserved in the Stanford Digital Repository!

 

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Is your research confused with others who have a similar name as yours? Do you have problems distinguishing between authors with similar names?

As an author or  researcher you need to be able to easily and uniquely attach your identity to your scholarly output including datasets, articles, books, citations, and experiments.  You want to be sure you are recognized for the great work you do! The best solution is to register for your personal ORCID id to claim your publications and connect your scholarly contributions.

Seven new digital collections are now available in SearchWorks. These new collections take advantage of SearchWorks' ability to provide users with rich discovery and access capabilities for finding and working with digital collection content.

Undergraduate Theses, Department of Biology, 2013-2014 

Honors theses written by undergraduates in the Stanford University Department of Biology, 2013-2014.

Collection Contact: Hannah Frost

ACS on Campus

The Stanford Chemistry Department's Student Activity Committee, the Stanford Chemistry Department, and the Swain Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Library are co-hosting ACS on Campus at Stanford which will be held on Saturday, September 20th from 8:30am - 6:30pm in the Huang Engineering Center, Room 300 (Mackenzie Room). 

This event is free but registration is required in order to attend.  You are invited to come for as many of the sessions as your schedule allows.  Complimentary food will be provided for all registered participants.

Image from Brady, et al, DOI: 10.1016/j.neuron.2014.06.024

"We would like to provide high resolution images of brain slices for the research community to view. Would the [Stanford] Digital Repository be able to host our image data for this purpose?"

Have you ever had a similar question about how to make your research data available for other people to access? The Stanford Digital Repository is a great place to share research data of all kinds, including imagery.

John McCarthy Papers; sc0524_1995-247_b27_f12

These new collections take advantage of recently released functionality that provides researchers with new rich discovery and access capabilities for finding and working with digital collection content. Researchers may now discover the following materials: 

Pleistocene Lake Surprise

This collection provides supplemental data and spreadsheets related to the M.S. thesis in the Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences by Daniel Ibarra (December, 2014) and the subsequent publication in the Geological Society of America Bulletin (Ibarra et al., 2014). For additional information about this collection, check out this recent blog post by Amy Hodge.

Collection Contact: Amy Hodge

Lake Surprise Research by Daniel Ibarra from http://purl.stanford.edu/zd652gs8988

It is no longer a surprise how ancient lakes in the western US -- such as Lake Surprise -- managed to become so large. Research undertaken by Daniel Ibarra, a graduate student working at the time with Kate Maher, assistant professor of geological and environmental sciences, showed that the root cause was a lower rate of evaporation than we see today.

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